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BossHog

With the ongoing lockout/strike thing looking ominous Spring Training is on hold and regular season looks like a delayed start. But...but....

...MiLB is going ahead. I've adopted a minor league team and will be following the Altoona Curve. If you've ever taken Amtrak's Broadway Limited from Chicago to New York you'll know how the team got its name.

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Edwin

I finally get my chance and land a contract with a major league baseball team and we're locked out. But like any good player I'll be staying in shape and honing my craft while negotiations carry on. We had voluntary workouts at the spring training facility two days last week. I'm versatile and capable at almost any position. I'm not expected to make it past spring training but at my age that's okay. At least I made it this far. Let's get the season started. 

"Hi! Welcome to the ball park. May I show you to your seats?" 

For 13 games I'll be a "Fan Host" for the Rays.

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  • 3 weeks later...
BossHog
Posted (edited)

Lockout's over! Opening Day now scheduled for April 7th, only a week late. Play Ball!

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" Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association reached a tentative agreement Thursday on a new collective bargaining agreement, according to ESPN's Jeff Passan. The union voted to approve a new proposal by a 26-12 margin (a simple majority, or 20 votes, was all that was required for the new agreement to pass), and now the owner-imposed lockout will be lifted and the offseason will reopen. MLB teams are set to play a full, 162-game season in 2022 and Opening Day is April 7, per Bowden.

Players will have to report for spring training over the coming days."

 

Edited by BossHog
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BossHog
Posted (edited)

The good, the bad, and the whatever. My highly subjective opinion of the new rules coming to MLB:

1. Superb. No more runners on second to start off the tenth inning. This was an atrocity better suited to girls' softball or a six-year old T-ball league.

2. Fantastic: They're doing away with seven-inning doubleheader games. Full eighteen-inning afternoons (and evenings) are the fans' highlight of many a weekend

3. Nice idea. The 2023 schedule will be more balanced as teams will play at least one series against every opponent in both leagues. You wanna make sure your team and its fans have an up-close look at whatever rising superstar is on the way up.

4.. Seems legit. More offense and fewer collisions. Bigger bases kinda make sense and worked out well in the minor league Triple A trial so why not. 15" increased to 18" square.

5. Undecided. Valid arguments to be made on both sides of banning the defensive shift.

6. Ambivalent. Playoffs will be expanded to 12 teams instead of 10. Obvious money grab from owners for more revenue but might help perennially shit teams (like mine) sneak in. The owners actually wanted 14 teams which is absurd and you'd end up like the NHL with the regular season barely counting anymore. 

7.. Ugh. Advertising on uniforms and helmets. Don't we already consume enough advertising during a single game in multiple forms? Enough already! 

8. Retarded. Pitch clocks have no place in baseball. In clutch situations you obviously need more time to pitch select or keep a base runner from stealing. 

9. Capital offense-worthy rule change: the universal DH. Don't even get me started; I'll turn apoplectic enough to stroke out.

Edited by BossHog
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battleborn

Die hard Angels fan and ready for my expectations to be shattered.  Glad its a full season

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rfm010

Fwiw, george will:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/03/16/problems-for-major-league-baseball-bigger-than-lockout/

Opinion: The lockout was the least of baseball’s problems

Throughout the negotiations of a new collective bargaining agreement between the players and team owners, Major League Baseball resembled someone who, diagnosed with cancer, says: “I want to fight this — but, first, I want a knee replacement.” Misplaced priorities. Baseball’s problems are fascinating because they are the result of everyone acting reasonably on the basis of abundant, accurate information.

The players union did what unions are supposed to do: It fought over the distribution of the industry’s revenue. Young players, who are more numerous and productive than ever, lack bargaining leverage (e.g., free agency). So, the union succeeded in tilting the compensation system toward the young (e.g., higher minimum salaries). Now comes the cancer treatment.

Games become ever-longer but with fewer balls in play — more than a third of all at-bats result in strikeouts, walks or home runs, which are four seconds of a flying ball followed by the batter’s jog. Longer games with less action is an atrocious recipe for an entertainment business.

Players spend much more time with leather on their hands than with wood in their hands, but today’s players’ dazzling athleticism is too infrequently displayed because “analytics” — a.k.a. data; baseball participates in the national plague of linguistic inflation — make too many players’ “tendencies” predictable.

Baseball has been overwhelmed by pitchers’ velocity: They throw secondary pitches (not fastballs) 93 mph. Because they expend maximum effort on so many pitches, they take extra recovery time between pitches, and the game congeals. A pitch clock (say, 14 seconds with no runners on base, 19with runners on) would force pitchers to work faster, relying more on less-strenuous pitches.

Some fans will remember when matchups of great starting pitchers — Sandy Koufax against Juan Marichal, Bob Gibson against Tom Seaver — were riveting spectacles. If a pitch clock causes pitchers to economize their energy, we can recapture the magic of two great ones going deep into games.

The clock would address baseball’s most infuriating dead time — hitters wandering away from home plate during an at-bat, as though puzzling about Fermat’s Last Theorem. If the batter is not in the batter’s box when the pitch is delivered, it would be called a strike. Pitchers might resent having to pick up the pace, but they will benefit from batters not having time to ponder the next pitch. And if two infielders have to be on either side of second base, all four with their spikes on the infield dirt as the pitch is delivered, there will be a premium placed on fielders with range, rather than on more one-dimensional players whose defensive shortcomings can be disguised by a 23-year-old math major who positions the defense where each batter’s proclivities require, given the pitcher’s “spin rate,” the batter’s “launch angle,” etc.

In 2021, there were 1,070 fewer stolen bases than 10 years earlier. Bigger bases (18 square inches rather than 15) would shorten the sprint between bases, increasing the likelihood of action. Think how often instant replays show an attempted stolen base coming up two inches short. If the MLB’s attendance is going to get back to its peak of 80 million fans in 2007, it must restore the energy of the game as it was when arguably the greatest game was played.

Game 7 of the 1960 World Series — Pirates 10, Yankees 9, won by Bill Mazeroski’s walk-off home run — was played in 2 hours and 36 minutes, during which there were no strikeouts. In last year’s Series, the shortest game — Astros 7, Braves 2 — was 3 hours and 11 minutes, and there were 23 strikeouts, 45 percent of all the outs.

Now MLB must tweak its rules or find a slew of Rod Carews. He wielded a bat with the delicacy of an orchestral conductor’s baton. The first time Tony La Russa managed against Carew, he moved his shortstop up the middle. So, Carew singled through the spot that La Russa’s shortstop had vacated. In Carew’s next at-bat, La Russa, chastened, left the shortstop where he normally played. So, Carew — don’t tug on Superman’s cape — singled through the spot where La Russa had placed the shortstop in Carew’s first at-bat . Carew’s third at-bat: a bunt so perfect he reached base without a throw.

Today’s analytics could not have helped opponents cope with Carew. He, however, was a genius. Better to change baseball’s rules than to count on reviving the game with an abundance of genius, which is always scarce.

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  • 3 weeks later...
BossHog
Posted (edited)

See, this is what happens when you try and save a few bucks and order MLB jerseys from Mainland China. Let's Go Piratas!

But hey, at least they arrived on time for Opening Day.

edit: While a factory error, the missus now informs me that piratas means Pirates in Filipino (and Spanish). So that's kinda cool.

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Edited by BossHog
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BossHog
Posted (edited)

Ouch. Pirates 0 Chicago Cubs 21. Our worst loss in the team's 131-year history.

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And I got up at 2 AM on a Sunday morning to watch this shit-show? 

Edited by BossHog
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BossHog
On 3/16/2022 at 9:14 PM, rfm010 said:

Game 7 of the 1960 World Series — Pirates 10, Yankees 9, won by Bill Mazeroski’s walk-off home run — was played in 2 hours and 36 minutes

I still watch that game once a year on its anniversary. Even if it was played nine years before I was born.

Interesting fun fact: Bing Crosby was part owner of the Pirates and a nervous wreck but didn't want to "jinx" the team and jetted off to Paris instead of watching live.

Everyone thought the footage of that epic game had been lost to history but in 2010 they found the film reels in Bing's wine cellar.

 

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Edwin

The Rays played a wild one last night. After pitching a no hitter for nine innings the the Rays let the Red Sox take a 2-0 lead in the 10th. Who pitches a no hitter and loses? Kevin Kiermaier had enough of that crap and hit a three run walk off Homer for the Rays win.

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rfm010
On 4/24/2022 at 7:35 AM, BossHog said:

Ouch. Pirates 0 Chicago Cubs 21. Our worst loss in the team's 131-year history.

To the cubs.  Gotta hurt.  Cant blame pirate pitching though if the offense wont give any support.

Been thinking about these rule changes.  Maybe they should introduce relegation like they have in soccer.  Worst team in the league goes to the minors.

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BossHog
31 minutes ago, rfm010 said:

To the cubs.  Gotta hurt. 

Funny thing is the Pirates won 3 of the 4 game series at Wrigley but with a cumulative negative 16 run differential. Some statistician calculated that's a first in MLB history.

I'm good with an 8-8 record. Could be worse. Could be a Reds fan.

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