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Oxtail Soup


rainymike

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rainymike

Oxtail (really cow tails) are a popular dish in Hawaii. It used to be really cheap as an undesirable meat for poor people, but as it grew in popularity prices have gone up. I notice that it is also quite expensive here (at Ayala) which might be because of the large Asian population in Cebu. My favorite is oxtail soup or stew. Here's the soup recipe.

 

1. Salt/pepper, then brown oxtails in oil. After browned, cover the oxtails with water and bring to boil, then simmer for an hour or more until the meat is very tender (a fork penetrates meat easily). Skim off excess fat that rises to the surface.

 

2. While simmering, toss in some ginger (2-3 4" pieces, skin removed). Add 1 piece of star anise (look in the Asian section at the supermarket). Add 1/2 - 1 cup of raw peanuts. Soak dried shiitake mushrooms in water then add to soup. Before the soup is done, add some cabbage and remove the star anise.

 

3. Serve soup with/along side rice. Dipping sauce is soy sauce with finely chopped/grated ginger.

 

Simple, relatively cheap. Pretty yummy as long as you can get over the fact that you're eating a part of the cow that most wouldn't consider eating. I made this for a pinoy friend who had made a chicken sayote soup for me. I think we both enjoyed each other's soup.

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udonthani

I notice it's quite expensive which might be because of the large Asian population in Cebu.

 

it's amazing isn't it, there being a large Asian population in Cebu. Coincidentally, I noticed there were large Asian populations in Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok also. It was such a surprise. I wasn't expecting there to be any Asians in Asia.

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I notice it's quite expensive which might be because of the large Asian population in Cebu.

 

it's amazing isn't it, there being a large Asian population in Cebu. Coincidentally, I noticed there were large Asian populations in Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok also. It was such a surprise. I wasn't expecting there to be any Asians in Asia.

 

I'm shocked. What you revealed to me was once unknown.

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oxtails are great .. love em .. but they are expensive pretty much everywhere in the states now .. least everywhere i've been in a long while

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A_Simple_Man
it's amazing isn't it. . .

 

What IS amazing is how an Ox Tail is directly over an Ox's ass and The opening post is directly over your post. . . Amazing what conclusions might be drawn there.

 

Its double amazing that the product of said Ox's ass is equivalent to the value of that post. Wow

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Panserhansen
Oxtail (really cow tails) are a popular dish in Hawaii. It used to be really cheap as an undesirable meat for poor people, but as it grew in popularity prices have gone up. I notice that it is also quite expensive here (at Ayala) which might be because of the large Asian population in Cebu. My favorite is oxtail soup or stew. Here's the soup recipe.

 

1. Salt/pepper, then brown oxtails in oil. After browned, cover the oxtails with water and bring to boil, then simmer for an hour or more until the meat is very tender (a fork penetrates meat easily). Skim off excess fat that rises to the surface.

 

2. While simmering, toss in some ginger (2-3 4" pieces, skin removed). Add 1 piece of star anise (look in the Asian section at the supermarket). Add 1/2 - 1 cup of raw peanuts. Soak dried shiitake mushrooms in water then add to soup. Before the soup is done, add some cabbage and remove the star anise.

 

3. Serve soup with/along side rice. Dipping sauce is soy sauce with finely chopped/grated ginger.

 

Simple, relatively cheap. Pretty yummy as long as you can get over the fact that you're eating a part of the cow that most wouldn't consider eating. I made this for a pinoy friend who had made a chicken sayote soup for me. I think we both enjoyed each other's soup.

 

Ox tail soup is an underestimated dish. But you need to cook it for 3-5 hours, until you can scrape the meat from the bones with a spoon. It can be prepared in many different ways. I like to add some onions, carrots and the last two hours, some cabbage. I think it's best when you heat it up again the next day.

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rainymike
What IS amazing is how an Ox Tail is directly over an Ox's ass and The opening post is directly over your post. . . Amazing what conclusions might be drawn there.

 

Its double amazing that the product of said Ox's ass is equivalent to the value of that post. Wow

 

LOL ... it's okay, I know what he meant. My bad actually, I was referring to the large Japanese and Korean populations here. Should have been specific.

 

And for Panzer, yeah it's a few hours to cook. The tails here are smaller than in the states though and seemed to take less time, but I'm not a clock watcher ... I kind of cook by intuition and inspiration. Seems to work well for me 90% of the time. The other 10% is when I decide I have to eat out for the evening.

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I had some oxtail steaks in the Tap Room one night that were outstanding.

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Hmmm ... I've never had mungo beans in soup, might give it a try. Only experience with mungo beans before was cooking it with some pork to make something like pork and beans.

did you add coconut milk on it - most fil mungo recipes is with coco milk and and malungay leaves. as i cannot get malungay leaves in where i live - i substituted it with chop spinach. its as equally delicious...

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When we cook karekare we boil the oxtails the day before, then refrigerate the meat and broth. The fat solidifies and can be lifted off easily.

 

In the US we sometimes find slightly less expensive oxtails at the "Suermercado" Mexican markets.

 

KareKare, rice and bagoong, yummy!

Edited by hoz
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I notice it's quite expensive which might be because of the large Asian population in Cebu.

 

it's amazing isn't it, there being a large Asian population in Cebu. Coincidentally, I noticed there were large Asian populations in Shanghai, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur and Bangkok also. It was such a surprise. I wasn't expecting there to be any Asians in Asia.

 

Sometimes even falling off a log isn't so easy.

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Oxtail (really cow tails) are a popular dish in Hawaii. It used to be really cheap as an undesirable meat for poor people, but as it grew in popularity prices have gone up. I notice that it is also quite expensive here (at Ayala) which might be because of the large Asian population in Cebu. My favorite is oxtail soup or stew. Here's the soup recipe.

 

1. Salt/pepper, then brown oxtails in oil. After browned, cover the oxtails with water and bring to boil, then simmer for an hour or more until the meat is very tender (a fork penetrates meat easily). Skim off excess fat that rises to the surface.

 

2. While simmering, toss in some ginger (2-3 4" pieces, skin removed). Add 1 piece of star anise (look in the Asian section at the supermarket). Add 1/2 - 1 cup of raw peanuts. Soak dried shiitake mushrooms in water then add to soup. Before the soup is done, add some cabbage and remove the star anise.

 

3. Serve soup with/along side rice. Dipping sauce is soy sauce with finely chopped/grated ginger.

 

Simple, relatively cheap. Pretty yummy as long as you can get over the fact that you're eating a part of the cow that most wouldn't consider eating. I made this for a pinoy friend who had made a chicken sayote soup for me. I think we both enjoyed each other's soup.

 

Nice recipe mike but need to add plenty of onion and garlic when browning the ox tails. For a cheaper version use beef bones from the market and do your own verison of the cebu favourite pochero.

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