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Solar Energy Systems in the Philippines


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RogerDuMond

Anybody have any recent experience with having solar system installed here in the Philippines?

I am thinking of having a hybrid system installed for our place here with net metering and a battery backup system.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

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SkyMan

From what I have seen it doesn't work the way think it should.  It seems no matter how much you produce, you won't get paid. You can reduce your bill and you might get some credits but what good are credits if you're producing more than you need?

 

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RogerDuMond
44 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

From what I have seen it doesn't work the way think it should.  It seems no matter how much you produce, you won't get paid. You can reduce your bill and you might get some credits but what good are credits if you're producing more than you need?

 

Our intention is to produce what we need for our own consumption and avoid brownouts. If we can offset any power we have to draw from CEBECO III during cloudy periods, it will be a positive. There is no cost to getting a net metering meter except for the cost for the electrician to swap out the meters. The power company supplies the new meter at no charge, so unless I am missing something, it makes sense for us to do that.

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A_Simple_Man
1 hour ago, RogerDuMond said:

unless I am missing something

You mentioned you want to feed the grid and avoid brownouts.  These are, in my experience, mutually exclusive.  You either feed the grid and your system goes down when the grid goes down, or you store with batteries and then they consider it too dangerous to feed the grid (your system may send power to the line when it is supposed to be off).  Is there a newer system now?

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RogerDuMond
1 hour ago, A_Simple_Man said:

You mentioned you want to feed the grid and avoid brownouts.  These are, in my experience, mutually exclusive.  You either feed the grid and your system goes down when the grid goes down, or you store with batteries and then they consider it too dangerous to feed the grid (your system may send power to the line when it is supposed to be off).  Is there a newer system now?

Here are two different ways to do it.

Quote

Unlike solar without batteries (i.e. a grid-tied solar system), a solar-plus-battery installation keeps your power on by “islanding,” or disconnecting itself from the grid when an outage is detected. While the blackout remains in effect, your little solar island will charge the batteries during the day and discharge them at night. As long as you have enough battery capacity, you could keep running like this through a very long power outage. 

or

Quote

Luckily, there is a way for a homeowner with solar to use the energy their panels make without a connection to the grid or an energy storage setup. 

SMA and Enphase are two companies that make special solar inverters that are designed to automatically disconnect from the grid in the event of an outage, while still providing power to your home from your solar panels.

https://www.solarreviews.com/blog/solar-can-help-survive-power-outage

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noddle
On 8/17/2021 at 10:21 PM, SkyMan said:

From what I have seen it doesn't work the way think it should.  It seems no matter how much you produce, you won't get paid. You can reduce your bill and you might get some credits but what good are credits if you're producing more than you need?

If you export during the day and get credit,  you use that credit for your power usage at night....   ( depending on what you get per kWh on your export rate )

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Ozepete

Solar here has become the most 'over sold' commodity with very few meeting the promotional bs.  We have contact with many off grid and most are reporting that their expectations are seldom met. Suggest you base the panel's actual production at less than 40% of the marketing claim. 

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cookie47
7 hours ago, Ozepete said:

most are reporting that their expectations are seldom met.

Absolutely,My nephew living in an Outer West Melbourne suburb was a very early adopter of solar. Input credits were good early on but reduced annually to a point close to Zero. (As the saying goes, there's no such thing as a free lunch).

Of course he still has the benefit of solar but no where near the hype that was presented by the electricity company when he installed.. As far as I can tell only one state and the Northern Territory have keped input credits.

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mikewright
On 8/18/2021 at 1:13 PM, RogerDuMond said:

Our intention is to produce what we need for our own consumption and avoid brownouts. If we can offset any power we have to draw from CEBECO III during cloudy periods, it will be a positive. There is no cost to getting a net metering meter except for the cost for the electrician to swap out the meters. The power company supplies the new meter at no charge, so unless I am missing something, it makes sense for us to do that.

Will be very interested to hear how you go with this and whether it is viable. I had a 6.57k/Wh system (18 x 365 Watt panels) installed here in Sydney last November, and am very satisfied with it. It has cut our electricity bills by around 75%. Had me wondering if similar savings could be obtained in Cebu.

My system doesn't help with brownouts ("blackouts" here in Oz) as it automatically shuts down in the event of a brownout, apparently to stop the solar systems pumping electricity into the grid while it is being repaired. We looked at the battery option, but the retailer recommended waiting a few years, as the savings wouldn't exceed current battery costs. It is expected battery costs will drop significantly within a few years, at which time we'll add a battery to the system.

Your Philippine Department of Energy link has some very useful information. Interesting that it estimates a break-even time of 8 years, compared to the 4.07 years on mine. Probably due to a combination of initial cost, feed in rates and amount of sunlight available.

 

On 8/20/2021 at 6:06 PM, cookie47 said:

Of course he still has the benefit of solar but no where near the hype that was presented by the electricity company when he installed.. As far as I can tell only one state and the Northern Territory have keped input credits.

We received the Australian Government's renewable energy rebate (STCs) when we installed the system last October, and I think this is still available. Our feed in rate is currently $0.17 k/Wh, better than the $0.10 in the retailer's original estimate when working out the pay back time.

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cookie47
2 hours ago, mikewright said:

Will be very interested to hear how you go with this and whether it is viable. I had a 6.57k/Wh system (18 x 365 Watt panels) installed here in Sydney last November, and am very satisfied with it. It has cut our electricity bills by around 75%. Had me wondering if similar savings could be obtained in Cebu.

My system doesn't help with brownouts ("blackouts" here in Oz) as it automatically shuts down in the event of a brownout, apparently to stop the solar systems pumping electricity into the grid while it is being repaired. We looked at the battery option, but the retailer recommended waiting a few years, as the savings wouldn't exceed current battery costs. It is expected battery costs will drop significantly within a few years, at which time we'll add a battery to the system.

Your Philippine Department of Energy link has some very useful information. Interesting that it estimates a break-even time of 8 years, compared to the 4.07 years on mine. Probably due to a combination of initial cost, feed in rates and amount of sunlight available.

 

We received the Australian Government's renewable energy rebate (STCs) when we installed the system last October, and I think this is still available. Our feed in rate is currently $0.17 k/Wh, better than the $0.10 in the retailer's original estimate when working out the pay back time.

 

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cookie47
4 hours ago, mikewright said:

Our feed in rate is currently $0.17 k/Wh, better than the $0.10 in the retailer's original estimate when working out the pay back time.

Ahh, Thanks...I think my Nephew has his for about 10 year's..

Apparently "I stand corrected" but I think the feed in rate depends on the accual retailer so can change area by area. although I guess the rebates on installing are Federal ?

Anyway enjoy...

 

 

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RogerDuMond
3 hours ago, cookie47 said:

but I think the feed in rate depends on the accual retailer so can change area by area.

I don't know how it works in other places, but according to CEBECO III, they would pay me what they pay for power which is currently 3.8 pesos. It is also about 1/3 of what they charge.

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SkyMan
On 8/19/2021 at 5:35 PM, noddle said:

If you export during the day and get credit,  you use that credit for your power usage at night....   ( depending on what you get per kWh on your export rate )

That's how you'd like to think it works. 

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noddle

 

 

16 hours ago, mikewright said:

 Our feed in rate is currently $0.17 k/Wh, better than the $0.10 in the retailer's original estimate when working out the pay back time.

11 hours ago, cookie47 said:

Ahh, Thanks...I think my Nephew has his for about 10 year's..

Apparently "I stand corrected" but I think the feed in rate depends on the accual retailer so can change area by area. although I guess the rebates on installing are Federal ?

Anyway enjoy...

When I first got my 5kW solar  system,  I was been paid 0.28c kWh for the first 6 years ( never had a power bill),  then 2 years ago the 'only' electric company (in Tasmania), with the local government decided to change that to 0.07cents

So again I'm getting power bills of about $400-$500 a quarter...  ( if I was retired and at home all day then I could 'use' the power I make, instead of selling it for nothing )

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