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Good luck with your venue.

 

So I have thebob and Diver Douglas as well as Paul coming on the 8th. I would still like to see three more investors in this project. You know, there is a lot more to this project then just the Cebuano Grammar and Vocabulary books. The main reasons I am doing these are 1) because I was asked if I could and 2) because the money generated by these books would help to cover what I really want to do. Now I had not planned to expound on the main portion, but some times I guess you have too.

 

To date, there are more then 30,000 titles considered to be classics of English Literature. There is not one member of this forum that cannot honestly say that they have never read a book in their entire life, nor is there anyone who cannot remember having a favorite book. Even my lawyer had the opportunity of having the Hardy Boys while growing up. Now, many of you have had the opportunity to stop by and check out the book stores here... The national Bookstore is not even a book store, they are an educational supply store. While they may have books in stock, take a serious look and see how many of them are for Filipinos. A Filipino who wants to read only has one choice, they have to read English Novels which can cost as much as half a week's income which is totally unfair to them and also makes it only available to the well-to-do. NB does have a Filipino section, but it is a very small one at that and still overly priced. Power Books is a book store, but just like the National Bookstore, their stocks are limited to mostly English books.

 

The exception to this are the cheesy romance novels sold in the department stores. The Best Friend's Place series and similar books. They are really cheap and are in Filipino, but they are romance novels... cheesy and sleezy ones at that. Not suitable for any Filipino under the age of at least 12 and deffinitely not suitable for boys.

 

I always hear people on the forums and around town talking and complaining that you need to be careful stating a business because Filipinos will just copy you. So the real question you need to be asking is why do they copy? Well to be honest, books have been shown to play an important role in the development of one's imagination and creativity skills. This of course is not to say that Filipinos as a whole lack creativity and imagination, because I have met many really creative Filipinos (the vast majority of them though grew up in semi-wealthy to wealthy households).

 

I think it would be appropriate to do something no one else believes will do anything. Imagine Lewis Carrol's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in Filipino, Cebuano, Illocano as well as bi-lingual versions of those languages. Printed afford ably and made to be available at an affordable price. A Filipino child could actually read this book in their own language and understand it. A Filipino adult could read the bi-lingual version to become more fluent in English. A foreigner could read the bi-lingual version to become more fluent in a Filipino language and it gives all of a way to narrow the gap between us and our Filipinas.

 

Now at the same time, imagine 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Journey to the Center of the Earth, White Fang, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, Sherlock Holmes, as well as 29,000+ other books that we all had the privileged of growing up with, translated to Cebuano, Filipino, Illocano and several other major Filipino Languages. With most of the books selling for less then P50 each.

 

But this is where the problem lies. 30,000 books being translated to only one language, Filipino, Would take a team of 100 translators a total of more then 6 years to translate them all at an estimated cost of labor totaling more then P42 million. So for me, the finishing of these two books means that I will be able to introduce the classics of English literature in translated forms to Filipinos sooner. I will have a means of paying for more translation work as time goes on. For other people, these two books means finally being able to fulfill a demand for something that us as foreigners have been seeking but have yet to find appropriate and significant information on. Of course those who have already chosen to invest in the project have their own reasons for investing, but those are theirs whether it be for the 20% return, the free copies of the Vocabulary and Grammar books before their release or even any bi-lingual books that are created before repayment is made.

 

The investment is for the Cebuano Grammar and Cebuano Vocabulary books which are expected to be available online in e-book format before the end of this year. These will be fully searchable documents that anyone can use and is expected to be made available for P2,500 or $50. It is expected to work out to be 3 books (2 volumes for vocab) of 700 pages each. That is more then 5,000,000 words of information covering all aspects of vocabulary, grammar, syntax, morphing and much more. In exchange for the investment, any investors will get their investment plus 20% interest returned in 6 months or after the 100th book is sold online, which ever comes first. They will receive a copy of the Cebuano Grammar and Cebuano Vocabulary books before they are made available online or anywhere for that matter. Furthermore, once a printed form is available of both books they will get a free copy of those as well. Any bi-lingual books (translations of English literature classics to Cebuano) that are created between the finishing of those two books and repayment of the investment the investor's will receive copies of as well as the printed forms of those books as they are made available.

 

So an investment of P10,000 with 20% is a return of P12,000. On top of this you get the digital form of the Grammar and Vocabulary books at P2,500 for free. You get the printed forms of the vocabulary and grammar at ~P2,500 for free. and let's say that I can get 4 bi-lingual books finished between the vocabulary and grammar books and repayment of the investment, you will get those in digital as well as printed forms. Let's call those to be P50 each for ease which comes to P400. So all in all you get P2,000 cash, and P5,400 worth of pre-release copies of both the printed and digital forms of any book created during the investment period.

 

But Wait..... There's More.....

 

I had to throw that last part in because I think I was starting to sound like an infomercial which was not my intention, I am just very long-winded... But there is more... I have cookies.... don't you want a cookie? Yummy, tasty, crunchy and of stale course stale Filipino cookies. I will purchase a brand new busket, but I cannot guarantee their freshness. And yes, I did say busket... with an "s" in it... I do not know why and now you probably feel as if you have lost 10 minutes of your life that you will never get back.

 

Now, Because of the last post, I feel bad... I personally do not allow alcohol in my home for my daughter's sake. But, I figure that everyone loves a bit of brew from time to time, maybe for the next get-together in which repayment for the investments are made, I will have it at a restaurant that sells beer and of course pizza.... I want to see if Handuras Pizza is any good so I guess when it is time to repay the investments, to make up for cheesy tea and cookies, we can do repayment there.

 

-Nick

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Thirteen months have elapsed since Nick started this thread inviting members to invest in his Cebuano e-books project and he's had use of his investors' money for approaching one year. The money advan

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Paul
Now, Because of the last post, I feel bad... I personally do not allow alcohol in my home for my daughter's sake. But, I figure that everyone loves a bit of brew from time to time, maybe for the next get-together in which repayment for the investments are made, I will have it at a restaurant that sells beer and of course pizza.... I want to see if Handuras Pizza is any good so I guess when it is time to repay the investments, to make up for cheesy tea and cookies, we can do repayment there.

 

Just don't bring your daughter to the pizza place. She may not be able to stay off sauce. :D :D :D

 

God, that was soooo lame.

 

Sorry. I just had to do it.

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I'm interested I sent you a PM. It would be good to see the classics translated into affordable books nothing like sparking peoples imaginations. I'm not a big drinker about a dozen beers a year if I'm lucky thats why I don't have any friends :lol:

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So you are going to get Filipino kids to read/buy English classics translated into Tagalog/Cebuano? These are the same books that teachers have o force US kids to read?

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So you are going to get Filipino kids to read/buy English classics translated into Tagalog/Cebuano? These are the same books that teachers have o force US kids to read?

 

Not all kids were forced to read, nor do they feel as if they were forced to. Only a very small portion of them were. Most of the classics are not part of the standard curriculum neither. While some schools may ask students to read some books by say Jack London such as the Call of the Wild or White Fang, his works in general are considered to be 4th year college level material and would never be offered in public elementary, middle or high schools unless you attended advanced academic classes. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland I would also highly doubt was forced upon anyone considering you can get half of the story from Disney's Alice in Wonderland. Of course some kids may felt having been "forced" to participate in a William Shakespeare play or two, but seeing as though Filipinos love shows about witches or asawang, I am sure they would enjoy Macbeth.

 

I personally can only remember being "forced" to read one book in school, but I cannot remember the name of it, I doubt it constituted as a classic though. I remember being forced to write book reports on a regular basis, but a book report is not a book. Of course then again I never miss a release of a John Grishm book and usually finish reading the 400+ page book in a single sitting. Let's not forget that most of the "classics" of English literature were written prior to the 1900 during the Victorian Era when story books first made their way into the shelves of book stores. Very few new books can be considered to be classics but there are the exceptions. Many people will argue that the Book of Swords can be constituted as an instant classic. Furthermore, I would highly doubt that Harry Potter books would ever be considered to be classics because of thier intended publication being that of the film and not really the book, but I have been wrong before.

 

Most of what we consider to be the Classics were written long before one was able to see the film or watch a TV show or listen to a radio broadcast. But there are some exceptions to this such as Orson Well's War of the Worlds. I never enjoyed reading Pride and Prejudice, but then again I do not consider that a classic, it is just required reading. The same can be said for titles like the Catcher in the Rye. Of course then again for most US student, these books are old, we can watch the movie on TV and what not... but here they are not old at all. Ask some Filipinos and see how many can tell you who Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde are, ask them who Captain Nemo is, ask them about the Cheshire Cat or the Mad Hatter. You see, we know who they are because in the states during our childhood these names got used over and over again in an attempt to make one new cartoon or show or whatever. How much can one American take of Sherlock Holmes, Young Sherlock Holmes, the Great Mouse Detective and like several hundred others that have been developed over the years. Now go and ask a Filipino if they even know who Sherlock Holmes is... The title of To Whom the Bell Tolls and the more then 500 pages in the book will send shivers down any teenager's spine.

 

The simple point is, that if any kids in school felt as if they were being forced to read a book, it was because the book was not really interesting to read, but we were asked to read it because of the lessons contained within its pages. Remember, teachers can do some pretty stupid things like an English teacher asking you to read a 500 page book, not because it has a great plot line or exciting characters, but rather so you can learn proper grammatical structure of the English language. Furthermore, if the book contained characters in which the child is more then familiar with, they simply will not like it. So you watched the film Winnie the Pooh and saw all of the Saturday morning cartoons until you were 10 years old and you are tired of the name which means if you were asked by the teacher to read A.A. Miline's Winne the Pooh, you would feel as if it is being forced on you. You could not pay me a million dollars to get me to hire someone to translate War and Peace or Homer's Oddysey. Sure they may be great books, for the adult mind to understand, but no one will read them... or at least only a very small portion of the nation might try to pick one of them up to read. We are talking about the real greats like Samuel Clemens, Robet Luis Stevenson, Lewis Carrol and others that would forever fall in infamy.

 

Even though I have personally read more then a thousand books in my lifetime, I do not consider myself an expert in the field. But I do feel that these books which we are so familiar with, the Filipinos are not. If you ask a Filipino about Captain Nemo, Jekyl, Hyde, or other similar names, their first response will be the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (or the League as they refer to it) which is for most, the first and only time they have ever encountered these characters and still know nothing about them. Matter of fact, in films is the way most Filipinos have encountered most of these classical films. I showed a group of neighbors Disney's Alice in Wonderland. This group consisted of both male and female, adults and children. After the film I had my wife ask them if they would purchase and read the book that the film is based on. I also told her that the film is only half of the story as the other half would have made the film too long. About 70% of them said they would be interested as long as the price was affordable and as long as they could understand the book. The remainder of the group was undecided because they have never actually took the time to read. This final portion consisted mostly of the adult males and very few of the kids or women said they would not like to have the opportunity to read the book in Cebuano.

 

I have done this with other films and groups as well to include White Fang, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 20,000 leagues Under the Sea, Journey to the Center of the Earth as well as several others all with similar results. But hey, there is no point in arguing the case simply because you have already stated your opinion that you personally hate to read books. This is your opinion and as I tell other people; especially when they trend towards the opposite of the vast majority. Your opinion is for you only. Feel free to share it all you want, but it still does not effect the vast majority. I usually tell someone this with regards to the design of a website because all too often people want what they like, but not what has been shown that the vast majority prefers.

 

Hmm, midnight.... time for bed so g'night all.

 

-Nick

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I just wanted to inform everyone that I now only have room for one more investor. Once received I will not be taking anymore after that. In case anyone was wondering, no you do not have to attend the meeting/get-together to invest because I am more then happy to go over the highlights through PM. There are many things that I do not mention here on the forums that will also come along with investing, but for those who cannot make it I have sent PMs explaining them as well as those who will make it, they will be explained in-depth at the meeting. They are good things, and not requirements... Sorta bonuses if you would, for investing; like the free books in printed and digital form are bonuses.

 

-Nick

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Wirraway

Best of luck Nick with your project, but knowing a fair bit about printing and publishing, love to know how you woud pay translators and print some of the titles you mentioned and sell to people for P50 each is an impossible feat in my opinion, you also never mentioned how you are going to market them, but I can see you are a lover of books and your heart is in the right place, but there is reality as well, again all the best.

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Not all kids were forced to read, nor do they feel as if they were forced to.

 

I do remember assigned reading of classics....but you bring up another point. If not expected to read the classics, why would a Filipino read one?

 

 

Most of what we consider to be the Classics were written long before one was able to see the film or watch a TV show or listen to a radio broadcast. But there are some exceptions to this such as Orson Well's War of the Worlds.

 

War of the Worlds was written by HG Wells in 1898. That is before commercial radio and TV. It is arguably before radio.

 

About 70% of them said they would be interested as long as the price was affordable and as long as they could understand the book. The remainder of the group was undecided because they have never actually took the time to read. This final portion consisted mostly of the adult males and very few of the kids or women said they would not like to have the opportunity to read the book in Cebuano.

 

Great market research there. I just think that this, like many other "projects" you talk about, is long winded and out of touch with reality. I really hope that I am wrong.

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Paul

Well, at least it is going to be for a good reason. AND people will KNOW where the money is going, and what for. That, to me, is most important.

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Markham

This is a great project and one I'm supporting with my wallet as well as with my words. From personal observation, Filipinos are avid readers but "Mills and Boone" pocket romances aside, there's not much literature about - and those "Mills and Boone" novelettes are mostly in Tagalog anyway.

 

A good friend of mine asked me to bring copies of "Animal Farm" and "The Little Prince" back with me from the UK for his wife to read. Because these books contain stories on two levels, she's finding them harder to understand than if she had the Cebuano translations. On that theme, one idea that might work would be to republish some of the classics with both the English and Cebuano translation in the one book. This would greatly assist English-speakers learning Cebuano as well as native Cebuanos learning English.

 

 

 

Mark

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Paul

Slightly off-topic here, but still related:

 

A good friend of mine asked me to bring copies of "Animal Farm" and "The Little Prince" back with me from the UK for his wife to read. Because these books contain stories on two levels, she's finding them harder to understand than if she had the Cebuano translations. On that theme, one idea that might work would be to republish some of the classics with both the English and Cebuano translation in the one book. This would greatly assist English-speakers learning Cebuano as well as native Cebuanos learning English.

 

It's funny that you mentioned that, Mark. Over the years, people have known that I have books listed on many of my sites. (One of the books, which used to only be available in soft cover, but now thanks to Nick working on it for me, is available as an eBook. The book is English-Cebuano Made Easy, by Cristina Canonigo.) Anyway, another one of the books I used to sell, was usually sold locally because we were the only supplier at the time. Regularly, I would notice the wife or girlfriend of the purchaser spending time going through the book, while he and I were sitting and talking.

 

Even today, I donate a copy of English-Cebuano Made Easy to various restaurants I frequent, so the staff may improve their English skills and learn the English translations of particular Cebuano words. They often spend their idle/lunch time reading this book. Some I have noticed, are becoming a bit worn. I'm happy to see that happening. :lol:

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Well, at least it is going to be for a good reason. AND people will KNOW where the money is going, and what for. That, to me, is most important.

 

Yep, and that's why this is at the least, a worthwhile civic project that will improve the lives of people. is this a good business move? I don't think so but I really hope I am wrong. I think that those who have "invested" have done it as a project to help people throughout Cebu.

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My sole intention was never the Cebuano grammar and vocabulary books, but there is clear lacking of the information. It is not taught in school because it is not the "national" language and there is really no information out there on how to structure the sentences and the like. I was asked if I can build a language program and so I am. While it may not be "hooked on phonics" it will work for some, not just English speakers, but also Cebuano speakers. If you have ever taken the time to talk to a Filipino, you will know that even some of the most well-educated ones make regular mistakes when speaking. If they know the structure of their own language, being able to structure a second language is a lot easier.

 

I cannot see certain books selling here and nor will I choose books targeting certain groups. Not because I have anything against them, but simply because it makes more sense. Take one of the most popular classics of all times, To Kill a Mockingbird... apart from completely changing the entire story line to make the Caucasians in the book Filipino and the Black characters all named Joe, It would never work here because those lines are just not here and I doubt a Filipino would like a book which depicts them and us Kanos in the positions of the various characters in the book, I would get deported and black-balled for it :D

 

In general, I hope to focus on the books that 3-15 year olds would enjoy reading. This includes of course Aesop and Grimm for the younger generation and Jack London, Lewis Carrol, Samuel Clemens and many others for the older crowd. The Filipinos in my house love to read so much that they have read the same old cheesy romance novels several times over each and the books are falling apart at the bindings.

 

As Paul has stated, there is not really any books here in Tagalog and almost none in Cebuano other then Phrase books targeted for sale at us Kanos. Basically, the point being that how could anyone say that a project is not worth while because Filipinos will not like the same books that we had to read growing up, when they have almost nothing at all to choose from. I was in Mactan Gaisano today and other then the mostly English selection of books including The Adkins Diet (why would a Filipino need a diet, aren't they already one of the more malnourished people in Asia?) The selection of books in Filip[ino are very slim. There are many more available, but most are only available to schools and are for school subjects and not for enjoyment reading. I have never seen a Filipino not read a newpaper if handed to them even if it is in English. Matter of fact, I have been at carenderias and finished a newspaper and offered it to some of the other patrons and everyone grabs a section and starts reading. Of course this is not the same as a story book, but that is besides the point.

 

Just as Markham has said, the concept of making bi-lingual books that are also fun to read makes learning a new language more enjoyable. I grab a phrase book and scan over the pages but really pay no attention to it because it is boring. But a book that has both English and Cebuano on the same page that has a good story line and excellent characters I will read, attempt to read the other language several times over simply because I enjoyed the book. If anything, it will help us as foreigners to be able to better communicate with our Filipinas because we will be able to read the Cebuano portions to become more fluent and our wives will be able to read the English portions and so on.

 

Not everyone enters into a business to make millions because if that were the case then we would never have charities and everyone would be so greedy that it would cause the world to be in constant chaos. Sometimes it is the thought that counts and in this case, we are talking about helping us as foreigners to be able to better understand the native language here. It is respectful as well as fun because you will not feel so much as an outcast because you can communicate. Filipinos want to learn English. I could just say period, as there is really no reason to go into depth on this, but let's do. Every Filipino knows that it is the ones who can speak English the best that are able to make the best money. They want call center jobs and the ability to work over-seas. Everyone who is married her has on at least one occasion had a relative ask if they could speak to their son or daughter to help them on their English. Of course there are many more things I could discuss, but the point is mute. Filipinos want to be better in English, they sing karaoke, they do so many things on a daily basis to help them improve their skills, and this is just one of many possible options that can help them do just that as long as it is affordable to them.

 

But just as there are those in the states and in Australia and in Britain and every else in the world that hate to read; they would much rather use a book to hold up a wobbly table then ever open its pages; there will always be Filipinos that will not read books, but as in most other places of the world that has high literacy rates, these persons that hate reading are only the minority, and a small portion at that. Just because you may not like reading or may hate reading altogether, does not mean that you have to drive everyone else into the ground that does.

 

One thing that you absolutely positively have to keep in mind no matter what is... that this country has been controlled by people who want to keep the Filipinos stupid so that they can stay in power. For half a millennia, The Spanish had the Philippines as a colony. During this time period they opened no schools and actively refused to teach Spanish to the Filipinos other then those who were already considered to be the elite and powerful people of the country. The people today who run this country still want this. Keep the people suppressed through less then satisfactory educations (while we get ours over-seas) and keep them as slaves and peasants for us to get rich off from. This is completely unfair to the Filipinos. To say that it is a pointless venture to make books with exciting stories and adventures like no other that will engage ones mind, is to say that you are no better then those who have stolen, raped, and pillaged from the Filipinos for the last 500 years.

 

Weather or not it makes money is another story. If I fail, then I fail and I have to repay the investments out of my own pocket. If I fail then so what? Have I really lost anything at all? Or have I gained so much more. To judge one on what they have succeeded in half of the story. No one will ever succeed at everything they do every single time they choose to do something irregardless of what the intentions are. But does anyone thing anything different of them? Well hopefully not because when you get home everyday and turn on that lightbulb, do you think about the thousands of failures that went into its creation? The investments are P50,000 and with the repayment we are talking P60,000. I can make this easily in a month if I put my mind to it so no matter how you choose to look at it, it is my decision to either fail or succeed. Either way anyone who invests will be repaid in full. But, at the same exact time, everyone who has come to me wanting to invest, has said the same exact thing just in different words:

 

The project itself has good intentions and merit. It is able to enrich and empower the lives of the Filipino while at the same time give foreigners another option that will help them to become more fluent in Cebuano.

 

There is nothing at all with making available to an entire nation, something which has been held from them for centuries is there? Is there anything that can be so wrong about a book that would require it to be burned and forever lost to mankind? You know, I still go out for my walks every single day. I walk between 10km and 20km daily and stop off all the time to talk to Filipinos because they like having the conversation. Recently I have started asking them about books being written in Cebuano and filled with adventures and the what-not and the consensus is still the same no matter where I turn. There will always be book burners no matter where yo go that will never read anything, but the vast majority will still love to pick up an intriguing book from time to time. Irregardless of whether you live in a 1st world country built on freedom of rights, or whether you live in a 3rd world nation which just barely borders on the developing line; if there is a want, a desire to be more illiterate, and more in control of your own destiny, then there will always be a desire for a good book. In the Philippines I see the both of these, and for the Filipino who speaks English as a second language I see the desire even greater then someone who is native to speaking English and has grown to despise his/her language. English is the HARDEST language in the world to speak. Every rule we have in grammar, we have another rule to contradict it and in some cases another rule that will contradict both the first and second rules.

 

Yes, I am long-winded because I like to speak my mind. I speak only for myself and never for anyone else. And for me, the concept of making something available to the Filipinos which is almost not available here at all is important. There are people that are in love with one thing, money, and I am not one of them. Not everyone is greedy. Not everyone things that the only thing that is important in life is making a million or even a billion dollars. The thing I see in a greedy person when I meet them, is someone that will end up dying a lonely and cold death in which the only people that will show at their funeral are those that are hoping to be in the will. Some people cannot see past their nose and can never take their money of the concept of gold and are willing to step on everyone else in order to make that next penny. They are always willing to call someone else's ideas stupid no matter what they are simply because there is no money in it for them to make and so be it.

 

I would however like to point out that if you like to tell others that they will fail every time they try to do something, then please go to another thread and do it. I have never listened to advice like this and will call you out on it every single time. One thing I love to do more then anything else is to debate. I love a good intellectual debate but only if it is an intellectual one and not one which is merely blinded and one-sided. Now with this said, the thread does state "Seeking Investors" and if you are not interested in investing, then there is absolutely no point for you to keep visiting this thread and taking it off topic. I believe the concept is called trolling and it is also against the forum rules, but it is not my place to call you out on it because I am not a moderator and nor do I really care. Like I said, I love debating and Now it is time for a good rebuttal.

 

Your posts are directed towards nothing but making money. Your insistence that books are worthless here insinuates that you are no better then people like the owner of Sulpicio Lines who was more worried about collecting their insurance from the Princess of the Stars and pushing the blame to everyone else then the fact that there are hundred of dead people and even more worried family members who have been loyal customers for a long time and are responsible for your ability to purchase such a large ship. People like this do not care who they hurt as long as they make their next dollar. But the funny thing is that I am not surprised that people like this exist because I know that they do, what I am surprised at is the fact that they blatantly do not care who knows it. Is it better to be called a book burner, or to be called a tyrant? I would not like being called any of those. I personally would love being surrounded by friends and family on my deathbed who are thankful for the help and guidance I have provided them with over my lifetime. Money can buy you just about anything, it can give you a car, a house and yes money can even purchase you a Filipina, but nothing you can purchase can compare to having a trustworthy friend, a loving wife, both of whom will stick by you no matter what comes your way. To get those, you have to be willing to actually help someone out of the kindness of your heart and not because it is a tax incentive.

 

-Nick

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I always hear people on the forums and around town talking and complaining that you need to be careful stating a business because Filipinos will just copy you. So the real question you need to be asking is why do they copy? Well to be honest, books have been shown to play an important role in the development of one's imagination and creativity skills. This of course is not to say that Filipinos as a whole lack creativity and imagination, because I have met many really creative Filipinos (the vast majority of them though grew up in semi-wealthy to wealthy households).

 

I think it would be appropriate to do something no one else believes will do anything. Imagine Lewis Carrol's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland in Filipino, Cebuano, Illocano as well as bi-lingual versions of those languages. Printed afford ably and made to be available at an affordable price. A Filipino child could actually read this book in their own language and understand it. A Filipino adult could read the bi-lingual version to become more fluent in English. A foreigner could read the bi-lingual version to become more fluent in a Filipino language and it gives all of a way to narrow the gap between us and our Filipinas.

 

Bi-lingual books are not new here in the Philippines. I actually bought some before as a present for my friend who lives in the US. She wanted some Filipino myths and folklore stories for her daughter. The books are quite affordable, too. Less than 100pesos at National Bookstore.

 

http://www.adarna.com.ph/product.php?sortf...sc&itype=30

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2_little_time

I have been reading Nick's posts about his project to convert a manuscript to a usable format, and which he hopes will bring enough income to pay for the project and possible turn a profit.

 

I had to step in here and say that although his efforts are commendable, I seriously doubt that he will sell enough copies to even break even.

 

The manuscripts are no big secret. They are freely available on the internet.

Prof. John U. Wolff is quite noted for his work in all aspects of Philippine languages.

Cornell University is the depository of these documents, and any one can freely download a PDf copy of most of Prof. Wolff's work.

 

Looking over the document that Nick plans to revise and update, I highly doubt that many foreigners would want to spend the time reading that sort of information.

 

There is already a project started to update and provide for free some of Prof. Wolff's work at : URL Removed

 

 

Also, there are many free resources for learning the languages of the Philippines.

Defense Language Institute comes to mind, as well as all the documents one can find at the Cornell University website, the Mormon's Guide to Cebuano, and so many others that turn up in a Google search.

 

As to actually printing this manuscript and being able to offer it at a price to offset the printing costs is probably not even doable.

 

As to converting public domain books to Cebuano, and printing them for sale at 50 peso is probably not even realistic. What would be your marketing strategy ?

 

As a few others have said here, your heart is in the right place, but for this project ever to come to profit generating endeavor is highly unlikely.

 

Let me ask the readers on this forum, who would pay $50 for something they can get for free.

Also, how many on this forum are so interested in learning Cebuano, that they have progressed to the level that they need detailed explanation of proper grammar and syntax?

And for those that are learning Cebuano, have you even downloaded all the FREE info out there, and tell us all about your progress so far.

 

This book that Nick is working on, all 2,000 pages, is just something I can't even imagine someone sitting down to read.

 

Also, I am familiar with PDF, to make a document searchable, one must "capture" the document. To capture a document with cebuano words, would require the conversion program to have all those words in a dictionary. I doubt that Nick has that program with a cebuano dictionary.

 

One last note, all it takes is for one person to post all of your work to the many share sites (torrents, rapidshare, newsgroups, etc) to negate any hopes of selling any future copies.

 

Anyways, best of luck and I hope you investors realize at least a small return on your investment.

Visions of Perry Gamsby comes to mind with his fishball cart sheme.

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