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cost of building in Badian


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Agreed. There is no poured concrete cross beams but the entire structure is held together with Fresh coco lumber with rebars wrapped around them and welded together at the posts. When coco lumber dries it is as hard as a rock and will be enough to tie a single story unit like this together.

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4 hours ago, Dafey said:

Agreed. There is no poured concrete cross beams but the entire structure is held together with Fresh coco lumber with rebars wrapped around them and welded together at the posts. When coco lumber dries it is as hard as a rock and will be enough to tie a single story unit like this together.

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Quite a good strong roof, very well made and if the bottom third of the Coco Palm has been used and especially the outer parts it is very strong, but in my honest opinion, this structure has serious flaws, even if a beam had been used all around it would have done no good anyway, I can see the pillars have not been done in one pour!!! this is a big No No,  joints are visible, this is a bit like breaking a candle melting the wax at the break and sticking it together, it will always break at this same point.

It gives me no pleasure to tell you this, but I advise you to tell your BIL to get the F out of there as soon as he feels the first tremor of an earthquake, if it were to be anything serious that house is coming down.

Try and google the Philippine handbook of good building practise, read that and it will back up most of what I say here.

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2 hours ago, dave1952 said:

in my honest opinion, this structure has serious flaws

In my honest opinion...welcome to the Philippines!

 

2 hours ago, dave1952 said:

I advise you to tell your BIL to get the F out of there as soon as he feels the first tremor of an earthquake

It will be fine. If we have an earthquake big enough to split the pillars at the point of the pour, they have bigger problems. Also, every 1 story house within 100 KMs.

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15 hours ago, Dafey said:

Agreed. There is no poured concrete cross beams but the entire structure is held together with Fresh coco lumber with rebars wrapped around them and welded together at the posts. When coco lumber dries it is as hard as a rock and will be enough to tie a single story unit like this together.

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Same type roof on MIL's house survived Yolanda, one of the few in the brgy.

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6 hours ago, cvgtpc1 said:

Same type roof on MIL's house survived Yolanda, one of the few in the brgy.

I can see it is a very well made strong roof and the profile is probably just right for here if it was to encounter high winds, at this moment I am also building a house, now the roof is on and half sheeted I am beginning to wonder if I have gone the right way? I would send a Pic of it but I do not know how to reduce the file size to fit the 1.95MB allowed?

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4 minutes ago, dave1952 said:

I can see it is a very well made strong roof and the profile is probably just right for here if it was to encounter high winds, at this moment I am also building a house, now the roof is on and half sheeted I am beginning to wonder if I have gone the right way? I would send a Pic of it but I do not know how to reduce the file size to fit the 1.95MB allowed? I did manage to reduce it after all.

 

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2 minutes ago, dave1952 said:

 

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This is the Pillar and Beam structure it sits on, all done in welded steel, the steel will be infilled with steel stud channels and then Hardiflex fixed to that

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Did the designer address wind and seismic shear loads? None in the pic? 
 

Local provincial welds, or real welds?

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7 hours ago, Daddle said:

Did the designer address wind and seismic shear loads? None in the pic? 
 

Local provincial welds, or real welds?

Maybe you can enlighten me Sir, how do you tell from a Picture of a house that it has been has been designed with wind and shear loads? maybe I am missing something and must address this?

The welding has all been done in Flux Cored Mig, I cannot think what you are getting at Provincial Welds, I have never heard this term before? I don't want to sound racist here but perhaps you are Chinese using some form of translator? I'm sure you mean well and have have something relevant to say but it is not quite getting through to me? please be patient with me, understand I am an old man and only understand English formed from the Oxford Dictionary, most translators use the Jester Dictionary. 

Please understand I am Scottish Man and we are known to be the least prejudiced people in the whole wide world, We dislike everybody!!! in fact we do not even like our fellow Scotsmen all that much.

 

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1 hour ago, dave1952 said:

Maybe you can enlighten me Sir, how do you tell from a Picture of a house that it has been has been designed with wind and shear loads? maybe I am missing something and must address this?

The welding has all been done in Flux Cored Mig, I cannot think what you are getting at Provincial Welds, I have never heard this term before? I don't want to sound racist here but perhaps you are Chinese using some form of translator? I'm sure you mean well and have have something relevant to say but it is not quite getting through to me? please be patient with me, understand I am an old man and only understand English formed from the Oxford Dictionary, most translators use the Jester Dictionary. 

Please understand I am Scottish Man and we are known to be the least prejudiced people in the whole wide world, We dislike everybody!!! in fact we do not even like our fellow Scotsmen all that much.

 

I just asked some questions based on your picture and statements. The picture strongly implies that wind and seismic shear in the columns and walls may not have been fully considered. Open sided “L” section columns secured by welding to a single bit of slab rebar. That is what I see. Woeful fixing to the girders. Etc etc. However I could be wrong, though I doubt it. Please enlighten us.

I described as “provincial” the typical welds made in any remote area far from professional training, supervision and inspection. Matters not the technology, e.g. MIG. Extrapolating from the random appearance of the structural members I can predict that the weld quality is equally random. The race of the welder matters not. For example, a famous failure was the University of Aberdeen (Scotland) Zoology building which collapsed from the failure of the particularly poor welding. Five dead

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6 hours ago, Daddle said:

I just asked some questions based on your picture and statements. The picture strongly implies that wind and seismic shear in the columns and walls may not have been fully considered. Open sided “L” section columns secured by welding to a single bit of slab rebar. That is what I see. Woeful fixing to the girders. Etc etc. However I could be wrong, though I doubt it. Please enlighten us.

I described as “provincial” the typical welds made in any remote area far from professional training, supervision and inspection. Matters not the technology, e.g. MIG. Extrapolating from the random appearance of the structural members I can predict that the weld quality is equally random. The race of the welder matters not. For example, a famous failure was the University of Aberdeen (Scotland) Zoology building which collapsed from the failure of the particularly poor welding. Five dead

Sorry Sir, last night when I replied to you I had just returned from the Bar and can now see there was some gibberish in my reply, OK from the bottom up; First a Monolithic slab was laid, within this slab are steel cages all around the edge and three down the middle, like beams laid on their sides at 350mm in depth, between these is a 150mm slab, done in ready mix, the rebar anchors were cast into this, they are not welded to the frame but bolted, welding rebar is not easy to do, working on such an uneven surface, all the pillars also have expanding bolts fitted as well as the rebar anchor.

If you have no experience of welding, especially Mig? you would be surprised at just how good they and how easy to operate, they are a world apart from Arc/stick although use the same principle, it is no exaggeration when I say, give this to anyone that has never welded before and within 30 mins of practice they will be producing good quality welds, providing the setting are correct for the given weight of steel, every 8ft of beam/pillar has 500grms of weld wire on it, within the whole structure 50kgs of welded wire has been used, at a cost of P25K so it is expensive, probably three times more than Stick welding? the machine only cost P5K. I can say in complete confidence that all the welding in this structure is as good as it gets. The roof of this structure is fully vented, the two hips are 20CM lower than the middle section which overlaps the two of them, all covered in Plastic Imac roofing, cost of which was P216K for 280M2. Would I recommend this build method to anyone? No definitely Not! better to have gone with the traditional Post and Beam method done in concrete, up till now this structure as it stands when the roof sheets are on has cost me P1 Million,  I expect the small house 2bed 2 bath and small sitting room plus outdoor kitchen will cost another 3/4 of a Million to build? 

Do I really know what I am doing, that is also questionable? I have never built a house in my life before, Being and Idiot Savant I must do everything different to the norm here, the sheep that build in CHB, without a doubt I have the Idiot part right but not so sure about the other?

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Let's stay on topic peeps...cost of building in Badian is the topic

 

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12 minutes ago, Dafey said:

Let's stay on topic peeps...cost of building in Badian is the topic

 

Sorry about that Sir, there is an easy answer to that question.

Look on the Phil South site and there is a section there that tells all about the cost of building here in the Philippines and even how costs are different from one place to another, I found this to be quite accurate on the costing here in my area.

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The cost of building varies directly with quality and safety. @dave1952 your choice of MIG over stick welding was wise given the available skills in most areas. Much greater expense initially. Some savings later as the joints won’t immediately gone apart. 
 

I’m still concerned with your lack of bracing against shear forces. Seems some diagonals would be prudent. A couple in each corner would not be very expensive. The provincial builders foolishly rely on the post-to-girder joints. Those often fail spectacularly in a quake. In that case a few solid reinforced CHB walls can do wonders in preventing death by crushing. Around here the builders simply point out that the building did not immediately fall down so it must be okay. Gotta admire living in the moment, though. Never mind the future cost in lives and treasure.

We are building in a remote province. Far from warehouses like Badian appears to be. We have not noticed much difference in the prices of products. Apparently transport is cheap. However I marvel at the quality of things like CHB when anywhere near Manila. Unless one is very careful the CHB here lacks any strength whatsoever. Huge savings in cost, for somebody, certainly. 

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