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So what was so bad about martial law?


softail

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softail

Today, September 21, marks 49 years after former President and dictator Ferdinand Marcos signed Proclamation 1081, effectively declaring martial law in the Philippines. This began a period of authoritarian rule, marked by the death of press freedom, widespread human rights violations, and plunder.

Despite these transgressions being widely recorded, myths about Martial Law continue to perpetuate, tarnishing the memory of those who have suffered under the period, and distorting the truths about how the country has suffered during this dark regime.

Read: The internet is fuming at Toni Gonzaga’s interview with Bongbong Marcos

Here, a quick reminder of how bad martial law was during the time.

Under martial law, 70,000 were detained, 34,000 were tortured, and 3,240 were killed by the military and police.

These figures from Amnesty International show that the regime was rife with human rights violations: including 70,000 incarcerations (many of them warrantless due to the writ of habeas corpus being suspended); 34,000 documented tortures; over 3,200 extrajudicial killings; and 77 disappearances.

The UP Institute of Human Rights posted a compilation of quotes from Supreme Court cases related to martial law and the Marcos dictatorship that dealt with many of these violations.

6 out of 10 Filipinos were poor during martial law.

Contrary to revisionists’ claim that the Philippines was in its “golden age” during the time, poverty became more widespread under Marcos. When Marcos took office, 4 out of 10 Filipinos were poor; this number rose to 6 out 10 by the end of his rule, according to the Martial Law Museum.

The country’s debt rose to $28.86 billion.

Again debunking the myth that the country was in its golden economic years under Marcos, the country’s international debt rose from $0.36 billion in 1961 to $28.26 billion in 1986 — a massive burden that Filipinos continue to pay for to this day.

464 media outlets were closed after martial law was declared.

On September 22, 1972, Marcos ordered the military to take over the assets of major media outlets. Six days later, Marcos ordered the Department of National Defense to sequester the facilities of ABS-CBN and ABC.

A total of 464 media outlets were closed after the declaration of martial law, according to the Inquirer archives, including church publications.

We hope this has refreshed your memory. Today is a good day to pick up a book, hear the stories of the victims during this time, and say #NeverAgain.

In case you’re looking for a must-read to enlighten yourself on the truths of the Marcos regime, here is a link to a free and full copy of The Conjugal Dictatorship by Primitivo Mijares.

Sociologist Ash Presto (@sosyolohija on Twitter) also tweeted an extensive compilation of other references to check out for your martial law education.

https://ph.yahoo.com/news/bad-martial-law-025649704.html

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hyaku

Bongbong said in another interview, "I am not my father". Thing is are people stupid enough to take the risk?. What sort of a crazy system is it anyway when his mother can still hold a position? 

We are already in a state of soft martial law with covid. 

 

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BossHog
4 hours ago, softail said:

Today is a good day to pick up a book

Essential reads:

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MickyG

bong bong marcos was 28 years old dressed in combat gear ready to do his fathers bidding, prior to American air power flying a very low very loud warning to marcos if he did unleash his dogs of war on the crowds in EDSA. Not like father not like son. the jury may still be out, just not sure why!

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I'm a "martial law baby." So many bad memories. The stupid songs and pledges. The warning from parents to never utter a word about their politics, and to lie if asked. My parents explaining what a suspension of the writ of habeas corpus means. Looking up the meaning of the word martial in my father's thick Merriam-Webster dictionary, the one with onion-skin paper so thin it was almost translucent yet the print never showed through. What illegal assembly meant at that time -- a public gathering of 3 or more people which I took way too seriously. Do you know how crazy it is for kids to be counting the number of people around at all times? 123, 123, 123.. even when children are playing? Too many deaths and disapperances. So much corruption and plunder. So much abuse of power.

I'm talking about Marcos, not Duterte, though you can re-read and come to the same conclusion.

Martial law lasted almost 20 years, causing generational damage that's near-impossible to repair when majority of younger Filipinos would rather read fake news on social media than study history. 

You would think that forced suffering during this pandemic would have convinced many that elections have consequences, yet they continue to celebrity-worship, or just be plain ignorant. Just look at the presidential candidates hogging the headlines. What a cruel joke on this country. That's what generational damage looks like. That's how bad martial law was, that even today we are still confronting the ghosts (some are still very much alive) from that era.

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cookie47

My first trip to the Philippines (From Australia) was in mid 1983. (I was 35).

Manila only. However As it was my first trip I had nothing to compare regarding Martial law...We were a group trip and were shown the typical,? Manila sites. Intramuros,Bamboo Organ, which next door had a company building Jeeps....A building that houses MacArthur's Personal vehicle.A very large park.?.with a Japanese Garden..A few restaurants and night spot's.,🤩 .I didn't notice anything that could alert me that Martial law was in existence.We moved About freely without any visuals.Although the doorman of the hotel did give us a heads up on where NOT to go AT NIGHT ... Also as a mechanic and government vehicle inspector at the Time I was blown away with blue and green lights on the REAR of Vehicles, and so many drivers that turned their lights OFF completely, when waiting at traffic lights.,🥴.

Of coarse  local people probably had a completely different experience which I acknowledge and appreciate.

Having married in 84 I can remember a couple of years later watching the EDSA gatherings on TV...BTW September 21 is my Birthday ....

 

 

 

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Hey, belated happy birthday!

Martial law was officially lifted in 1981 though the rotten dictatorship remained. If you came in 1983, that was the year Ninoy Aquino was assassinated, one of the sparks that led to Marcos's ousting. 

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cookie47
7 minutes ago, KMonde said:

If you came in 1983, that was the year Ninoy Aquino was assassinated, one

Yes correct , Although my trip was "About April" so I guess some level of Martial law was still in existence ?

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All this talk about martial law is bringing back memories, like the fear of the notorious MetroCom that spied on and abducted students from our school, which was considered a hotbed of activism. We all learned to stay away from unmarked white vans with swing doors and tinted windows. 

MetroCom agents were all over campus. Easy to spot. Military haircuts. Older. They'd take classes, usually political science, to meet student leaders. Used fake names, which was easily cross-checked with the registrar's office. Can't memorize student numbers, a dead giveaway in this school where that's the equivalent of not knowing the secret handshake. Agents would live on campus as roommates. Students knew who they were and played along, sending them on wild chases, e.g., telling them there's a rally at a specific location and they'd show up there by their lonesome.

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cookie47
11 minutes ago, KMonde said:

martial law i

One thing of note in 84 when I met my first wife I attempted to buy a short wave radio hopefully receiving radio AUSTRALIA for some news.(No tv ,or  Radio of interest In Escalante Negros at the time..Plus no power or running water.....

My then BIL said nope,,,, a banned item in the Marcos years apparently which turned out to be true having walked the length of Colon st....

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BossHog
On 9/24/2021 at 1:38 PM, cookie47 said:

I attempted to buy a short wave radio hopefully receiving radio AUSTRALIA for some news

I remember those days. No Tv. No Internet. No phones.

All the local ex-pats would gather every morning to hear the news and sports scores on a Grundig Yacht Boy short wave radio.

We'd sling a long wire up in a coconut tree as an antenna to improve the signal.

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cookie47
39 minutes ago, BossHog said:

Grundig Yacht Boy

Wow. nice radio.I had a Tecsun 380 SSB in Australia  but my Mrs dropped avcup and soaked it in milk…🤨… Only this week I have investigated reactivating my Aussie Ham License.  No license testing here currently due to covide otherwise I'd sit the local exam. Then. I'll. Need a radio… MONEY…….. Haa. 

It was good days in the backblocks of Negros. Petromax x2 out at 6.0pm.My BIL had a black and white tv…. We put up a 10 element Yagi and on a good day if you held your mouth right you might get a picture from Cebu… 

Eat and All in bed by 8.30..No wonder the birth rate is high😁…… 

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cookie47

As I was thinking  I thought I would  add more  to "What it was like during Marshall  law".
April 1984, Arrived Bacolod Airport to meet what was to be my first wife (died 13 years  later)….. Meeting someone  in a foreign country with half the village  in tow was quite an event. Stayed in hotel , Separate rooms, No touching in those days people…. Bus trip (no windows )next day (5 hours ,one flat tire)… ..
The house backed onto the beach, Water would be under the kitchen on high tide. No electricity, No water, Water arrived daily on a tricicad and the boy filled up jugs in the bathroom and CR.. But the view across the sea were paradise… Breakfast in the piag
An Outside  CR  was for visitors .. a bamboo structure  over the sea..need I explain… .Showering ( well washing) in the dark and on cool morning's was a novelty (had to get up at 4.40 on Sundays for church)  but I was offered a candle to see if i wanted.  The MIL House actually was wired for electricity as so was most houses. I asked why no Power. AHH. 
Someone stole the copper power lines a while back😒… ..As I said in my other post  , No tv although we did put up an antenna in later years , no phones, no internet, Daily visitors to see "The foreigner "… After two weeks I was allowed with to go out alone with my future wife with an epic trip to Cebu. Escalate to Toledo,boat to Tuberan, Bus to Cebu. 13 hours… Leaving the boat for about 5 kilometers we were stopped by what I was to find was a NPA "Patrol".We had to depart the bus (woman on the left ,men on the right… whilst being watched by a guy in Army  looking uniform, Slippers, and what looked like  an M16.

After some financial negotiations with the driver we were allowed to pass. 

Anyways  that some of the happening  during  my early days in PH at nearly the end of Marshal law… 

 

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bmoore
5 minutes ago, cookie47 said:

 

Anyways  that some of the happening  during  my early days in PH at nearly the end of Marshal law… 

 

I remember it much the same. Seriously third world.  Very bad for most of the locals, not so bad for us earning dollars.  

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cookie47
8 minutes ago, bmoore said:

not so bad for us earning dollars.  

Yes you make a good point. 

Being right their and seeing the fishermen go out daily (and have to catch fish)  just to feed the family. Tough life… 

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