Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Pazific_Dreamz

Differences Between Cebuana And Tagalog?

Recommended Posts

Pazific_Dreamz

I have picked up a few words in tagalog - but I wonder what the differences between tagalog and cebuana really are?

 

:as-if:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CaptainJackson

I know enough to know that many words in one don't carry the same meaning in the other.

 

One word you might say as a compliment may have a derogatory meaning in the other.

 

Where are you planning to stay when you visit PI. Concentrate on the language spoken there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ilovecebu

Well, If you know Spanish, then you can pick up words, since about 15% are Spanish words

 

Cuarto, Cuchara, mesa, silla, tenedor, guapo, bruja, chismes, toalla, chismosa. etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bet_Busta

To expound on what Talisayus mean, here are some words with different meaning:

 

Langgam: in tagalog it means ant, in cebuano bird.

Cebuano is advance, while it is still crawling in Manila, it is already flying in Cebu.

 

Paa: in tagalog it means foot, in cebuano thigh.

Cebuano is still advance as he is already closer to heaven.

 

Upa: in tagalog to pay, in Cebuano to hve sex.

The Manileno is still paying, we are already on top of her.LOL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pazific_Dreamz
To expound on what Talisayus mean, here are some words with different meaning:

 

Langgam: in tagalog it means ant, in cebuano bird.

Cebuano is advance, while it is still crawling in Manila, it is already flying in Cebu.

 

Paa: in tagalog it means foot, in cebuano thigh.

Cebuano is still advance as he is already closer to heaven.

 

Upa: in tagalog to pay, in Cebuano to hve sex.

The Manileno is still paying, we are already on top of her.LOL.

 

:as-if:

 

That is crazy!

 

I see what you guyz mean - I was told that "baliw" means crazy... But "baliw" seems to be a dangerous word to use - suddenly "Ako si baliw" - which should mean "I am crazy" - means "I am ugly" !? And "Ako ay baliw" means "sounds good" !? Weird! "baliw" goes from "crazy" to "ugly" to "good"!? very strange indeed. I was told that this is cebuana - but I think that it might be tagalog?

 

I prefer to understand and speak both cebuana and english. I want to know what is going on...

 

My spanish ain't no good though - it kinda narrows down to "Hola"... ;0)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
vampy_lane

I was 6 years old when I first been to Cebu, my grandpa was still alive that time.

 

I said I want to poo poo in tagalog Natatae ako.

 

Then my grandpa said, MALIBANG KA - in tagalog Malibang ka, means to have fun, or have some fun. So I said, I want to s*** and why my grandpa asking me to have some fun.

 

Langgam in tagalog means ANTS but in Visayan Dialect Langgam means BIRDS.

 

When my grandpa said look at those langgam, I was looking down while he was looking up. :as-if:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CaptainJackson
Upa: in tagalog to pay, in Cebuano to hve sex.

The Manileno is still paying, we are already on top of her.LOL.

 

 

:crack-up::lmao::lmao:

 

That's a good example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
klml

tagalog or pilipino is the national language and is used in luzon region while cebuano is used in visayan region

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Torestre

Still would be interesting to see some statistics about the size of the languages though. I am not sure if Tagalog necessary is much bigger than Bisaya. Remember all those people migrating to the Manila area whose native language really is Bisaya.

 

Anyone knows anything about this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
crewsafe
Still would be interesting to see some statistics about the size of the languages though. I am not sure if Tagalog necessary is much bigger than Bisaya. Remember all those people migrating to the Manila area whose native language really is Bisaya.

 

Anyone knows anything about this?

 

I would think that Tagalog is actually very small as a first language, when compared to the major dialects:

 

1) Bisaya (widely spoken throughout the Visayas).

2) Ilocano (spoken throughout much of Luzon).

3) Wari sp? (spoken in the Samar region).

4) Kampampagan sp? (spoken mainly in Pampanga & Tatrlac).

 

Did I leave any of the major dialects out?

 

It seems that Tagalog is just used in the Metro-Manila area & here in Subic as a primary "First dialect." IMHO.

 

Considering that there are something like 80+ dialects here,I would still vote for English to be the common bridge that brings peoples from throughout the islands together. This would allow for the native vernacular to be prominent in a certain region, with English as the second language...in such a way that Singapore adopted. :as-if:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Sibbick

The word that gives me the biggest laugh is Mahal

 

In Tagalog, it is love. In Bisaya, it is expensive.

 

It is funny reading on discussion groups where foreigners with tagalog girlfriends are talking about their Mahal. And I agree, she probably will turn out to be expensive :crack-up:

 

Their are differences within the languages too. Different islands have different spellings for the same word or most of the language is the same but they will have a few different words only spoken locally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
crewsafe
The word that gives me the biggest laugh is Mahal

 

In Tagalog, it is love. In Bisaya, it is expensive.

 

It is funny reading on discussion groups where foreigners with tagalog girlfriends are talking about their Mahal. And I agree, she probably will turn out to be expensive :lmao:

 

Their are differences within the languages too. Different islands have different spellings for the same word or most of the language is the same but they will have a few different words only spoken locally.

 

Actually Tagalogs use the word "Mahal-Mahal" for expensive also...at least that has been my experience. :crack-up:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sperry
Actually Tagalogs use the word "Mahal-Mahal" for expensive also...at least that has been my experience. :cool_01:

 

Well they say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing and Im probably going to prove it here but :

 

mahal means expensive in taglog too

mahal also means love in cebuano too

 

and I think mahal-mahal means "very expensive2 rather than just expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
WujouMao

i think i'll rather stick to learning basic tagalog. saying the word mahal kita is somewhat easier to say than Gihigugma ko ikaw in Cebuano

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AlbinoPrincess
To expound on what Talisayus mean, here are some words with different meaning:

 

Langgam: in tagalog it means ant, in cebuano bird.

Cebuano is advance, while it is still crawling in Manila, it is already flying in Cebu.

 

My closest friends in Cebu are actually from Iloilo. While I was visiting them last year in Boracay where they now live, my friends daughter and nieces decided that they should teach me Tagalog, Cebuano and Ilongo. :why-me: I found out that what is ant in Tagalog and bird in Cebuano is also mouse in Ilongo. :lmao:

 

The biggest language mistake I made while in Cebu was to say "Wala ko kasabot" to a couple of ladies from Iloilo. As I am sure you know, in Cebuano "Wala ko kasabot" means "I don't understand". Anyone know what it means in Ilongo? In Ilongo, "Wala ko kasabot" means "I have no pubic hair". :D My face was SO red. I was SO embarrassed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Sailfish Bay Fishing Charters

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..