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What does Binisaya mean?

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kc8ual

What does Binisaya mean?

 

Some people define the word as "In Bisaya", but is that what it means?

Others define it as the "Way of the Bisaya", but does the word mean that?

 

Let's break this word down a little bit to its root. Bisaya is the root of Binisaya and it can refer to the people of the Visayas or to the language of the visayas.

 

Binisaya is an infixed word that features the infix -in- which is denoted by the fact that -in- can only be used after the first consonant and before the following vowel.

 

Take Tagalog for example:

 

walay = house : winalay = spider web

pampang = rock : pinampang = rocky place

sobu' = urine : sinobu' = bladder

tee = feces : tinee = intestine

 

However I do not believe it to be used as a noun so these last examples would be useless. Let's take a look at adjectives though:

 

sundu = supernatural : sinundu = supernatural power

sodu = far : sinodu = distance

lasu = hot : linasu = heat, temperature

basag = strong : binasag = strength

lanji = beautiful : linanji = beauty

 

In this case, we can see that using Bisaya as an adjective and infixing it with -in- would show fondness, propensity and habit. This is because the infix -in- is the equivalent of the prefix hing- which can be conjuncted as him- or hin-

 

If this were the case, then that would mean Binisaya is a noun derived from the adjective form of Bisaya which is used to describe the people and/or the language of the region; even though Bisaya is also a noun defining the people and language of the Visayas. In which case, the easiest way of looking at the definition of Binisaya would be that of "The Way of the Bisaya", "As It Is Done In Bisaya", or "As they Say/Do in Bisaya".

 

I seem to think that in general form, when the term is used, the "As They Say in Bisay" would be the most common concept of the word.

 

Well you know what they say... "When in Rome, do as the Romans do", here you can say, When in Sugbo... Binisaya!

 

Anyone else's thoughts?

 

-Nick

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2_little_time
Take Tagalog for example:

 

walay = house : winalay = spider web

pampang = rock : pinampang = rocky place

sobu' = urine : sinobu' = bladder

tee = feces : tinee = intestine

 

 

Anyone else's thoughts?

 

-Nick

 

What dictionary are you using?

 

house = bahay

rock = bato

urine = ihi

feces = tae

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Angie
What does Binisaya mean?

 

Some people define the word as "In Bisaya", but is that what it means?

Others define it as the "Way of the Bisaya", but does the word mean that?

 

Let's break this word down a little bit to its root. Bisaya is the root of Binisaya and it can refer to the people of the Visayas or to the language of the visayas.

 

Binisaya is an infixed word that features the infix -in- which is denoted by the fact that -in- can only be used after the first consonant and before the following vowel.

 

Take Tagalog for example:

 

walay = house : winalay = spider web

pampang = rock : pinampang = rocky place

sobu' = urine : sinobu' = bladder

tee = feces : tinee = intestine

 

However I do not believe it to be used as a noun so these last examples would be useless. Let's take a look at adjectives though:

 

sundu = supernatural : sinundu = supernatural power

sodu = far : sinodu = distance

lasu = hot : linasu = heat, temperature

basag = strong : binasag = strength

lanji = beautiful : linanji = beauty

 

In this case, we can see that using Bisaya as an adjective and infixing it with -in- would show fondness, propensity and habit. This is because the infix -in- is the equivalent of the prefix hing- which can be conjuncted as him- or hin-

 

If this were the case, then that would mean Binisaya is a noun derived from the adjective form of Bisaya which is used to describe the people and/or the language of the region; even though Bisaya is also a noun defining the people and language of the Visayas. In which case, the easiest way of looking at the definition of Binisaya would be that of "The Way of the Bisaya", "As It Is Done In Bisaya", or "As they Say/Do in Bisaya".

 

I seem to think that in general form, when the term is used, the "As They Say in Bisay" would be the most common concept of the word.

 

Well you know what they say... "When in Rome, do as the Romans do", here you can say, When in Sugbu... Binisaya!

 

Anyone else's thoughts?

 

-Nick

Let me finish my Scrabble game, Nick and I'll share my thoughts with you later.

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Angie
Take Tagalog for example:

 

walay = house : winalay = spider web

pampang = rock : pinampang = rocky place

sobu' = urine : sinobu' = bladder

tee = feces : tinee = intestine

Where did you get these words, Nick? I don't want to think that I am still too young to know the words used by my ancestors.

 

If these are Tagalog words, then the definitions are wrong.

house = bahay

cliff = pampang

urine = ihi

feces = tae

intestine = bituka[/color]

 

The definitions you wrote are like Cebuano words but with wrong spellings. The Cebuano for intestine is "tinai" And the word sobu' with the mark that you used, means sad. How did it become urine?

 

What are these words???? I haven't read or heard of these words as Tagalog

[/size]

sundu = supernatural : sinundu = supernatural power

sodu = far : sinodu = distance

lasu = hot : linasu = heat, temperature

basag = strong : binasag = strength

lanji = beautiful : linanji = beauty

 

sundo = fetch

lasu = I don't know this word

basag = a Tagalog word used to describe a broken thing as in basag na pinggan (broken plate)

binasag = a passive verb in Tagalor meaning broken by someone.

lanji = what is this word? maybe landi from the word "malandi which means flirt"

 

In this case, we can see that using Bisaya as an adjective and infixing it with -in- would show fondness, propensity and habit. This is because the infix -in- is the equivalent of the prefix hing- which can be conjuncted as him- or hin-

 

Basically, if the infix "in" is used with verbs, it means that something is done in the way of the verb thus making it an adjective.

 

Ex. prito = fry ------ pinirito = fried

suwat = write ------ sinuwat = written

 

Can you give me a word with the infix "in" that shows fondness?

 

The Prefix "hing" shows fondness as in hingatawa (fond of laughing) from the verb "katawa" you get rid of the K when you attach the prefix hing.

 

him + the noun babayi = himabayi which means womanizer (fond of womanizing)

 

If this were the case, then that would mean Binisaya is a noun derived from the adjective form of Bisaya which is used to describe the people and/or the language of the region; even though Bisaya is also a noun defining the people and language of the Visayas. In which case, the easiest way of looking at the definition of Binisaya would be that of "The Way of the Bisaya", "As It Is Done In Bisaya", or "As they Say/Do in Bisaya".

 

Bisaya is basically a noun, Binisaya is an adjective. Normally, if you hear people saying "Binisay-a" it means that the speaker is asking the listener to say or explain things in Bisaya. Binisaya is the adjective which means that something is done, presented, spoken or written in Bisaya.

I seem to think that in general form, when the term is used, the "As They Say in Bisay" would be the most common concept of the word.

 

Well you know what they say... "When in Rome, do as the Romans do", here you can say, When in Sugbu... Binisaya!

 

Anyone else's thoughts?

 

-Nick

Edited by Angie

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2_little_time

Either this is a joke, or if he is serious, maybe he is NOT the one that should be writing a Cebuano guide to grammar and vocabulary.

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kc8ual

When I say Tagalog, I am referring to the language spoken by the Tagalog people and not to the national language which is recognized as Filipino. I feel that in order to learn the language properly, I have to start from the beginning. I have a list of more then 1,500 old bisayan words and some scans of baybayin texts to get me started. Just think, 400 years ago basag would have been pronounced ba-sa as there where no single consonants.

 

The similarities between fondness, propensity and habit make them synonyms with each other.

 

Fondness: A strong inclination or preference...

Propensity: A natural inclination or tendency...

Habit: A dominant or regular disposition or tendency...

 

The concept is an inclination or tendency for or of something; which can be both a good and a bad thing depending on how it is used.

 

Binisaya is the adjective which means that something is done, presented, spoken or written in Bisaya.

 

Binisaya is an inclination or tendency to do something as a Bisayan whether it is "done, presented, spoken or written". Based on your own interpretation, which lines up with the usage of the infix properly, then the obvious and simplest meaning of the concept of Binisaya would translate more closely to "as they say or do in Bisaya".

 

There is 3,761 affixes in the Visayan language alone. Modern Visayan uses less then 10% of them.

 

Keep in mind that while I'm trying to learn most of these words, I have found that most Filipino root words are concepts that cannot be readily classified as a noun or a verb, but rather as a concept or an understanding of a concept.

 

And 2_little_time, for someone who speaks English as first language, and cannot see the associations between fondness, propensity and habit, then it is a good thing that I am building this program because I can see it and simplify it and translate the word properly and completely. All Angie did was clarify and confirm my original thoughts on the actual meaning of Binisaya.

 

So when in Sugbo... Binisaya! :P

 

-Nick

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2_little_time

Nick,

 

Whatever, as long as you are happy. That's all that matters.

Kinda like learning the dead language of Latin, to see why we say some of the words we use everyday.

It all makes sense now, at least to me.

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Angie
When I say Tagalog, I am referring to the language spoken by the Tagalog people and not to the national language which is recognized as Filipino. I feel that in order to learn the language properly, I have to start from the beginning. I have a list of more then 1,500 old bisayan words and some scans of baybayin texts to get me started. Just think, 400 years ago basag would have been pronounced ba-sa as there where no single consonants.

 

Nick, the single consonant "g" would be attached to the last syllable. If it were a Cebuano word, it would just be divided into two syllables ba(CV) - sag(CVC).

 

You got me confused Nick because if people say Tagalog it's understood that they are referring to the Filipino language. Tagalog people have different languages as well, Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Ilocano are considered the languages of the Tagalog people. You should have made it more specific because we are talking about Cebuano here and using the language spoken by the Tagalog people and not the national language as a comparison will just confuse people more.

 

The similarities between fondness, propensity and habit make them synonyms with each other.

 

Fondness: A strong inclination or preference...

Propensity: A natural inclination or tendency...

Habit: A dominant or regular disposition or tendency...

 

The concept is an inclination or tendency for or of something; which can be both a good and a bad thing depending on how it is used.

 

Binisaya is an inclination or tendency to do something as a Bisayan whether it is "done, presented, spoken or written". Based on your own interpretation, which lines up with the usage of the infix properly, then the obvious and simplest meaning of the concept of Binisaya would translate more closely to "as they say or do in Bisaya".

 

The infix "in" Nick is commonly used to change a noun into an adjective that shows how things are done. The prefix "hing" is more commonly used to describe people, not things. You cannot equate the use of "in" with "hing" because they are used in two different contexts.

 

There is 3,761 affixes in the Visayan language alone. Modern Visayan uses less then 10% of them.

 

Keep in mind that while I'm trying to learn most of these words, I have found that most Filipino root words are concepts that cannot be readily classified as a noun or a verb, but rather as a concept or an understanding of a concept.

 

And 2_little_time, for someone who speaks English as first language, and cannot see the associations between fondness, propensity and habit, then it is a good thing that I am building this program because I can see it and simplify it and translate the word properly and completely. All Angie did was clarify and confirm my original thoughts on the actual meaning of Binisaya.

 

So when in Sugbo... Binisaya! ;)

 

-Nick

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kc8ual

The Baybayin script, did not have single consonants, everything was CV and there was no way to make CVC, so the final C was dropped when writing. There was a secret as to how to guess what the dropped consonant was, but that dies with the last person who was able to fluently write, read,and understand Bayabayin.

 

Now as you stated, -in- is commonly used to turn nouns into adjectives:

 

saulog : n fesitval

sinaulog : adj like a festival (This is where Sinulog was derived from, they just dropped "a" altogether)

 

babaye : n girl, woman, female

binabaye : adj like a girl, womanlike, womanish, effemine, a metrosexual; (Binabaye si Hwan : John is like a woman)

kabinabaye : v to become like a woman, a homosexual male without a sex change

kababaye : v to become a woman, a homosexual male with a sex change

pakababaye : v to pretend to be a woman

 

***Bayut means a sissy. The word when being used to describe homosexuals is slang and derogatory***

 

lalaki : n boy, many, male

linalaki : adj like a man, manish, manly, boyish, a tomboy; (Linalaki si Hwanita : Juanita is like a man)

kalinalaki : v to become like a man, a homosexual female without a sex change

kalalaki : v to become a man, a homosexual female with a sex change

pakalalaki : v to pretend to be a man

 

bata : n child

binabata : adj childlike, childish, like a child (he acts "like a child")

 

baboy :n pig

binababoy : adj like a pig, pig-like, piggish (Binababoy si Hwan : John is piggish)

 

tawo : n human being

tinatawo : adj like a human, human-like (A werewolf takes on a "human-like" form during the day.)

 

mananap : n beast

minananap : adj beast-like, like a beast (On the full moon, a werewolf assumes a "beast-like" form.)

 

punthaw : n iron (the metal)

pinuthaw : adj like iron, iron-like (the ship had "ironclad" plates on its hull.)

 

Diyos : n God

diniyos : adj godlike (He had "godlike" powers.)

 

santik : n flint (the rock)

sinatik : adj flint-like

 

baki : n frog

binaki : adj like a frog, frog-like (The boy jumped "like a frog".)

 

In the case of hing- or its contractions him- and hin-, we change verbs into adjectives:

 

sulti : v talk, speak

hinulti : adj chatty, a fondness for speaking; talkative

 

To learn the language, you have two choices, you can learn to translate word for word in your head, but then if someone mispronounces something, you will not be able to understand it; or you can choose to do it right by learning the roots and the affixes. Learning how to spot infixes is the hardest, but once that is done, you take the root word, add any infixes to its meaning. Then from right to left, you add the meaning of any prefixes to the word one at a time. Then you add any suffixes meanings to the word. If you learn the roots, then when someone says something that you do not understand completely, you hear the root word and can determine what they are trying to say based on how it is used.

 

-in- is added to nouns to make adjective meaning "similar to", "inclined to", etc.

*** the infix -in- is used to modify nouns whereas the prefix hing- is used to modify verbs ***

ka- is added to an word to make it a verb meaning thing, a state or being of what the root implies.

pa- is added to an verb to make it causative, introduces accomplishment of the root.

paka- is pa- and ka- combined is added to a word to make it a verb which means either according to or contrary to the root (determined in context), meaning "to become unlike", "to pretend to become", etc.

 

In the case of Binisaya, we are starting with a root word which is both a noun and an adjective. By using the infix -in- for both the noun as well as the adjective, we are turning the word into an adjective; rather then making two separate adjectives:

 

binisaya : adj like Visaya

himisaya : adj a fondness for Visaya

 

We create one and assume both meanings together. Keep in mind that this type of infliction is rare, but it does occur.

 

-Nick

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Angie
The Baybayin script, did not have single consonants, everything was CV and there was no way to make CVC, so the final C was dropped when writing. There was a secret as to how to guess what the dropped consonant was, but that dies with the last person who was able to fluently write, read,and understand Bayabayin.

 

Now as you stated, -in- is commonly used to turn nouns into adjectives:

 

saulog : n fesitval --- Saulog basically means celebrate, kasaulogan is the noun meaning festival or celebration

sinaulog : adj like a festival (This is where Sinulog was derived from, they just dropped "a" altogether) --- Sinulog means celebrated. I know this for a fact, I was born in Cebu Velez General Hospital and I am a 100% Cebuana.

babaye : n girl, woman, female

binabaye : adj like a girl, womanlike, womanish, effemine, a metrosexual; (Binabaye si Hwan : John is like a woman) --- this must be how the word is translated but contextually binabaye means gay and is also used to refer to things that are used by or meant to be used by women only.

kabinabaye : v to become like a woman, a homosexual male without a sex change --- Take this sentence for an example. Kabinabayi g

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kc8ual

The book that has half of the words is the English-Cebuano dictionary by Rodolfo Cabonce. The understanding of Cebuano grammar is going slowly though since Ang Dila natong Binisaya is not available in English in its complete form.

 

I misspelled binata as binabata... oops... well I am learning :rolleyes:

 

binababoy was supposed to be binaboy; I made it up and its not in the dictionary, but its meant to mean that you eat too much or are becoming too fat... like a pig (an idiom) binaboy og singut

 

tinatawo = tinawo (another one I made up)

 

minananap is made up, but the context is there.

 

binaki (ok, let me try and hope I am close) Binaki ang lalaki nakalukso. (Like a frog, the boy jumped.) And now that you mention it, hanging rice does sort of look "like a frog" :D

 

pinunthaw means "of like iron" (from the dictionary verbatim):

 

ironclad, adj. (protected with iron plates) sinul'uba'g puthaw; pinuthawan...

 

There are 3,761 possible inflictions in the Cebuano language and roughly 30,000 root words in all. If only 10 possible inflictions could ever be used on any given word then you have 590.490 tredecillion or 590.490 x 10^42 possible word combinations in the Cebuano language. If you can use at least 50 inflictions on any given word then we are talking about 71,789,798,769.1852 tresvigintillion possible combinations (X 10^72) of words in the language.

 

The average person can remember no more then 12,000-15,000 word families (their personal vocabulary). William Shakespeare's vocabulary was estimated to be only 25,000 word families (almost the same word families in Cebuano). Through it he was able to write his masterpieces which have stood the test of time.

 

As long as you are taking the meaning of the root and through the proper usage of the inflictions to add to the root word's meaning (and creating a new word which can be inflicted again), you can create more words then actually exist currently currently in Cebuano dictionaries. Just because it is not printed and is not used in everyday speech does not mean that it is not an actual word assuming that when it is inflicted, it was done so in accordance with the rules set forth in the language and in accordance with the meaning of said inflictions.

 

-Nick

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Angie
The book that has half of the words is the English-Cebuano dictionary by Rodolfo Cabonce. The understanding of Cebuano grammar is going slowly though since Ang Dila natong Binisaya is not available in English in its complete form. --- My God! You have one of the most obsolete books in Cebuano.

 

I misspelled binata as binabata... oops... well I am learning :D

 

binababoy was supposed to be binaboy; I made it up and its not in the dictionary, but its meant to mean that you eat too much or are becoming too fat... like a pig (an idiom) binaboy og singut --- If you say this sentence "Nagbinaboy siya ug kaon." This means that the subject is eating in a very messy manner and is eating like a pig. And what does binaboy ug singut mean?

 

tinatawo = tinawo (another one I made up) = wrong

 

minananap is made up, but the context is there. = wrong

binaki (ok, let me try and hope I am close) Binaki ang lalaki nakalukso. (Like a frog, the boy jumped.) And now that you mention it, hanging rice does sort of look "like a frog" :lol: ---- The sentence should be "Nagbinaki ug lukso ang lalaki.

pinunthaw means "of like iron" (from the dictionary verbatim):

 

ironclad, adj. (protected with iron plates) sinul'uba'g puthaw; pinuthawan...

 

There are 3,761 possible inflictions in the Cebuano language and roughly 30,000 root words in all. If only 10 possible inflictions could ever be used on any given word then you have 590.490 tredecillion or 590.490 x 10^42 possible word combinations in the Cebuano language. If you can use at least 50 inflictions on any given word then we are talking about 71,789,798,769.1852 tresvigintillion possible combinations (X 10^72) of words in the language. ---- yes, but it does not mean that you can use all those affixes with all the root words that you can find in a dictionary.

 

The average person can remember no more then 12,000-15,000 word families (their personal vocabulary). William Shakespeare's vocabulary was estimated to be only 25,000 word families (almost the same word families in Cebuano). Through it he was able to write his masterpieces which have stood the test of time. ---- Yeah, he is pregnant with words but remember, in literary pieces, the writer can write anything because they have the poetic license that will allow them to write whatever they want without following grammatical rules.

 

As long as you are taking the meaning of the root and through the proper usage of the inflictions to add to the root word's meaning (and creating a new word which can be inflicted again), you can create more words then actually exist currently currently in Cebuano dictionaries. Just because it is not printed and is not used in everyday speech does not mean that it is not an actual word assuming that when it is inflicted, it was done so in accordance with the rules set forth in the language and in accordance with the meaning of said inflictions. --- What you are saying Nick is the same as applying all the rules in all the words that you can see in the dictionary. Yeah it's possible you can always attached prefixes, suffixes and infixes to all the words you want but there is still a question regarding their usage. Take these English prefixes for an example, im, un, in, they all mean not but can you say unpolite, inpolite? NO! the prefix im is the one that is used with the word polite. Another one, can you say disconvenient, unconvenient, imconvenient? The prefix "in" is the most appropriate. It's the same thing with the Cebuano language, you cannot apply all the rules with the same word. In Sociolinguistics, some people take a single rule and use it with all structures and since it's the whole community that is using it, it has become acceptable among them but is not acceptable or is considered wrong when they use it outside of their group. I've heard and seen a certain group of people using this structure; I was, You was, He/She was, We was, You was, They was. Grammatically, this is wrong but since it's acceptable among them, they did not bother unlearning this colloquial language structure. You can always coin words based on the rules, Nick but remember, there is no such thing as absolute rule.

 

I am not going to correct again whatever you want to write here Nick, I am trying to help but you want to insist on what you think is right. So, good luck on that.

-Nick

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kc8ual
I am not going to correct again whatever you want to write here Nick, I am trying to help but you want to insist on what you think is right. So, good luck on that.

You only corrected me once and that was to fix a sentence I put in the wrong order.

 

Everything else you said other then the "wrongs" were all in agreement with my findings.

 

William Shakespeare did write grammatically correct as do most authors, because they have to if the want their stories to be understood. Shakespeare wrote in what is known as inversion which was common to middle and late English as he lived several hundred years ago. He has contributed more then 7,000 words to the English language over his career.

 

In the word important, the use of the prefix "UN" is based on the fact that important is Latin-derived and therefore the proper Latin-derived affix has to be used; not because it sounds better that way.

 

As for those words that you insist were wrong, here is the proof you asked for, for clarification. Depending on their usage, they were all correct. Forgive the incorrect Cebuano spellings, you can blame Mr. Wolff for those.

 

The infix -in-

 

“Manner of”

 

1) To an adjective base

Nganu gu ng imu man aku ng gisugu niana ng daku ng binuang?

Why did you send me on that foolish errand?

 

In this case, buang "fool" is changed into binuang "foolish"; in context it means “in the manner of a fool”

 

2) To a derived base

Dili ka gyud mulampus niana ng dinautan mu ng paagi.

You will never succeed in your evil ways.

 

In this case, dautan "bad" is changed into dinautan "evil"; in context it means “in a bad manner; evil”

 

3) To noun base

Naluuy siya sa babaye ng alaut ug iya ng gitagaan sa iya ng inigsuu ng tambag.

She pitid the unfotunate woman and gave her some sisterly advice.

 

In this case, igsuun "brother or sister" is changed into inigsuu "brotherly or sisterly"; in context it means “as a bother/sister would”

 

“Manner of” special meanings:

 

1) Way of speaking

Na unya ni ng tawu ng Amerikano kumu wala kaila bisan siya maalam mubinisaya ngalingkud lang diha sa daplin.

Then, this American having no friends, though he spoke VIsayan well, just sat in the corner.

 

In this case, bisaya "Visayan" is changed to mubinisaya "speaking Visayan"; this is what started the thread.

 

2) From the or of the

Dawata kini ng aku ng kinasingkasing nga pahalipay kanimu.

Accept my sincere congradulations to you.

 

In this case, kasingkasing "heart" is changed to kinasingkasing "from the heart; sincere"

 

“Something that has been accomplished”

Dagha ng nakakita ug nanumpa gayud nga may hikut nga linama sa liug an mananap.

Many saw and swore that the animal wore a dyed thread around its neck.

 

In this case, the word lama "to die" becomes linama "dyed"; “dyed” is the completed act whereas “to die” is ongoing

 

1) To a derived base

Dili maayu ang aku ng kinatulug kagabii.

I did not have a good sleep last night

 

In this case katulug "sleep" becomes kinatulug "slept"; In context, sleep can be used in all moods in English, but in Cebuano we would add the –in- infix to denote completion.

 

2) One who was ___ed

Nakigkita ang sinumbung sa iya ng hinigugma sa wala pa siya isulud sa karsil.

The accused person went to see his beloved before he was put in jail.

 

In this case the word sumbung "tell on or report" is changed into sinumbung "accused" and the word higugma "love" is changed into hinigugma "beloved"

 

3) Past tense

Gitagaan siya ni nanay g inasin nga karni.

Mother gave him some salted meat.

 

In this case asin "salt" is changed to inasin "salted"

 

Sila ng tanan gipapasan sa manga butang nga wala nila hibali g unsa manga kinahun ug uban pa ng karga

All of them were made to carry things they did not know what; crated, and other materials.

 

In this case kahun "box" is changed into kinahun "crated"

 

 

“Something that has been accomplished” special meaning

Hinumdumi laman nga aduna y usa ka binuhat nga kanunay naghandum kanimu.

Just remember that there is a creature who always remembers you.

 

In this case the word buhat "make" is changed in to binuhat "creature (anything created, especially a living being; a person controlled by another";

 

“Continuous Action”

 

1) Continuous action of

Taud-taud na ng sinamid ni inting sa iya ng linantip.

Inting had been sharpening his bolo for a long time now.

 

In this example, the root of samid which means to sharpen is infixed with -in- to create sinamid meaning "continuous sharpening".

 

2) Continuous sound of

Unya gipulihan sa hinatub ug linagubu daw usa ka panum nga kabaw nga nakabuhi sa turil.

Then it was replaced by the continuous booming and thudding sounds like a herd of carabao

 

In this example, the roots of lagubu which means boom and hagtub which means thud, are infixed with -in- to create linagubu "continuous booming" and hinagtub "continuous thudding"

 

3) Continuous quality of

Wala siya makatulug tunud sa dinagaang sa iya ng lawas.

He could not sleep because of the fever in his body.

 

In this example, the root dagaang meaning warmth is infixed with -in- to create dinagaang "continuously warm" or simply a fever when used in the context of the sentence.

 

-Nick

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2_little_time

Nick, seriously, you need to get out and enjoy the Philippines a bit more.

Do you really think anyone really cares about this stuff?

 

I am not trying to attack you or start something with you, just a genuine concern

that I think you are taking this all too seriously.

 

Hey, I could be wrong, as you seemed to have "investors" lining up to give you

their money to pursue this stuff, and you all feel there is a viable market for it.

 

Me, personally, can't even get past the first few sentences before my brain freezes over.

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kc8ual

To be truthfully honest, I have been here for four years now and have attempted time and time again to learn Cebuano, but have never had any luck. In the last several weeks, just from focusing on the basis of the language and of course picking up any number of the dictionaries which now clutter my living room, I can put together rather rudimentary statements that my wife understands.

 

My daughter is bilingual and she is learning both English and Cebuano. I feel as if it is only appropriate to be able to do so as well. If my daughter walked up to my wife in a couple years and asked one of those never ending "why" questions, especially with regards to Cebuano, my wife would never be able to answer them. It is my duty as a father to be able to answer just about any question my child can throw at me and that includes questions regarding Cebuano.

 

Am I taking it seriously? Well of course I am. It is my life now living here in the Philippines. Every time I use a new Cebuano word, I see my wife's face light up. Every time I can manage to put together a statement, to her it means the world even if I am not speaking to her. To my daughter, is it not appropriate to be able to speak with her in what ever language she feels most comfortable speaking? Or is taking my family serious a wrong thing to do?

 

As you stated yourself, you cannot even get through the first few lines without your brain freezing over. You have to look at what is available... Absolutely nothing. There are very few guides or books that will teach you more then just phrases through memorization. Most of the stuff is either written for a Filipino and not technically tailored to a foreigner, or it is older then I am and a lot about the words of the language have drastically changed since their printing.

 

For the record, the book upon completion will be called "Napasayon nga Bisaya" which basically translates into "Visayan made as easy as possible" but in order to make it as easy as possible, I have to learn it all; and in as short of time as I possibly can. Semantically speaking, I can learn the grammar a whole lot faster then I would ever be able to learn the actual words. Give me math, patterns or the like and I can break it down, but the words take some effort. I may not be able to learn all the words available in the dictionaries I have at my disposal any time soon, but I can learn through the grammar books, the structure of the language and then break it down into the simplest form possible.

 

I am not saying that there is even any market for it. I am doing it for several reasons:

 

1) Because someone asked me to do it.

2) Because I want to learn and the fastest way to learn is to teach as I go.

3) Some people want to learn as well but have come across too many obstacles along the way.

4) If I do not learn something new every single day, then I will have wasted the entire day for no reason.

5) Because I love seemingly impossible challenges.

6) I love my family and want them to be happy and through speaking Cebuano I can do that every time I open my mouth.

 

I could go on forever, but the point is that even if there was not anyone interested, I would still be doing it. Even if one person had not invested, it would not have slowed me down; the only difference is that you would never have known it was being done until it was already released. But that is no way to do anything because I am but one person and what may work for me will not work for others, and through the investors, I can gather information on what changes need to be made along the route to completion.

 

-Nick

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