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Lawmaker Urges For Reforms To Foreign Land Ownership In The Philippines


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Soupeod
3 hours ago, hyaku said:

I don't think is as much about the ownership as what foreigners are prepared to pay.

We have a large plot next door to our house and land. I had bought to keep off any new possibly noisy neighbors. Bought it for song at 40k after a lady offered it to me four times. So one up from that is yet another plot. A friends mother had sold it some time ago for 35k I was offered this one too at 100k but declined.

So a foreigner has bought it at 3.7 million. They have not even completed title deeds on it yet, So for sure he does not own it but has pushed the land price way up paying silly money. 

Mines up for sale now with seven potential customers, most of them connected to a foreigner. We will be laughing all the way to the bank with a ridiculous profit we never envisioned.

Biliran price increases are crazy due to stupid foreigners paying millions.

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So...It is important that foreigners only own land to their disadvantage? Cool.   

Strictly for investment. There are thousands of investment schemes where people purchase properties purely for rental returns and resale. Investors own real estate in places they can never even get a

Yeah it should read  

Kreole

In no way will this benefit the citizens of the PH.  That is a blatant lie.  The evidence is visible in every developing country that opened its land to foreigners, who then bid the price up out of reach of any "citizen" except for the already entrenched "elite" who are already dripping with greed, as are some of the rich foreigners who purchase such land.  Not to say that all foreigners who want to purchase land in a foreign country are rich or avaricious, but as the land values increase, the number of people who can afford to pay decreases.  No doubt the Chinese would be first to benefit, along with a small segment of the population who own land in desirable locations.  There are no success stories for the majority of people who make up the landless population.

Edited by Kreole
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3 hours ago, Kreole said:

as the land values increase, the number of people who can afford to pay decreases. 

The important conclusion is what you didn't add: people will be priced out from the currently desirable locations and will move to where they can afford to pay, and money won't be so concentrated around two or three cities.

Long-term benefits for everyone include a more developed country with more desirable locations.

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lamoe
15 hours ago, RogerDuMond said:

The same as everyone else.

 

12 hours ago, Soupeod said:

Same price as Filipinos here in Ormoc City... where do you go to the local market? 

Cebu City Carbon - Tata shops - I wait with wheeled cart -  weighed it one time 10 Kg

I go for bananas to usual vendor  - 48P Kg - have checked price without her at a different one 65P

It's a matter of them knowing you - same with local street market - I pay what others pay.

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Kreole
6 hours ago, Fresh said:

The important conclusion is what you didn't add: people will be priced out from the currently desirable locations and will move to where they can afford to pay, and money won't be so concentrated around two or three cities.

Long-term benefits for everyone include a more developed country with more desirable locations.

These "people" whose families have lived there for generations will be forced out to live in less desirable locations like along water ways or slums that are prone to overcrowding and/or flooding.  Sounds really fair to me.  That is the model for population displacement not just in 3rd world countries but even developed countries.  In the developed world it is called "gentrification".  One other wedge the government uses is to raise the taxes on the increased land values to the point that those "people" cannot afford to pay them and have to leave.  Either way they are fuked.

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smokey
9 hours ago, Kreole said:

In no way will this benefit the citizens of the PH.  That is a blatant lie.  The evidence is visible in every developing country that opened its land to foreigners, who then bid the price up out of reach of any "citizen" except for the already entrenched "elite" who are already dripping with greed, as are some of the rich foreigners who purchase such land.  Not to say that all foreigners who want to purchase land in a foreign country are rich or avaricious, but as the land values increase, the number of people who can afford to pay decreases.  No doubt the Chinese would be first to benefit, along with a small segment of the population who own land in desirable locations.  There are no success stories for the majority of people who make up the landless population.

Shee i still remember .y dad screaming in 1960ss  dam Japanese will own everything we will be living in the streets    then the 80sss chinese will own everything in 10 years 

8 minutes ago, Kreole said:

These "people" whose families have lived there for generations will be forced out to live in less desirable locations like along water ways or slums that are prone to overcrowding and/or flooding.  Sounds really fair to me.  That is the model for population displacement not just in 3rd world countries but even developed countries.  In the developed world it is called "gentrification".  One other wedge the government uses is to raise the taxes on the increased land values to the point that those "people" cannot afford to pay them and have to leave.  Either way they are fuked.

No the families will move to maria lucia   or forbes park

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hyaku
2 hours ago, lamoe said:

 

Cebu City Carbon - Tata shops - I wait with wheeled cart -  weighed it one time 10 Kg

I go for bananas to usual vendor  - 48P Kg - have checked price without her at a different one 65P

It's a matter of them knowing you - same with local street market - I pay what others pay.

Sold at 1 peso for two bananas here.

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lamoe
2 hours ago, hyaku said:

Sold at 1 peso for two bananas here.

Not worth the gas to get there :tongue_01:

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15 hours ago, Kreole said:

These "people" whose families have lived there for generations will be forced out to live in less desirable locations

Not sure why you're quoting "people",  the point is that those less desirable locations won't have to be in the two or three urbanized cities anymore, that's the long-term benefits of opening the market to everyone. As people are priced out of urban areas, rural areas become suburban. There's a reason suburbia doesn't currently exist in the PH, and that reason is money. Open the market to everyone and the money pours in.

 

 

 

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jaybee747
26 minutes ago, Fresh said:

There's a reason suburbia doesn't currently exist in the PH, and that reason is money. Open the market to everyone and the money pours in.

Just money will not create suburbia in the PH, you need a critical mass of private cars ownership and highways.

Edited by jaybee747
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lamoe
6 hours ago, Fresh said:

Not sure why you're quoting "people",  the point is that those less desirable locations won't have to be in the two or three urbanized cities anymore, that's the long-term benefits of opening the market to everyone. As people are priced out of urban areas, rural areas become suburban. There's a reason suburbia doesn't currently exist in the PH, and that reason is money. Open the market to everyone and the money pours in.

A different take based on US experience. Roads precede suburbs and the roads here did not allow for much expansion except for more condos. My place to Pardo - major roads all the way - 9 am on a Saturday  - 9 Km (5 1/2 miles)= 30 /35 mim - Sunday 25 min
 

Quote

https://www.vox.com/2015/5/14/8605917/highways-interstate-cities-history

Highways gutted American cities. So why did they build them?

 

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6 hours ago, jaybee747 said:

Just money will not create suburbia in the PH, you need a critical mass of private cars ownership and highways.

What pays for cars and highways?

1 hour ago, lamoe said:

Roads precede suburbs

And money is required for that infrastructure development, these are all long-term benefits of opening up real estate markets.

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1 hour ago, lamoe said:

the roads here did not allow for much expansion

That's the situation now, under an extremely limited market. When you open the real estate markets, the demand for more desirable places grows, infrastructure grows, and that's how suburbs happen.

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fred42
On 2/19/2021 at 11:00 PM, Kreole said:

In no way will this benefit the citizens of the PH.  That is a blatant lie.  The evidence is visible in every developing country that opened its land to foreigners, who then bid the price up out of reach of any "citizen" except for the already entrenched "elite" who are already dripping with greed, as are some of the rich foreigners who purchase such land.  Not to say that all foreigners who want to purchase land in a foreign country are rich or avaricious, but as the land values increase, the number of people who can afford to pay decreases.  No doubt the Chinese would be first to benefit, along with a small segment of the population who own land in desirable locations.  There are no success stories for the majority of people who make up the landless population.

They benefit when they sell their land at market price and receive lots of cash. Their choice to sell or not.
Foreigners will never have rights to buy land here and yet the prices still increase like crazy.. In the 35 years Ive been visiting and living here,I have never once seen a price drop in the property market.. Even during the Asian economic depression. You blame foreigners for that? 
What about rich OFW`s and Filipino seamen buying up all the land here at stupid prices?
Are they to blame also?


 

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jaybee747
35 minutes ago, Fresh said:

What pays for cars and highways?

And money is required for that infrastructure development, these are all long-term benefits of opening up real estate markets.

So please explain how it is going to work? Most lower class or poor filipinos who live in urban centers are just renters, so if rich foreigner is paying top pesos to buy the property, they will get evicted, do you think the landlord is going to give them a house in the suburb, a car and build them an highway so they will not spend hours getting to their job? You are right, it require money but central planing is more important, which is lacking in the PH.

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