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cookie47
2 hours ago, Soupeod said:

Geez….

 

Book me a ticket. Quick.....Frk Covide.

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"Hat trick" did not originate with Hockey.

The origins of the phrase don’t have anything to do with hockey at all. In fact, the first use of the term “hat trick” comes from a specific cricket match from 1858. Bowler H.H. Stephenson, playing for an all-England squad versus a team from Hallam, South Yorkshire, took three consecutive wickets at Hyde Park Cricket Grounds in Sheffield—meaning he hit the three wooden stakes behind the batter three consecutive times. A collection was held because of his outstanding feat and he was presented with a hat that was bought using the proceeds.

Just when the phrase made the jump to ice hockey and other sports is a matter of debate (the Online Etymology Dictionary says it's 1909, while other sources believe it didn't happen until the 1940s), and the exact source of the phrase being popularized is still fairly hazy. One Montreal haberdasher called “Henri Henri” claims they coined the phrase after they began rewarding all players who scored three goals during one game at the Montreal Forum with a free hat. Another claim comes from the Canadian city of Guelph, whose 1947 Junior-A team was sponsored by Biltmore Hats and dubbed the “Guelph Biltmore Mad Hatters.” As a marketing ploy to advertise its new style of fedora, the company would give away a brand new hat to any league player who scored three goals in a single game. 

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10 hours ago, SkyMan said:

cricket match from 1858.

Yep,As a cricket fan I'll go with that

 

10 hours ago, SkyMan said:

three wooden stakes

Err......Stumps...😂

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Salty Dog

In 2010, Apple sold its 10 billionth song through the iTunes Store.

The song was "Guess Things Happen That Way" by Johnny Cash and the purchaser received a $10,000 iTunes gift card.

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Salty Dog

There are tons of technology terms floating around us every day that have firm roots that can be connected to existing words, contractions, or cultural references. Ethernet, the ubiquitous wired network standard? Robert Metcalfe, a computer scientist who co-developed it at Xerox PARC in the 1970s, named it after the “ether”, the material people used to believe existed in space between the Sun and the Earth to serve as a propagation medium for light. Bluetooth? The Bluetooth wireless protocol was created at Ericsson Mobile and the term Bluetooth is a direct nod to the nickname of a very famous Danish king, Harald “Bluetooth” Gormsson (even the Bluetooth symbol is a bind rune of Harald’s initials). Emoticons? Just a portmanteau of the words “emotion” and “icon” since an emoticon is meant to iconographically portray an emotion.

With that in mind, it would be easy to assume that “Wi-Fi” stood for something. Alas, despite the absolute ubiquity of Wi-Fi in the modern world, there’s no fun backstory. It doesn’t stand for “wireless fidelity” despite how often that claim is repeated. It stands for… nothing. It’s not a contraction, an acronym, or a portmanteau. In fact, the whole “wireless fidelity” thing was applied after the fact. The reality is that the organization that would become the Wi-Fi Alliance simply selected “Wi-Fi” because it was easy to say, had a nice balance to it, and was a bit of a pun on the old stereo “Hi-Fi” terminology. Later, when the marketing people for the organization were pressed for an explanation, they claimed that the term was shorthand for “wireless fidelity” (a play on the term “high fidelity”) and for a very brief period around the year 2000 (until the Alliance put an end it), the retroactively applied phrase was used frequently in the media. In reality, however, there was never any wireless fidelity, only Wi-Fi.

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cookie47
4 hours ago, Salty Dog said:

only Wi-Fi.

Good article..It's always been said that an Australian invented WIFI.but it's a bit grey as it was a team of scientists led by an Australian that is more correct. However I did find this article below that adds more intrigue to the matter.

________________________________

Who doesn’t love Hedy Lamarr, the Austrian-born movie actress who starred in such classic movies as 1941’s Ziegfeld Girl or 1944’s Experiment Perilous? Of course, if the life of a glamorous movie star of the black and white era doesn’t interest you, there’s also the minor fact that she invented a device that would eventually lead to the development of GPS, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth technology.

According to a new book, Hedy’s Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World by Richard Rhodes, Lamarr and her business partner George Antheil were awarded a patent in 1942 for a “secret communication system” intended for radio-guided torpedoes that would become the bedrock of modern mobile communication technology.

Their patent, for what was called a frequency-hopping spread-spectrum invention, centered around the idea of frequency hopping using a piano roll to change between 88 frequencies. Lamarr was inspired by Antheil’s earlier experimentation with automated musical instruments, including his 1924 soundtrack for the film Ballet Mecanique. At the time, their gift to the world went nowhere. Or, more correctly, it went to the U.S. Navy, who filed it away and didn’t investigate the idea for 20 years until it was put into practice during a military blockade of Cuba.

If the U.S. Navy wasn’t sufficiently appreciative, the rest of the world wasn’t so willing to ignore the non-acting talents of the woman who’d made the world safe for cell companies everywhere; in 1998, Wi-LAN bought 49% of Lamarr’s claim to the lapsed patent for an undisclosed sum, and Germany has been celebrating Inventors Day on Lamarr’s birthday, November 9, since 2005. Not bad for a woman whose largest contribution to the world had previously been considered to have been her looks during MGM’s Golden Age.

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Salty Dog

Did you know that Mikhail Gorbachev, Former President of the Soviet Union, did a Pizza Hut commercial?

 

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cookie47
Damn,,that's alot of puppies..
image.thumb.png.f937ea946309c31ba319695a3ba98fa9.png
Just imagine living in that household.

"Anyone in the bathroom"!?

Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk

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16 hours ago, cookie47 said:

Just imagine living in that household.

"Anyone in the bathroom"!?

Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk
 

"Saddle Trenches" in the garden!

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