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Why prescription glasses are so expensive in US ($400+) vs here ($14 / $20)


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cookie47
24 minutes ago, to_dave007 said:

I've had bifocals for a few years

Ahh,Are they bifocals OR transition lenses 

Bi Focals have been around since the wheel..My first Transitions I had in about 2008.Far better as the change within close and far distance changes slowly rather than having what essentially is two seperate Lenses.

BTW I have exactly the same problem as you .. Distance good, Reading Good, However..Normal Laptop distance not Good..

The optician says its age related.      .....NICE..

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I think you are confusing progressive with transition lenses. Transition are lenses that change with light conditions from dark to light or vice versa. Progressive lenses are a type of multi

I have trifocals with the lines, not progressives. When I first went from bifocals to trifocals about 4 years ago, I had friends that told me the progressives were really hard to get used to...like Da

Have been wearing glasses for a long time as well. Was getting my glasses at Costco for the last ten years and they were averaging $125 a pair for regular prescription with tint and anti-scratch coati

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Salty Dog

I think you are confusing progressive with transition lenses.

Transition are lenses that change with light conditions from dark to light or vice versa.

Progressive lenses are a type of multifocal lens. These lenses allow you to see clearly at multiple distances without a line between the different focal lengths. This allows you to do close-up work (like reading a book), middle-distance work (like checking out a website on a computer), or distance viewing (like driving) without needing to change your glasses.

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cookie47
22 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

confusing 

Yes your correct ,,AGAIN haa. 

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cookie47

Just a little snippet of information.

The very early Transitions were very slow to change.Thus if you walked into a dark Room (like a cinema) from bright sunlight  FAAAK.  Couldn't see a thing.

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HeyMike

I would like to get real glass for my bifocals. I could not find a place in New Jersey when I was there. I hope to be able to get them here.

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Dafey
4 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

Sick and tired of taking them off so often when I need to focus on something within reach.

That's what trifocals are for.

7 hours ago, cookie47 said:

I've had "Transitions"  for a while now

Tried them and can't get used to them. If I want to look to the left I have to turn my whole head instead of just my eyes. I know, sounds petty but I have given them an honest try a couple of times with good optics, they are not for me.

5 hours ago, BossHog said:

Think I've mentioned this to you before, but the optometrist in Banilad Town Centre does a good job with tri-focals.

Thanks, Boss. Next time in Cebu I'll check them out.

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cookie47
4 minutes ago, Dafey said:

Tried them and can't get used to them

Yes its true,, I do appreciate that. On my first foray the optician did make it quite clear (no pun intended).that there are some people that struggle to get used to them.He in fact advised me to walk around the shopping centre for a period before driving but to be honest 30 minutes and I was fine...

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Salty Dog
2 hours ago, Dafey said:

Tried them and can't get used to them. If I want to look to the left I have to turn my whole head instead of just my eyes. I know, sounds petty but I have given them an honest try a couple of times with good optics, they are not for me.

7 hours ago, BossHog said:

My first few pair were like that, but the ones I have now have a wide angle of view. When I got them about 5 years ago, they were considered state of the art because of that...

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cvgtpc1

I'm thinking next pair might be in a sunglass frame.  Seems sunglasses just fit and feel much better in my case.  With transition lenses, will really fit the bill.

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Salty Dog
3 hours ago, cvgtpc1 said:

I'm thinking next pair might be in a sunglass frame.  Seems sunglasses just fit and feel much better in my case.  With transition lenses, will really fit the bill.

Many sunglasses are one piece plastic rims with built-in fixed nose pads.

Diagram-of-Eyeglasses-Parts-of-Eyeglass-Frame.jpg

 

Where as regular glasses tend to be metal or plastic, but with separate adjustable nose pads.

 

DwFBQhyWwAAtTro.jpg

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mikecon3

I have trifocals with the lines, not progressives. When I first went from bifocals to trifocals about 4 years ago, I had friends that told me the progressives were really hard to get used to...like Dafey said. I was walking up and down a lot of steps at the time, and opted against the progressives. I'm sure they are better quality now than they were then, and since I'm used to the trifocals now the progressives shouldn't be too hard to adjust to...I may give them a shot.

My Ray Ban sunglasses are prescription. But I didn't get the trifocals, since the middle lens was for sitting at the computer. I can see far with the top lens and the instrument panel with the lower lens.

I've always like the feel of Ray Ban's, and both of my frames are that style...I don't like the nose pads. My wife, on the other hand, has to have them, or they just fall off her flat nose!

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lamoe
Posted (edited)

I've found these to be the most comfortable on side of head. Can adjust temple tips for proper face fit rather than nose pieces which bend over time

image.png.4d19fe31e6bd5f934a623d0440774ee7.png

Edited by lamoe
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cvgtpc1
1 hour ago, mikecon3 said:

I have trifocals with the lines, not progressives. When I first went from bifocals to trifocals about 4 years ago, I had friends that told me the progressives were really hard to get used to...like Dafey said. I was walking up and down a lot of steps at the time, and opted against the progressives. I'm sure they are better quality now than they were then, and since I'm used to the trifocals now the progressives shouldn't be too hard to adjust to...I may give them a shot.

My Ray Ban sunglasses are prescription. But I didn't get the trifocals, since the middle lens was for sitting at the computer. I can see far with the top lens and the instrument panel with the lower lens.

I've always like the feel of Ray Ban's, and both of my frames are that style...I don't like the nose pads. My wife, on the other hand, has to have them, or they just fall off her flat nose!

Exactly why I made my sunglass comment earlier...my Raybans feels so much better than my standard glasses.

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Dafey
11 hours ago, Salty Dog said:

My first few pair were like that, but the ones I have now have a wide angle of view. When I got them about 5 years ago, they were considered state of the art because of that...

Where did you get those?

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GwapoGuy

Have been wearing glasses for a long time as well. Was getting my glasses at Costco for the last ten years and they were averaging $125 a pair for regular prescription with tint and anti-scratch coating. If you need an eye exam, it's around $100 more. Very good quality, imported frames which would last me a good five years. Of course you need to be a member.

Now my go to shop is Warby Parker, the best thing to ever happen to the eye glass business! If you are not close to one of their newly opened retail locations, they will send you up to five frames to try on at home. All their frames are first class acetate or titanium made in Europe. Coated polycarbonate lenses are standard. Progressive lenses are much more expensive but my last pair cost me $99.00.

On the other hand, the last time I was in town, stopped into Country Mall and had a look see at the optical shop. The clerk was a young guy in his early 20's who had difficulty helping me. He called the optometrist from the back, who sized me up and gave me a price around 17K for glasses that were fairly plain. :unsure:

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