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Allow me to introduce myself...


Nathan Rice

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Greetings everyone,

 

I will be arriving in Cebu City in early October. I am moving with an established, profitable business in place to take advantage of the fantastic labor rates. We have significant experience in managing foreign and outsourced employees. I am interested in meeting other SUCCESSFUL expat businesspeople. My associates and I would like to establish contacts to avoid some of the minor pitfalls associates with day to day life and the physical realities of doing business in Cebu City. We have already thoroughly researched the transition and have covered the major bases, but I have learned never to underestimate the benefits of learning from those who have come before you. I want to extend an open invitation to sit down for a San Miguel or Coffee and exchange insights. I can personally provide high end technical consulting that you are unlikely to find anywhere else in the Philippines, and my business partners have an incredible wealth of experience in the areas of sales, marketing and management.

 

If you're interested and would like some additional information please PM me.

 

Take care,

 

Nathan Rice

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Hello Nathan,

 

First, your PM feature isn't enabled until you have become an active, participating member of the forums. (This is an automatic feature of the forum.)

 

Second, it isn't the smartest thing to do, especially since you haven't bothered to read the rules of the forum, to start promoting a business. (I would suggest you going back and reading the rules & guidelines, prior to making another post.)

 

Let people get to know you here first. From here, it is totally up to you.

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Hello Nathan,

 

First, your PM feature isn't enabled until you have become an active, participating member of the forums. (This is an automatic feature of the forum.)

 

Second, it isn't the smartest thing to do, especially since you haven't bothered to read the rules of the forum, to start promoting a business. (I would suggest you going back and reading the rules & guidelines, prior to making another post.)

 

Let people get to know you here first. From here, it is totally up to you.

 

Excuse me if I did not anticipate that the rules of your forum would be significantly different than the multitudes of other forums of which I have been a member. My apologies.

 

As for promoting a business, I understand that you probably have to deal with a lot troublesome people. I believe that if you examine what I wrote closely you will see that I am attempting to make contacts that could help ease our transitional period, not promote my services for any financial gain. I recognize the value of good relationships when entering a new area and I am interested in cultivating the same. I requested that people send me PMs specifically because I want to be able to screen the people to whom I communicate without being publicly rude or dismissive. I'm also not interested in having business knowledge that I share on a personal basis being indexed on several different search engines.

 

If we don't see eye to eye now then please delete this post and my account, I will find another avenue to meet the people who are serious about success in international business. We are professionals and I don't really want to deal with a bunch of people who just want help with small time website technical issues or business models.

 

Have a good day,

 

Nathan Rice

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Greetings everyone,

 

I will be arriving in Cebu City in early October. I am moving with an established, profitable business in place to take advantage of the fantastic labor rates. We have significant experience in managing foreign and outsourced employees. I am interested in meeting other SUCCESSFUL expat businesspeople. My associates and I would like to establish contacts to avoid some of the minor pitfalls associates with day to day life and the physical realities of doing business in Cebu City. We have already thoroughly researched the transition and have covered the major bases, but I have learned never to underestimate the benefits of learning from those who have come before you. I want to extend an open invitation to sit down for a San Miguel or Coffee and exchange insights. I can personally provide high end technical consulting that you are unlikely to find anywhere else in the Philippines, and my business partners have an incredible wealth of experience in the areas of sales, marketing and management.

 

If you're interested and would like some additional information please PM me.

 

Take care,

 

Nathan Rice

 

:welcome:

 

Regards Chaz

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Jess Bartone

Greetings everyone,

 

I will be arriving in Cebu City in early October. I am moving with an established, profitable business in place to take advantage of the fantastic labor rates. We have significant experience in managing foreign and outsourced employees. I am interested in meeting other SUCCESSFUL expat businesspeople. My associates and I would like to establish contacts to avoid some of the minor pitfalls associates with day to day life and the physical realities of doing business in Cebu City. We have already thoroughly researched the transition and have covered the major bases, but I have learned never to underestimate the benefits of learning from those who have come before you. I want to extend an open invitation to sit down for a San Miguel or Coffee and exchange insights. I can personally provide high end technical consulting that you are unlikely to find anywhere else in the Philippines, and my business partners have an incredible wealth of experience in the areas of sales, marketing and management.

 

If you're interested and would like some additional information please PM me.

 

Take care,

 

Nathan Rice

 

 

Hello Nathan, it's always good to hear success stories, not enough good news in the world. However, I can't help wondering why, if so successful, you would want to take "advantage" of cheap labour rates. Perhaps that word is a substitute for "exploit". I did read your 2 posts very carefully, and it seems you're not going there to enjoy the lifestyle or meet anyone who is there simply out of love for the people. "I want to be able to screen .... without being publicly rude or dismissive".

 

All I can add to that is never underestimate the Filipino spirit, or inflict your superior intellect on them. If you do not embrace the people and the culture, you will fail.

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Jess Bartone

Excuse me if I did not anticipate that the rules of your forum would be significantly different than the multitudes of other forums of which I have been a member. My apologies.

 

As for promoting a business, I understand that you probably have to deal with a lot troublesome people. I believe that if you examine what I wrote closely you will see that I am attempting to make contacts that could help ease our transitional period, not promote my services for any financial gain. I recognize the value of good relationships when entering a new area and I am interested in cultivating the same. I requested that people send me PMs specifically because I want to be able to screen the people to whom I communicate without being publicly rude or dismissive. I'm also not interested in having business knowledge that I share on a personal basis being indexed on several different search engines.

 

If we don't see eye to eye now then please delete this post and my account, I will find another avenue to meet the people who are serious about success in international business. We are professionals and I don't really want to deal with a bunch of people who just want help with small time website technical issues or business models.

Have a good day,

 

Nathan Rice

 

 

I doubt if you'll see this fellow again. To some people, the Philippines is the jewel in the crown, a wonderful place full of very interesting and lovable people, a place to fall in love truly, a Nirvana of sorts, that in many ways reflects post-war Australia.

 

Unfortunately, it is also a target for corrupt exploiters, either for sex, or in the case of Nathan, for financial gain far beyond what would be reasonable for self-support, and most of which will be taken offshore.

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In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with a foreigner coming here to start a business because the labor rates are lower. If the rates dont compete with the market, he will get what he pays for. For the lower rates he will have to put up with a lot of hassles too, so it evens out. It seems harsh to judge a person on just a few posts like this.

 

With the way the world has a way of working he could as easily give a college grad a real job over working at Jolly-bee. Sometimes it is hard to run a business in Europe with all the government laws and salary requirements, so coming here could help the man grow his business.

 

Anyway, who knows... Maybe Jesse is right and the guy is here to exploit; though I doubt he will be handcuffing children to sowing machines. :biggrin_01:

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If you do not embrace the people and the culture, you will fail.

 

This is true.

 

Embrace the people, respect them. Don't ever think that we, being people of a third world country, don't have the capability to defend ourselves against manipulating and exploiting foreigners. Remember, this is our country. We are known for our hospitality but we are also capable of doing things if our rights are trampled upon.

 

Embrace the culture. By doing so, you will know how things are done and how to do things right.

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Jess Bartone

In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with a foreigner coming here to start a business because the labor rates are lower. If the rates dont compete with the market, he will get what he pays for. For the lower rates he will have to put up with a lot of hassles too, so it evens out. It seems harsh to judge a person on just a few posts like this.

 

With the way the world has a way of working he could as easily give a college grad a real job over working at Jolly-bee. Sometimes it is hard to run a business in Europe with all the government laws and salary requirements, so coming here could help the man grow his business.

 

Anyway, who knows... Maybe Jesse is right and the guy is here to exploit; though I doubt he will be handcuffing children to sowing machines. rolleyes.gif

 

 

Smith, I totally agree about the Jollibee job thing, but your key words are "start a business", so read the 2 posts again. He virtually brags about his achievements so far, and makes it quite clear he only wants to meet those who are similarly successful, and has no time for small-time players. When Paul reminded him about the rules, he cracked the shits and asked that his membership be cancelled. For this man, money is first, last, and everything in between, kind of "if you can't help me then get out of my damn way". It does not sound to me that he is struggling under western restrictions.

 

There are a great many "successful" companies who cry poor, and use this as a justification to move their operations offshore (to third world countries). The savings generated are then handed to the board of directors in the form of bonuses. I know only too well that Filipinos need an opportunity to have meaningful work, but I firmly believe that if foreign companies arrive there with $$$ signs in their eyes, the workers should be made aware of the massive profits that are being generated off their backs, and should be paid commensurate with after-tax profits.

 

It's a double-edged sword; if a company is "successful", why do they need to "take advantage" of cheap labour, if not to increase their already reasonable profits? On the other hand, I applaud any investor who CREATES ("starts") a company in the Phils, generating jobs, and a reasonable return on their investment. The OP makes no secret of the fact the he is in the former category.

 

Angie, I hope you did not misunderstand my comment "superior intellect". That was sarcasm, pure and simple, because this fellow obviously feels he is superior to anyone less successful than himself. I have nothing against free trade and generation of wealth, but I dig my heels in when anyone uses their position of power to exploit those with very few choices, and who are desperate for a meaningful career.

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I'm into market driven approaches to these things, so I dont see much wrong with a successful company pulling out of a western country and setting up shop in the Philippines. I also dont see anything wrong with western consumers boycotting companies that make such moves. Its a paradox because western consumers seem to be mindless in that respect and are totally driven by price first, so they seem to be willing to let their own jobs go over seas if it meant a cheaper shoe or dish set. What is a reasonable return on investment? Why should a company be forced to stop making profits? When does it become the consumers responsibility to purchase with their morals rather than the best deal?

 

I am interested in meeting other SUCCESSFUL expat businesspeople.

I guess this could be take as a snooty post, but its that old issue of reading text versus seeing and hearing the person speak. It could have meant that he really meant success minded people, versus that "millionaire only club".

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Angie, I hope you did not misunderstand my comment "superior intellect". That was sarcasm, pure and simple, because this fellow obviously feels he is superior to anyone less successful than himself. I have nothing against free trade and generation of wealth, but I dig my heels in when anyone uses their position of power to exploit those with very few choices, and who are desperate for a meaningful career.

 

It's okay, Jesse. I understand. I am not easily convinced by mere words. If he thinks he is intellectually far superior to Filipinos then let him think that way. We'll see.

 

I have worked with ethnocentric people, people who believe that they belong to a decent race and look down upon Filipino people. I was a pain in their ass as I blatantly defied their manipulating and exploiting ways of handling Filipino workers. I bet they were very happy when I decided to leave the place.

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Jess Bartone

I'm into market driven approaches to these things, so I dont see much wrong with a successful company pulling out of a western country and setting up shop in the Philippines. I also dont see anything wrong with western consumers boycotting companies that make such moves. Its a paradox because western consumers seem to be mindless in that respect and are totally driven by price first, so they seem to be willing to let their own jobs go over seas if it meant a cheaper shoe or dish set. What is a reasonable return on investment? Why should a company be forced to stop making profits? When does it become the consumers responsibility to purchase with their morals rather than the best deal?

 

 

This is in "Introductions only", and absolutely way off topic, but as Loosehead once said, "Sometimes you just have to follow the conversation". Besides, I think the OP has inadvertantly raised several burning issues.

 

Smith, in essence, we are in agreement. A good example is the "Blundstone" work boot company, established in Tasmania in 1870. They were considered an Australian "icon", and were once the boot to have. For whatever reason, they packed up their machines, sacked all the workers, and moved to China. The public was outraged. Now I don't have any sales figures at hand, but I don't know anyone who buys Blundstone boots any more. Okay, so they created a hundred or so jobs in China, but in a country of 1.3 billion, barely a ripple. I just Googled them, and they have an impressive list of worldwide distributors, so I guess they are doing fine. I would love to see their Australian sales figures though. I would also like to know if the workers in China are paid a living wage, and if they enjoy the same safety standards as in Aus.

 

On the other hand, I have my internet and mobile phone bundled together with a company called TPG (a small, but I believe ethical company). For $95 a month I get 25 Gb, day or night, up or down, at a real speed of around 6 Mbits/sec, and $300 worth of cell calls. Their call centre is in Manila, and I love how happy, friendly, and efficient the operators are. Any glitches are fixed on the spot, and they are under no pressure. I know this because we often have lengthy, animated conversations, after telling him or her that my wife is a Filipina. It is obvious that these operators have a high level of job satisfaction, because their enthusiasm is genuine.

 

To get only 12 Gb (again, bundled with cell phone), minus the excellent service, from the major provider used to cost me $300/month. The only way the smaller players (like TPG) are able to offer such low prices is by outsourcing. (Incidentally, the major provider outsources to India, and yet still gouges multi-billion dollar annual profits). So the bottom line is whether or not the business owners have -- ethics --

 

I guess I'm just trying to say I object to people like the OP who view the Philippines as a resource to be taken advantage of (exploited), and expect every other westerner to feel the same way. Where my wife comes from, there are three main aspirations: to work in Manila, to work abroad, or to own a Motorela (the Mindanao version of a tricycle). Wouldn't it be fantastic if some ethical investors, who embrace the culture, and also paid a wage in line with overall profits, came to the Provinces and reduced the need, at least for some, to go anywhere but home, just to feed their families. For those expats who are married to Filipinas, and employ locals in their business, I am sure this is already the case.

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