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Salty Dog
9 hours ago, SkyMan said:

Salty? You still there? Evac?

I'm fine, but not sure about those along the Gulf Coast where it came ashore.

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Ozepete
On 9/29/2022 at 11:34 PM, Salty Dog said:

I'm fine, but not sure about those along the Gulf Coast where it came ashore.

Hoping you and your family are still ok mate. Seems to be a lot of damage and injury according to reports from here. 

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Jester

Being in Ft Meyers, well I wasn't really in Ft Myers, that is where our house is.  We hoped in our little RV and got outta town, spent the storm in Gainesville FL.  They turned the electric on after 3 days we expected a couple weeks!   Our house is virtually undamaged, we were very luck as there is lot's of destruction around us.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7Fu-v490-c

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I don't mind no electric, water, internet, but when the sewage wouldn't flow without electricity we had enough and left home yesterday. We are being told electric service will be restored by October 9th. My town of Englewood is in real bad shape. And the people are really beginning to smell without a shower. Lol. But it's great to see people come together and help one another as we always do in a natural disaster. 

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mikecon3

The electric companies actually seem to have their act together when it comes to storms. We were traveling I10 east from New Orleans back to NC a couple of days before the storm, and passed MANY utility trucks and crews from Texas heading that way to stage before it hit.

One of many, but saw that Samaritan's Purse was sending teams down to Florida. They helped my relatives a lot during Florence. They "remediate", which means they come in and pull out the wet stuff, cut out the dry wall that is wet, pull up any flooring that is wet...all at no cost to you. If you need their assistance, make sure you get signed up, I'm sure they'll be busy.

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Jester
4 hours ago, Edwin said:

I don't mind no electric, water, internet, but when the sewage wouldn't flow without electricity we had enough and left home yesterday. We are being told electric service will be restored by October 9th. My town of Englewood is in real bad shape. And the people are really beginning to smell without a shower. Lol. But it's great to see people come together and help one another as we always do in a natural disaster. 

Those F idiots,  electric sewer and screen doors on submarines.  Maybe set up an out house over the septic tank? 

 

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Jester
58 minutes ago, mikecon3 said:

The electric companies actually seem to have their act together when it comes to storms. We were traveling I10 east from New Orleans back to NC a couple of days before the storm, and passed MANY utility trucks and crews from Texas heading that way to stage before it hit.

One of many, but saw that Samaritan's Purse was sending teams down to Florida. They helped my relatives a lot during Florence. They "remediate", which means they come in and pull out the wet stuff, cut out the dry wall that is wet, pull up any flooring that is wet...all at no cost to you. If you need their assistance, make sure you get signed up, I'm sure they'll be busy.

On the way north before the storm there were fleets of trucks heading south on the interstate, not a 100, we saw hundreds of them.  License plates from all over. 

 

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Jester

They forced electric sewers down peoples throats,  what will the imbeciles come up with next, electric car's.  Naw even they are not that stupid. 

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to_dave007
5 hours ago, Jester said:

On the way north before the storm there were fleets of trucks heading south on the interstate, not a 100, we saw hundreds of them.  License plates from all over. 

My brother is 30+ year electric utility worker in southern Ontario Canada and his company will no doubt have sent trucks from Ontario Canada.  And pretty much all utility companies in between will be there.  It's common practice in power industry in North America that ALL the utility companies pitch in to help in emergecy like this.  They get paid for it..  and the workers who go.. all volunteers ussually..  make pretty good overtime..  I believe there are actually written agreements in place to cover this.  Makes sense if you think abouit it..  as NONE of the companies by themselves could resource the task of clean up after this kind of event.

I read an article once about utility company response to Katrina which contrasted the utility response to the FEMA response.  Much more than 10,000 extra utility workers joined the utility companies in Lousiana and Mississippi for about a week after the event.. with all their equipment.  And many were in place, with the equipment they needed.  just hours after the winds stopped... and while FEMA was still in bed. The ability to respond quickly is quite a source of pride within that industry.  Many of the trucks were  fully loaded, staffed, and ON THE ROAD (!!!) before Katrina even made landfall.  They did not wait for full damage assessment.

It happens even here in Philippines.  Couple weeks after Odette last December I was In Lahug headed up TransCentral past Marco Polo Hotel and there was a large utility crew working to repair damage there.. I'd say about 6 vehicles.. 40+ men.. And from the logo's on the vehcles.. Looked like they were from Pampanga.  I saw them again some days later..  further up the mountain..  I think they stayed for at least a month.

The following extract is from Mississippi Power web site.... (https://www.mississippipower.com/community/community-outreach/disaster-recovery---hurricane-katrina.html)

1,200 became 12,000 and restored power in 12 days

As first responders began to clear roads, Mississippi Power employees began to assess the catastrophic damage. Most Mississippi Power employees had damage to their homes. Almost 100 lost their homes entirely. But as soon as the winds subsided and with support from Southern Company Family Services, they put their own needs to the side and reported for duty. Employees had one goal in mind: get the power back on for their customers.

The call for assistance went out to other utilities and the nation responded. Mississippi Power's 1,200-person force quickly became an army of 12,000. Mississippi Power CEO Anthony Topazi set an aggressive goal and led the Storm Team to restore power in 12 days to all customers who could receive it. The Edison Electric Institute later honored Mississippi Power for its rapid Hurricane Katrina restoration with its prestigious Emergency Response Award.

How we did it:

  • Utility workers and equipment came from all over the country and Canada. Each Mississippi Power employee was empowered to make decisions on the spot using their expertise and experience to restore power as safely and quickly as possible.
  • The care and feeding of 12,000 workers was in itself an enormous task. It took 250,000 meals. Employees checked in and had laundries wash 93,000 pounds of clothing. People ate, washed up and slept in tent cities or wherever they could.
  • The operation required up to 140,000 gallons of fuel daily and coordination with government and law enforcement officials to ensure its safe delivery.
  • With all landlines and most cellular service destroyed, SouthernLINC Wireless radios, used by Mississippi Power employees, were the only means of communication.
  • Surrounded by utter destruction, safety procedures were more important than ever. Despite the adverse conditions, only three minor injuries were reported.

This is also an interesting engineering article about Katrina response in Mississippi that gives some insight into how it's done in utility industry. (https://www.nae.edu/7621/RebuildingElectricalInfrastructurealongtheGulfCoastACaseStudy)

Just a small extract,...

"Three days prior to landfall, Mississippi Power, assuming a direct hit from a major hurricane, began making requests for manpower, material, and logistics‚ÄĒincluding almost 3,000 linemen (NOTE: Would grow to 10,000+ in the days after this) and 1,750 tree trimmers. However, damage in Florida and the risk posed to utilities along the northern Gulf of Mexico in the projected path of Katrina‚Äôs second landfall reduced the regional pool of qualified line workers. Mississippi Power also placed orders for additional transformers, poles, conductor, line hardware, and fuel over and above its normal storm-season stocking levels.

Arrangements were made for nearly 4,800 beds variously located in mobile sleeper trailers, military facilities, college facilities, tents, cots in company facilities, and motels as far away as Pensacola, Montgomery, and Dothan. A pre-arranged plan with a logistics vendor, which included provisions for tents, caterers, portable toilets, showers, and dumpsters to be set up at predetermined staging sites, was implemented on Friday, August 26, three days before the storm hit. By the time Katrina made landfall, the company had spent $7 million in securing equipment and logistical support."

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Jester
1 hour ago, to_dave007 said:

My brother is 30+ year electric utility worker in southern Ontario Canada and his company will no doubt have sent trucks from Ontario Canada.  And pretty much all utility companies in between will be there.  It's common practice in power industry in North America that ALL the utility companies pitch in to help in emergecy like this.  They get paid for it..  and the workers who go.. all volunteers ussually..  make pretty good overtime..  I believe there are actually written agreements in place to cover this.  Makes sense if you think abouit it..  as NONE of the companies by themselves could resource the task of clean up after this kind of event.

I read an article once about utility company response to Katrina which contrasted the utility response to the FEMA response.  Much more than 10,000 extra utility workers joined the utility companies in Lousiana and Mississippi for about a week after the event.. with all their equipment.  And many were in place, with the equipment they needed.  just hours after the winds stopped... and while FEMA was still in bed. The ability to respond quickly is quite a source of pride within that industry.  Many of the trucks were  fully loaded, staffed, and ON THE ROAD (!!!) before Katrina even made landfall.  They did not wait for full damage assessment.

It happens even here in Philippines.  Couple weeks after Odette last December I was In Lahug headed up TransCentral past Marco Polo Hotel and there was a large utility crew working to repair damage there.. I'd say about 6 vehicles.. 40+ men.. And from the logo's on the vehcles.. Looked like they were from Pampanga.  I saw them again some days later..  further up the mountain..  I think they stayed for at least a month.

The following extract is from Mississippi Power web site.... (https://www.mississippipower.com/community/community-outreach/disaster-recovery---hurricane-katrina.html)

1,200 became 12,000 and restored power in 12 days

As first responders began to clear roads, Mississippi Power employees began to assess the catastrophic damage. Most Mississippi Power employees had damage to their homes. Almost 100 lost their homes entirely. But as soon as the winds subsided and with support from Southern Company Family Services, they put their own needs to the side and reported for duty. Employees had one goal in mind: get the power back on for their customers.

The call for assistance went out to other utilities and the nation responded. Mississippi Power's 1,200-person force quickly became an army of 12,000. Mississippi Power CEO Anthony Topazi set an aggressive goal and led the Storm Team to restore power in 12 days to all customers who could receive it. The Edison Electric Institute later honored Mississippi Power for its rapid Hurricane Katrina restoration with its prestigious Emergency Response Award.

How we did it:

  • Utility workers and equipment came from all over the country and Canada. Each Mississippi Power employee was empowered to make decisions on the spot using their expertise and experience to restore power as safely and quickly as possible.
  • The care and feeding of 12,000 workers was in itself an enormous task. It took 250,000 meals. Employees checked in and had laundries wash 93,000 pounds of clothing. People ate, washed up and slept in tent cities or wherever they could.
  • The operation required up to 140,000 gallons of fuel daily and coordination with government and law enforcement officials to ensure its safe delivery.
  • With all landlines and most cellular service destroyed, SouthernLINC Wireless radios, used by Mississippi Power employees, were the only means of communication.
  • Surrounded by utter destruction, safety procedures were more important than ever. Despite the adverse conditions, only three minor injuries were reported.

This is also an interesting engineering article about Katrina response in Mississippi that gives some insight into how it's done in utility industry. (https://www.nae.edu/7621/RebuildingElectricalInfrastructurealongtheGulfCoastACaseStudy)

Just a small extract,...

"Three days prior to landfall, Mississippi Power, assuming a direct hit from a major hurricane, began making requests for manpower, material, and logistics‚ÄĒincluding almost 3,000 linemen (NOTE: Would grow to 10,000+ in the days after this) and 1,750 tree trimmers. However, damage in Florida and the risk posed to utilities along the northern Gulf of Mexico in the projected path of Katrina‚Äôs second landfall reduced the regional pool of qualified line workers. Mississippi Power also placed orders for additional transformers, poles, conductor, line hardware, and fuel over and above its normal storm-season stocking levels.

Arrangements were made for nearly 4,800 beds variously located in mobile sleeper trailers, military facilities, college facilities, tents, cots in company facilities, and motels as far away as Pensacola, Montgomery, and Dothan. A pre-arranged plan with a logistics vendor, which included provisions for tents, caterers, portable toilets, showers, and dumpsters to be set up at predetermined staging sites, was implemented on Friday, August 26, three days before the storm hit. By the time Katrina made landfall, the company had spent $7 million in securing equipment and logistical support."

In my quest to escape Ian in our little Roadtrek,  class B van made in Cananada we found that ALL state parks with RV sites were closed and I think maybe 2 out of hundreds of private RV parks were closed.  

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1 hour ago, Jester said:

In my quest to escape Ian in our little Roadtrek,  class B van

Nice ride, my mothers neighbor had one and loved it 

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Headshot
14 hours ago, Jester said:

They forced electric sewers down peoples throats,  what will the imbeciles come up with next, electric car's.  Naw even they are not that stupid. 

‚ÄúOne of the things that history teaches us is that we should never underestimate human stupidity.‚ÄĚ

                                                                                                        Yuval Harari - Historian

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We're back home and all services are restored. Schools start up again Oct 18. We have contractors here today tearing out the walls that got wet, running fans and dehumidifiers. The roof needs some tiles replaced and we still need trees removed but it's good to be back home. 

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15 hours ago, Edwin said:

We're back home and all services are restored. Schools start up again Oct 18. We have contractors here today tearing out the walls that got wet, running fans and dehumidifiers. The roof needs some tiles replaced and we still need trees removed but it's good to be back home. 

You are lucky to get contractors in so quick!  Neighbor lost pool enclosure,  insurance adjuster came.  He is trying to get estimate to replace and can't even find someone that will give him an estimate.  I am getting calls everyday from scammers pretending to be contractors.

 

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