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SIM Cards will need to be registered - It's now the LAW.


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to_dave007

Marcos signs into law SIM Registration Act

It’s official.

Filipinos must now register their SIM cards with their telcos after President Marcos signed Republic Act No. 11934, or the SIM Registration Act, into law in Malacañang on Monday, October 10, in an attempt to intensify government initiatives against scams and crimes committed through text and online messages.

President Marcos signs the SIM Registration Act in a ceremony in Malacañang on October 10, 2022. 

In signing the measure, Marcos noted that the government will finally achieve the long overdue goal of having an effective means of regulating the issuance of SIM cards to curb the spread of spam text messages and scams.

We will soon be able to provide law enforcement agencies with the tools needed to resolve crimes perpetrated with the use of these SIM Cards, as well as providing a strong deterrence against the commission of wrongdoing,he said.

Truly, the legislation is going to be welcomed by many of our people, especially now with reports of the commission of various crimes using mobile phones, including the proliferation of text scams and spam,he added.

President Marcos said that the signing of the law has set the important tone that it is the government’s policy to ensure that technology will only be used to improve people’s lives.

Under the Sim Card Registration Act, every public telecommunication entity or direct seller shall be required to demand end users of SIM cards present a valid identification document to validate their identities.

Among the information required from end users are:

Full name
Complete address
Date of birth
Sex
Cellphone number of the SIM card and serial number

Some of the valid documents they can present are:

Driver’s License
Philippine National ID
SSS/GSIS Card
UMID Card
Passport
Senior Citizen’s Card
NBI Clearance
Police Clearance
Firearms License
Voter’s ID
TIN ID
PRC ID
IBP ID
OWWA ID
Government Office ID
PWD Card
School ID (for minors)

The law requires public telecommunications entities (PTEs) to maintain a SIM Card Register of their subscribers, containing the required information. They must also submit a verified list of their authorized dealers and agents nationwide to the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC), with updates every quarter of the year.

To cover all users of SIM cards in this act, PTEs are mandated to ensure the registration of existing prepaid SIM card subscribers within a prescribed period. An earlier version of the law prescribed 180 days.

Failure to comply results in the grant of authority for telecommunications entities to automatically deactivate services to the specific SIM card subscriber.

Foreigners in the Philippines also have to register their SIM cards. They need to provide their personal information and passport number and present any of the following documents:

  • Return or departure ticket (for tourists)
  • Passport
  • Proof of address in the Philippines
  • Alien Employment Permit
  • Alien Certificate of Registration ID
  • School registration ID (for students)
  • Other pertinent documents

The registered SIM cards of tourists are only valid for 30 days.

Data privacy

In his speech after signing the law, President Marcos assured the public that the information they will provide to PTEs will be treated confidentially.

With this, he reminded the people that the use of false or fictitious information, the use of fictitious identities, and the use of fraudulent documents or identifications to register a SIM card shall be dealt with by appropriate penalties.

Crucially as well, included in this crucial piece of legislation are provisions that make paramount the protection of confidentiality and data privacy rights of subscribers, which shall begin to take effect at the point of sale,Marcos said.

Any information in the SIM card registration shall be treated as absolutely confidential unless access to this information has been granted by the written consent of the subscriber,he added.

The President likewise said that PTEs can only disclose the information contained in the SIM card, upon a duly issued subpoena or order of a court upon a finding of probable cause.

They can also be compelled to do so upon written request from a law enforcement agency concerning an ongoing investigation, that a particular number is used in the commission of a crime or that it was used as a means to commit an unlawful act

Appropriate penalties shall be imposed for any breach of confidentiality due to negligence, for spoofing a registered SIM card, for the selling of stolen SIM cards, and for the sale or transfer of a registered SIM without complying with required registration.

https://mb.com.ph/2022/10/10/marcos-signs-sim-registration-act/

 

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agree..  It's going to take some time before the telco's are ready.. Main reason I posted is because It's Coming..  and it will affect those who live here. As for your questions..  I could add mo

I will just pass on personal experience when this happened in Saudi Arabia. At one time, you could get a SIM card from just about anywhere, then they passed the same kind of law as you are seeing now

Well if I read the info correctly, we have a long grace period of 180 days until next April to register, so nobody needs to get their knickers in a twist just yet.

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to_dave007

Bongbong Marcos signs SIM Card Registration Act

MANILA, Philippines — President Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. on Monday signed the SIM Card Registration Act, the first law he signed as the country’s chief executive.

The SIM Card Registration Act, Republic Act No. 11934, highlights the following:

  • Before selling SIM cards, telco companies and direct sellers are required to ask for a valid identification document.
  • Registering a SIM card with false or fictitious information, using fictitious identities, or carrying out fraudulent activities will be subject to appropriate penalties.
  • In case of a subpoena or court order, telcos must give out SIM card owners’ full names and addresses.
  • People with SIM cards already need to register with telcos within a certain time frame. SIM cards will be deactivated if you don’t.
  • Subscriber SIM cards must be kept on file by telecommunications companies. A list of authorized dealers and agents nationwide must be submitted quarterly to the National Telecommunications Commission by companies.
  • Telcos may be asked by law enforcement agencies to look up the owner of a SIM card when they investigate crimes committed through phones.
  • A signing ceremony was held at the Ceremonial Hall in Malacañang and was attended by several lawmakers led by House Speaker and Leyte Rep. Martin Romualdez.

According to Office of the Press Secretary officer-in-charge Cheloy Garafil, the SIM Card Registration Act aims to provide “accountability in the use of SIM cards and aid law enforcers to track perpetrators of crimes committed through phones.”

The signing of the measure will likewise “significantly boost government initiatives against scams committed through text and online messages, which have become more prevalent this year.”

The SIM Registration Act and the bill postponing the barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) polls are the first two enrolled bills of the 19th Congress.

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1677723/fwd-marcos-jr-signs-into-law-sim-card-registration-act?utm_source=gallery&utm_medium=direct

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battleborn

It is signed into law but when does it take effect? To register does every sim card vendor have a government form you will need to fill out or just their personal notebook.

Are you asked every time you buy a load?  Do you have to carry a receipt for proof that your registered.   Sounds a bit confusing to me and what stops a person that wants to commit a scam from getting a false ID to purchase the sim card?  Too many questions

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to_dave007
8 minutes ago, battleborn said:

It is signed into law but when does it take effect?

agree..  It's going to take some time before the telco's are ready.. Main reason I posted is because It's Coming..  and it will affect those who live here.

As for your questions..  I could add more..   But what's the point..  None of us have the answers yet. 

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battleborn

I am glad you posted it.  Just shows how some laws in the Philippines are not well thought out.  I do think finding a sim card to buy in the future will be harder to come by.

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I believe there are over 150 countries that have mandatory sim registration. Not a new concept. The process as described in the law is not onerous. 

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I will just pass on personal experience when this happened in Saudi Arabia. At one time, you could get a SIM card from just about anywhere, then they passed the same kind of law as you are seeing now in the Philippines. If the SIM card is not linked to some sort of ID, it won't work. When getting load, you had to text the ID number on file with the rest of the info, or it would not recharge. Our ID number was our national ID number, or IQAMA for foreigners. After time, they even required  our fingerprint be on file. The system did work as long as you didn't try to circumvent it, and there was a 6 month or 1 year switchover period, can't remember exactly. If, after the grace period, if you hadn't switched over, your SIM just didn't work anymore.

I would think the actual buying of SIMs from any place other than an actual provider will dry up as it did in Saudi, too much paperwork, and if it isn't registered, won't work, so people will quit selling them. Should still be able to reload if registered, though.

 

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battleborn

I did a little reading online about sim card registration and it varies from country to country.  Some of the potential reasons for registration could make some people uncomfortable.  I am certain we will hear more it in the near future.

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Chris24

Not sure that this will help much, considering that the vast majority of scam calls come from call centers using virtual numbers and not sim cards.  I wonder how that will affect travelers' ability to buy a local sim at the airport for use while they are here.  Maybe we still can but have to spend time registering at the kiosk with passport?  Or go to a carrier store.  Sari Sari and 7-11 probably won't want to deal with registration or be equipped to do so.

Incidentally I tried using a local sim in my older iphone this trip, and found it to be just too much of a hassle vs. just using my US phone.  My US carrier offers unlimited data and texts when traveling internationally (for some countries including the Philippines) , and the phone picks up whatever tower is available without regard to carrier, so I have signal most of the time.  But the one with the Philippine sim seems not to be able to text or call with just wifi once my initial load was used up, and only gets Globe signal.  I though it'd be useful to use a local number for taxi drivers, hotels etc. but it has not been the case, probably it would have worked if I had kept load it.

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Wondering how this will work for sims on plans. The sim number is not even registered in the phone. Providers like Globe have all your details that they asked for when they sell you that plan. They control the sim until the plan is closed.

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to_dave007

Roaming mobile users included in SIM registration law: DICT

MANILA – SIM cards from the country’s three telecommunications companies (telcos), including roaming SIM cards used overseas, will be required to register as part of the recently approved SIM card registration law, an official of the Department of Information and Communications Technology (DICT) said Wednesday.

In a press briefing in Malacañang, DICT Secretary Ivan John Uy said SIM cards connected to Globe Telecom Inc., Smart Communications Inc., and DITO Telecommunity are included and will be notified of the necessary steps once the registration process begins.

“If they are out of the country, they will receive a text message from the telcos themselves, ‘please go to this site or open the app,’” Uy said.

Most of the country’s telcos, he said, have existing mobile applications they can use to sign in and verify their identity.

However, he said some are currently limited to asking for a user’s name and date of birth and will be later expanded to include other personal details as part of the SIM registration law.

“Kukunan mo ng picture iyong ID mo o passport or LTO (Land Transportation Office) license or whatever government-issued ID and then i-upload doon (You’ll have to take a photo of your ID, passport, LTO license, or whatever government-issued ID and have it uploaded),” he said.

The telcos, he said, will verify these submitted IDs to complete the registration.

On Monday, President Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. signed Republic Act No. 11934, also known as An Act Requiring the Registration of SIM Cards in a ceremony in Malacañan Palace.

 

https://www.pna.gov.ph/articles/1185982

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DeedleNuts

If it becomes too much of a hassle I'll just switch to a foreign carrier that offers cheap rates here. I never call anyone anyway, it's all Skype/Whatsapp/Viber. The places that want my cell# can have my US number.

Nice way to reduce PH telco revenue though, brilliant. 

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  • 2 months later...
liquido

December 27 is approaching fast...Heard a rumor saying SRRV holders are not required to register...sounds to good to be true..

https://whatalife.ph/how-to-register-sim-card-in-the-philippines/#h-sim-card-registration-for-foreign-nationals-and-tourists

Quote

 

SIM Card Registration for Foreign Nationals and Tourists

Foreign nationals staying as tourists for less than 30 days must register their name, nationality, passport number, and address in the Philippines.

Tourists must present their passport, proof of address in the Philippines, as well as return ticket to their own country or any other ticket, which shows the date and time of their departure from the Philippines.

For foreign nationals with other types of visas and staying for more than 30 days, they are required to present the following:

passport

proof of address in the Philippines,

Alien Employment Permit issued by the Department of Labor and Employment,

Alien Certificate of Registration ID,

school registration ID for students; or other pertinent documents.

Their registered SIMs are only valid for 30 days and shall be automatically deactivated upon expiration of validity.

 

 

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HappyinPH
5 hours ago, liquido said:

December 27 is approaching fast...Heard a rumor saying SRRV holders are not required to register...sounds to good to be true..

https://whatalife.ph/how-to-register-sim-card-in-the-philippines/#h-sim-card-registration-for-foreign-nationals-and-tourists

Well if I read the info correctly, we have a long grace period of 180 days until next April to register, so nobody needs to get their knickers in a twist just yet.

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to_dave007

Update on this....

The actual text of the Sim Card Registration Act is here:    Sim card Registration act.pdf

There are specific requirements for Foreign Nationals which you can see in Section 5(e).  Requirements for TOURISTS (on 9A Visa) and OTHER VISA TYPES are specified.

As I see it the WORST and MOST DIFFICULT aspects of this law are:

  1. ANY SIM REGISTERED TO A TOURIST 9A VISA HOLDER IS VALID FOR 30 DAYS ONLY AND THEN WILL BE DEACTIVATED AUTOMATICALLY. 
  2. 9A Tourists must provided proof of address
  3. 9A Tourists must provide proof of exit ticket

This VLOG starts off weak but in second half has pretty good stuff for 9A tourists. 

Does not look TOO bad for other visa types (SRRV or 13A) but for anyone here on tourist visa (like me) it could pose a big problem.

I know one Swiss National (married 13A) who has already completed the registration.  He had trouble on first attempt (web site issue) but second attempt apparently succeeded.  I will ask him for more details. 

 

 

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