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bret

construction in the Philippines

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bret

I plan to build my own dream house one day. Probably even before I really retire, so I am still working while constructing my dream farmette with main living quarters and assorted out buildings. I have read pretty much all I could find on the subject from ex-pats in the Philippines who documented their projects on-line.

 

I was wondering if any of you fine gents (or ladies) have any other reading/study suggestions, on-line or especially books on the subject. Beginner type books or tutorials are best at this point. I am curios about the proper ways, means and measures to frame forms for concrete footings and walls, using concrete blocks (hollow block), proper rebar configurations, concrete mixes, soil testing, foundation and Post/Beam concrete construction standards in the Fils. I have ordered some books on US standard methods, but doesn't seem there is much info or books available on standards in the Philippines. (maybe there aren't any.... :) )

 

I realize being able to spot craftsmanship and correctness on the job mostly comes from experience. Too bad I have none. I will be at the mercy of any general contractor I were to hire, since they could tell me "this is the way it's done" and I wouldn't really know better. So, I would like to at least study up so I am not completely retarded :D when it comes to dealing with trades people.

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Bukwali
I plan to build my own dream house one day. Probably even before I really retire, so I am still working while constructing my dream farmette with main living quarters and assorted out buildings. I have read pretty much all I could find on the subject from ex-pats in the Philippines who documented their projects on-line.

 

I was wondering if any of you fine gents (or ladies) have any other reading/study suggestions, on-line or especially books on the subject. Beginner type books or tutorials are best at this point. I am curios about the proper ways, means and measures to frame forms for concrete footings and walls, using concrete blocks (hollow block), proper rebar configurations, concrete mixes, soil testing, foundation and Post/Beam concrete construction standards in the Fils. I have ordered some books on US standard methods, but doesn't seem there is much info or books available on standards in the Philippines. (maybe there aren't any.... :) )

 

I realize being able to spot craftsmanship and correctness on the job mostly comes from experience. Too bad I have none. I will be at the mercy of any general contractor I were to hire, since they could tell me "this is the way it's done" and I wouldn't really know better. So, I would like to at least study up so I am not completely retarded :D when it comes to dealing with trades people.

 

Hi Bret, there are several books that you can find covering building construction in the Phillippines, I have at least six books rangeing from simple" building construction, site management, simple costing, Philippine building code, philippine fire code, philippine construction" If you search the net you'll find a free pdf file on philippine building code, I did post a link to it in the past but at present I'm not in the philippines so cant access my computer to dig it out, I'll be back in a week or two, and I can post the link and book titles then.

 

John

Edited by Bukwali

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bret
Hi Bret, there are several books that you can find covering building construction in the Phillippines, I have at least six books rangeing from simple" building construction, site management, simple costing, Philippine building code, philippine fire code, philippine construction" If you search the net you'll find a free pdf file on philippine building code, I did post a link to it in the past but at present I'm not in the philippines so cant access my computer to dig it out, I'll be back in a week or two, and I can post the link and book titles then.

 

John

 

Thanks John.

 

I have googled a lot, but maybe I am just not hitting the right key words to coax out any appropriate data off the net. Would be great to have actual book names and links. Will wait for your posting in a couple weeks then.

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Bukwali
Thanks John.

 

I have googled a lot, but maybe I am just not hitting the right key words to coax out any appropriate data off the net. Would be great to have actual book names and links. Will wait for your posting in a couple weeks then.

 

I just had a quick look and found this [see below] there is pdf doc for this somewhere, when I get back I'll send you the book titles and ISBN Numbers

 

http://www.chanrobles.com/republicactno6541.htm

 

John

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bret
I just had a quick look and found this [see below] there is pdf doc for this somewhere, when I get back I'll send you the book titles and ISBN Numbers

 

http://www.chanrobles.com/republicactno6541.htm

 

John

 

Thanks John.

 

I found that as well, but didn't see how to down load the building code. I also searched National Book store on-line...no luck. There is supposedly a .PDF available on-line, but the only links I find for that are broken.

 

Wasn't sure that the building code would be "laymen" enough for me anyways. I was looking for some beginner type books or docs that I can use.

 

Thanks for the assist.

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DeezNuz

We just finished building a house for my Aunt in which I was monitoring the entire project. A lot of red tape to go through with permits and occular inspections, but if you're patient things easily gets pushed through in no time.

 

 

post-5388-1247567727_thumb.jpg

 

post-5388-1247567767_thumb.jpg

 

 

My family has been in Construction for quite some time (in the US). Search McLarenUSA in google.

 

One thing I noticed here is the quality in which the laborers build things. If you must use a contractor, stay onsite daily to monitor their work. They love using concrete here but most do not know the proper methods in laying/tying re-bar and proper quantities to use in cement. You gotta remember that most of these laborers live in huts or plywood houses in the province, so unless you show them the proper way to do it, they'll do it wrong. Most of the Engineers/Contractors you hire won't really know what to monitor unless you go with one of the large construction companies here.

 

Here are some tips:

 

1. Use heavy equipment as much as possible. For the foundation work, employ a Mini-Excavator (2-5 ton capacity) with a back-fill blade. It can get the foundation prepped in half the time and half the expense of laborers. Especially if they have to work in limestone. Rentals usually go for $75 a day, with operator.

 

2. Bring a concrete vibrator and portable self-powered tools. Don't buy them here.

 

3. Do not let them Hand-Mix the cement. Always use a cement mixer. Rent one.

 

4. When using hollow block, make sure to get it from a good supplier. There are many back-yard hollow block manufacturers that have terrible product. Better yet, buy a former for $200 and make them yourself.

 

5. I recommend insulating the hollow block to aid in sound proofing, add strength and help with insulation.

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D_D

Don't use hollow block.

 

I built my house using 3D panels.

Cheaper, Faster to install, better insulation rating, just as if not even stronger than hollow block.

 

They used the same technique for the new Cebu Doc building in the North Reclamation area.

 

Here is more info ....

http://www.tridipanel.com/

http://www.3dsmartstructures.com/products/tridi/index.html

http://www.3dsmartstructures.com/faq/

Edited by Diver Douglas
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bret
We just finished building a house for my Aunt in which I was monitoring the entire project. A lot of red tape to go through with permits and occular inspections, but if you're patient things easily gets pushed through in no time.

 

 

post-5388-1247567727_thumb.jpg

 

post-5388-1247567767_thumb.jpg

 

 

My family has been in Construction for quite some time (in the US). Search McLarenUSA in google.

 

One thing I noticed here is the quality in which the laborers build things. If you must use a contractor, stay onsite daily to monitor their work. They love using concrete here but most do not know the proper methods in laying/tying re-bar and proper quantities to use in cement. You gotta remember that most of these laborers live in huts or plywood houses in the province, so unless you show them the proper way to do it, they'll do it wrong. Most of the Engineers/Contractors you hire won't really know what to monitor unless you go with one of the large construction companies here.

 

Here are some tips:

 

1. Use heavy equipment as much as possible. For the foundation work, employ a Mini-Excavator (2-5 ton capacity) with a back-fill blade. It can get the foundation prepped in half the time and half the expense of laborers. Especially if they have to work in limestone. Rentals usually go for $75 a day, with operator.

 

2. Bring a concrete vibrator and portable self-powered tools. Don't buy them here.

 

3. Do not let them Hand-Mix the cement. Always use a cement mixer. Rent one.

 

4. When using hollow block, make sure to get it from a good supplier. There are many back-yard hollow block manufacturers that have terrible product. Better yet, buy a former for $200 and make them yourself.

 

5. I recommend insulating the hollow block to aid in sound proofing, add strength and help with insulation.

 

 

Thanks for the tips Big Bob. Nice house.

 

I was thinking about making the blocks myself (more accurately buying the gear and supplies and having a laborer do it with my inspection), since the typical local block is such poor quality. I was reading about a gentleman living near Iloilo who bought some property in a field and had a pretty good narrative on his "hollow block" experience. He ended up having one of the local producers manufacture blocks to his specs (40 blocks per bag of concrete rather than the typical 70 blocks). http://goiloilo.com/our-house-project-cement-blocks/

 

Regarding "adding insulation" to the hollow block. How is that done? Any links?

 

Since you have construction experience did were you the general contractor or still hired one? If you acted as general contractor, how did you find quality subs?

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DeezNuz
Thanks for the tips Big Bob. Nice house.

 

I was thinking about making the blocks myself (more accurately buying the gear and supplies and having a laborer do it with my inspection), since the typical local block is such poor quality. I was reading about a gentleman living near Iloilo who bought some property in a field and had a pretty good narrative on his "hollow block" experience. He ended up having one of the local producers manufacture blocks to his specs (40 blocks per bag of concrete rather than the typical 70 blocks). http://goiloilo.com/our-house-project-cement-blocks/

 

Regarding "adding insulation" to the hollow block. How is that done? Any links?

 

Since you have construction experience did were you the general contractor or still hired one? If you acted as general contractor, how did you find quality subs?

 

We hired a contractor to do all the major work. The important thing to consider in finding a contractor here in Phil, for each phase of the house is to be able to see the work they have done in the past. The reputable ones will be happy to refer you to past clients and would also have pictures of jobs they've done. If you don't know where to start...the best place is to go into any of the high end subdivisions, find a few of the hosues being built that you like and talk to the foreman. While on the site you can get a good idea of the quality of their work. You can then really see if they use more modern methods of construction. Example...the very good ones use power tools such as a air/electric chisels, the others would use a nail driven in to a PVC pipe and a hammer.

 

When it comes to things like the windows, carpenter for the wodden fixtures, ceiling tile, etc...I recommend you find your own versus using the guys the contractor recommends (they always would recommend their family members and sometimes they aren't that good). The contractor we hired has a brother that does electrical work was OK, but the cousin that does the carpentry work was terribly slow and the quality of the work wasn't that good. Note that most of the places you buy your building supplies can offer some good suggestions on the local talent and most companies can install themselves. For our windows, we used Kima Glass and they did all the installation (custom windows). The same went for the roofing tiles, they offered installation.

 

As for the hollow block. Definately make your own if you can find the formers. Most of the block you can buy here in Cebu use a terrible mixture of Portland, water and sand. Its cheaper to make, very pourous and weak. We always used Cement, Water, Sand, Rock mixture to make it a bit more dense, stronger and less pourous. As for the filler, use sand or the dirt dug out for the foundation. It's cheap and works well. Your house will be stronger, insulates from the heat much better and would keep out the noise from the traffic, cat in heat, roosters in the morning, dogs yapping, etc...

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D_D
Regarding "adding insulation" to the hollow block. How is that done? Any links?

 

 

One thing I noticed here in the Phils is they fill solid the Hollow Block. Hollow Blocks are suppose to be left hollow. The air between is the insulator.

 

Did you read my post above ?

 

Using 3D panels you will have 2 inches of Styrofoam in the middle and 2 inches on of concrete covering the steel mesh. Using 3D panels will give you a much better insulation than hollow block.

 

The Phils are so way behind on Green Building construction... Hollow blocks are so 90's !

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andy

what was the cost of building using these 3d panels. as i went on the website but it dos not show much or prices?

 

but the site does look nice?

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DeezNuz
One thing I noticed here in the Phils is they fill solid the Hollow Block. Hollow Blocks are suppose to be left hollow. The air between is the insulator.

 

Did you read my post above ?

 

Using 3D panels you will have 2 inches of Styrofoam in the middle and 2 inches on of concrete covering the steel mesh. Using 3D panels will give you a much better insulation than hollow block.

 

The Phils are so way behind on Green Building construction... Hollow blocks are so 90's !

 

 

Hey man, there's nothing wrong with the 90's. ! I still wear a 90's hair dew. I even saw this guy sporting a mullet sitting at the Bo's coffee the other day. He seemed pretty confident regardless of how goofy he looked.

post-5388-1247661371_thumb.jpg

 

Actually, hollow blocks can be left hollow if they were made to the proper dimension. Here in the Philippines, they're half the size of the US type and weak as hell. Leaving them empty is ok should you like keeping the windows and doors open all the time. We built one of our houses in George using 8" hollow block and filled it with saw dust. Was a great insulator and help kept the sound of the cows grazing in the pasture next to the house out.

 

Typical US 8" Hollow Block

post-5388-1247660168_thumb.gif

 

I used the 4" shitty type they have here in the Philippines to build the sound proofing wall in my office at Sykes (we're situated right next to the Gen Set). Since they don't have 8-inch type, we spaced the 4" block about 5-inches from the wall, reinforced it with steel re-bar for support then filled the block with sand. When the power goes out and the generator kicks on, it's nice an tolerable to the point of being able to speak normally with our customers on the phone.

 

Now regarding the 3D panels. Im not versed with the stuff. They used it to build the Sykes building and since it's a large structure, needed to be reinforced with 18" wide I-Beams for support. Only a year later, the walls are cracking to hell, insulation property is terrible to the point that small bugs are able to make it through certain connection points. Last year they had to begin re-insulate the building by pasting on foam to the outside of the building because the heat came right through the walls (All the employees in the call center above us were complainging about it. Although, they ran out of budget and had stopped the project). I don't know how good the stuff is in residential applications, but I could see it being OK if you have the columns in the house built properly and used 'Concrete-O-Bond' :P all over each panel.

 

Damn...Phil has a good number of 'GREEN BUILDING' Techniques. Look at all the shanties in the squatter areas. People re-use plywood that have fallen off the trucks, pieces of cut up slipper to patch the holes in the walls and even old taurpoline Tanduay Rum banners for roofs. Even in the provinces you'll see people living in grass huts. :rolleyes::rolleyes: Can't get much greener than that...granted, should a storm pass through, they'd need to rebuild.

Edited by CebuSportFishing

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Bukwali

Just as another building option I made this post back in 2007, I did cost the panels at the time and they did come out a little more expensive per m2 than 4" HCB, however I may use them in a project when I return in a few weeks, because the panels are relativly light I could use them as party walls over a non load bearing areas on the second floor.

 

 

http://www.livingincebuforums.com/inde...nsulated+panels

 

john

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bret
Don't use hollow block.

 

I built my house using 3D panels.

Cheaper, Faster to install, better insulation rating, just as if not even stronger than hollow block.

 

They used the same technique for the new Cebu Doc building in the North Reclamation area.

 

Here is more info ....

http://www.tridipanel.com/

http://www.3dsmartstructures.com/products/tridi/index.html

http://www.3dsmartstructures.com/faq/

 

DD, I've gone through the links on the TriDanel .Looks similar to SIP panels (although sans wood products) that are commonly used for Timber Frame construction.

 

Have you or others used this system for a residential build in the Philippines?

 

Any contractors you are aware of that do residential/small building work using this product?

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bret
One thing I noticed here in the Phils is they fill solid the Hollow Block. Hollow Blocks are suppose to be left hollow. The air between is the insulator.

 

Did you read my post above ?

 

Using 3D panels you will have 2 inches of Styrofoam in the middle and 2 inches on of concrete covering the steel mesh. Using 3D panels will give you a much better insulation than hollow block.

 

The Phils are so way behind on Green Building construction... Hollow blocks are so 90's !

 

Yep, I read your post on the pre-fab panels.

 

I thought for insulation you were referring to Hollow Block insulation method. I know hollow block can be filled with a Grout mixture made on-site (not to be confused with grout for tiles). I see others use various other substances. For a strong wall, seems rebar and grout is preferred. I assume if the wall is not load bearing due to post and beam construction, then it is not necessary to reinforce and fill hollow block, except with maybe insulating material.

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PiRider
I assume if the wall is not load bearing due to post and beam construction, then it is not necessary to reinforce and fill hollow block, except with maybe insulating material.

 

What happens when we assume? we look like asses! We live on the ring of fire prone to earthquakes, you need re-bar in all hollow blocks, Verts and Horz, and leaving the hole empty to say that is insulation is absurd. dont listen to half of these armchair builders! if you do your house will come tumbling down on top your family like a house of cards.

 

 

 

Its good you want to educate yourself to shake out the chaff.

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smokey
What happens when we assume? we look like asses! We live on the ring of fire prone to earthquakes, you need re-bar in all hollow blocks, Verts and Horz, and leaving the hole empty to say that is insulation is absurd. dont listen to half of these armchair builders! if you do your house will come tumbling down on top your family like a house of cards.

 

 

 

Its good you want to educate yourself to shake out the chaff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

do you have pictures of all the houses you have built?

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PiRider

How did I know Rober51 was lurking around, its off topic.

 

There are some really good builders and engineers here in the Philippines just ask around and trust but verify.

 

Like a previous posters stated look for projects in progress, they are masters of cover up for a good looking final piece of crumbling crap six months after you paid. educating your self is your best and wises defence.

 

in 2004 I calculated to build a nice house to MY comfort standards is $20 a sqft. in the rural province.

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smokey
How did I know Rober51 was lurking around, its off topic.

 

There are some really good builders and engineers here in the Philippines just ask around and trust but verify.

 

Like a previous posters stated look for projects in progress, they are masters of cover up for a good looking final piece of crumbling crap six months after you paid. educating your self is your best and wises defence.

 

in 2004 I calculated to build a nice house to MY comfort standards is $20 a sqft. in the rural province.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So your advice on building is gained by means other then personal experience? Did you build that house at 20 US a square foot? If yes show us the pictures so we can better understand the correct building procedure? i also dont want to listen to all of these armchair builders ... thank you for your time

Edited by robert51

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PiRider

To answer your question, Personal experience, licensed General contractor (not in PI) and I have no interest in doing so. No I wont post pictures of my house. I have nothing to prove. If you dont want my advice dont read it and delete it from your brain. Its that simple.

 

The 20 a sqft was based off an actual build, in 2004. I was my own general contractor, material supplier, banker, Master electrician, general plumber, Block maker, Welder, bought all my own tools and equipment, equipment operator. I hired local skilled and unskilled labor as well as a pc200 excavator for the foundation. We all have different tastes so prices may very. it took six months from breaking ground to move in. It was 2500 sqft, or 348 750 697 500 000 000 squaremicroinches, two floors and a 28foot roof height. I made some mistakes and learned alot, it was my first attempt to build in the Philippines, thats why I started with this small building prior to building my house. My suggestion as well is to start with a small out building first then expand from there. Since then I have built our house and a couple more.

 

Another secret I will let you in on. Making your own blocks is ok, but the quality of sand and material used is more important then anything.

 

Don't pay in cash for labor, it so easy to make this mistake. I had all workers apply for a BDO account, then I set them up as a third party on my BDO online banking, all monies paid to my contract labor and workers were transferred from my account to theirs in their name, so I have a record. Workers have an Atm card so their wives can spend it all the second the transfer was done.

 

I should add all my buildings and houses are built to withstand 155 mph sustained wind speeds gust to 190 and seismic zone four earthquakes. That's all I could get the engineer to sign off on, even though the calculations came out higher.

Edited by PiRider

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DeezNuz
So your advice on building is gained by means other then personal experience? Did you build that house at 20 US a square foot? If yes show us the pictures so we can better understand the correct building procedure? i also dont want to listen to all of these armchair builders ... thank you for your time

 

$20 a Square foot, that's cheap. This house we built is 2,152 square feet and cost approximately $50 a square foot to build, but that includes all fixtures, landscaping, custom cabinetry, custom windows and even the furniture and appliances.

 

I have two lots that I will be building on in the next year or two. Plan on building a 4,000+ square foot two story house and I estimated it at USD$100 per sqft which . The challenging and expensive part about this build is that both my lots are on a cliff face. So I'll have to bring in a big Excavator and hammer attachment to build a secure foundation in the limestone. I just hope the guy operating the machine doesn't fall off the side of the mountain. That's a nice 200 foot drop.

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PiRider

Big Rob did you use a contractor, or did you manage it all yourself? thats a biggie in cost.

 

Answered my own question, I see in your previous post you used a contractor for the major work,

 

This is where I saved a bundle on the cost. they like to jack up the material costs, labor costs, and overhead. amounting in a huge increase in price per sqft, I am sure with the experience you have you kept it to a minimum , but still they had to make something.

 

Also the peso was at 56:1 and cement was 150 a bag when I built.

Edited by PiRider

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DeezNuz
Big Rob did you use a contractor, or did you manage it all yourself? thats a biggie in cost.

 

Answered my own question, I see in your previous post you used a contractor for the major work,

 

This is where I saved a bundle on the cost. they like to jack up the material costs, labor costs, and overhead. amounting in a huge increase in price per sqft, I am sure with the experience you have you kept it to a minimum , but still they had to make something.

 

Also the peso was at 56:1 and cement was 150 a bag when I built.

We used a contractor, but purchased all the material ourselves.

 

If we had them manage the purchasing portion, we may as well pulled down our drawers and bent over.

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PiRider

Alternative building materials. Lets start with Blocks and panels.

 

I have to say I must be lazy; I am always looking for some way or new product to save me time, money, energy. After all these posts I dont think I have to remind anyone that I lived in the disaster capital of the world. So when considering any building product, I account for extreme seismic activity, high winds, big waves, and heavy snow loads. Ok just kidding about the snow loads, just checking if youre paying attention. If it snows in the Philippines would someone please send me a suitcase because I'm moving further south.

 

In the modern areas of the world alternative construction is becoming popular and mainstream, with increasing shortages of natural resources/materials and the increase in price, the world is changing. "Alternative building" isn't just about using natural materials, either. A whole gamete of ideas and features come in play. The ideal alternative building material offers design flexibility, environmental responsibility, energy efficiency, long-term structural integrity and durability, and most importantly lower home operation and maintenance costs. I have built with expanded polystyrene Blocks and panels now for over 15 years. The industry name is (ICF) insulating concrete forms. There are several companies out there offering these types of products. Here are a few links to some. Thermasteel used to be called Radva, for Radford Virginia, The new website doesnt do any justice, it sucks. I have become great friend of the family and inventor, they sold it a few years back, but his son actively works in the industry in Alaska ,Russia, Iraq, and Philippines.

 

http://www.thermasteelcorp.com/index2.html

 

http://www.polysteel.com/

 

http://www.quadlock.com/

 

http://www.reddiform.com/

 

http://www.premereforms.com/

 

The ICF flexibility, environmental responsibility, energy efficiency, long-term structural integrity and durability, and most importantly lower home operation and maintenance costs. Due to their high thermal mass, ICF's have a very high insulating capacity and can often result in cooling costs lowered by as much as 50% to 80% as well as the reduction in size of the AC (air conditioning) equipment needed in the home. In addition it provides outstanding noise reduction and its bullet proof. Hey you never know in todays world. I have lived in my house I constructed along time ago, it has survived several Super typhoons, huge earthquakes and a bulldozer strike, and I know you want to hear how a bulldozer hit my house. Well, while clearing the jungle behind our house on a Caterpillar D5MXL, I hit a swam of wasps, they were really pissed at me for dozing their house, and were on the warpath. Before I knew what it was I was stung 10-15 times. I quickly jumped off the dozer running away with the wasps in close pursuit. The dozer slowly chugged its way to the house where it ran into the back wall. As I heard my neighbor screaming I realized my house was being dozed. It had hit the wall and started to dig the tracks into the mud when I jumped aboard and pulled it into neutral. Yes there was some damage but only to the exterior plaster and foam, so it was easily repaired. Dont try this with your wood frame home.

 

From the outside our house looks like any other house in the area. When friends visit the comment on how comfortable inside the house feels. I explain to them that there is 7 1/2 inches of foam between them and the concrete on the roof and walls. If you ever have the chance in a tropical area to feel the concrete ceiling in a house at 6-9 pm in the evening the temperature of the underside will be around 100 degrees f. Why have a concrete roof you ask. In our area to attain insurance the house must have a concrete roof. So if you want a mortgage, you must have insurance. Get the catch 22. People have tried the high reflective white paint to some degree of luck. In my opinion it's a Band-Aid at best. Just do it right the first time. Now in the Philippines I have said the need to go to this extreme is not needed, on my shop we have engineered a Metal roof that is insulated for far less than a concrete roof. But it will need maintenance from time to time unlike the heaver brother. There are several plants in the PI that produce polystyrene foam insulation and other products but just not the ICF and engineered panel. They could easily do this with minor modifications and additional molds. Why they Dont, I Havent the answer . I am still looking. I plan to visit the factories when I get a chance. It is hard to teach an old dog new tricks. The problem with shipping the finished product from the States is basically you are shipping air, expensive air. I believe the first step in becoming less dependent or if you want to completely disconnect from the grid is to lower your consumption as much as possible, this will pay tenfold if you think about producing your own electricity.

 

 

Thats my take on it, I wrote this piece back in 2004.

Edited by PiRider

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smokey
$20 a Square foot, that's cheap. This house we built is 2,152 square feet and cost approximately $50 a square foot to build, but that includes all fixtures, landscaping, custom cabinetry, custom windows and even the furniture and appliances.

 

I have two lots that I will be building on in the next year or two. Plan on building a 4,000+ square foot two story house and I estimated it at USD$100 per sqft which . The challenging and expensive part about this build is that both my lots are on a cliff face. So I'll have to bring in a big Excavator and hammer attachment to build a secure foundation in the limestone. I just hope the guy operating the machine doesn't fall off the side of the mountain. That's a nice 200 foot drop.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We bought a lot to build a mc mansion but change out minds to many hassles, but the lot is 4400 plus sq meter and on a baranguy road right behind the subdivision pacific view estates... I think I will go condo...

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