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BossHog

Stumbled across this map and found it interesting but I'm a weather nerd, haha. The data is only until 2006 but the last fifteen years have only confirmed the Philippines' spot as a premier typhoon magnet. Think I read somewhere that Guam is #1 but not completely sure.

tropical_cyclone_map.gif.c353a3f5fbe3e919518aae0a96d54d19.gif

 

Like streamers of splattered paint, the tracks of nearly 150 years of tropical cyclones weave across the globe in this map. The map is based on all storm tracks available from the National Hurricane Center and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center through September 2006. The accumulation of tracks reveals several details of hurricane climatology, such as where the most severe storms form and the large-scale atmospheric patterns that influence the track of hurricanes.

Over time, the repeated passage of strong storms through the same regions creates solid swashes of color: bright red in the Western Pacific near the Philippines, where numerous Category 5 storms have traveled; orange and gold in the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico, where Category 3 and 4 storms often pass. The blues and light yellows reveal storms in a weaker state: near the equator, in their first stages of development; over land, as they run out of steam; in the mid-latitudes, where they encounter cooler waters.

The absence of hurricanes at and very near the equator reveals another important factor in hurricane development: the Coriolis force. The Coriolis force results from the Earth’s spherical shape and its rotation. The force keeps air from moving in a straight line across the surface of the Earth. Instead, the Coriolis force spins moving air to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. The Coriolis force is strongest near the poles, and zero at the equator. Although frequent thunderstorms do occur at the equator, the air rushing into the low-pressure centers of these storms doesn’t get the needed “spin” from the Coriolis force, and so the storms don’t develop the large-scale rotation that sets them on the path to becoming hurricanes.

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/7079/historic-tropical-cyclone-tracks?fbclid=IwAR3eyPy48vffPJNje29wWZaeppb0iJfvA0BVqL1LJOqCbY-QJWvcRXYllKw

Edited by BossHog
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Dafey

Soooo...the southern tip of Mindanao is safe?

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BossHog
13 hours ago, Dafey said:

Soooo...the southern tip of Mindanao is safe?

Relative proximity to the equator and the resulting Coriolus Effect which inhibits vorticity means they're fairly safe from typhoons there...but not from earthquakes!

Edited by BossHog
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SkyMan

Looks like the whole of South America is pretty safe or is that because of little to no data?

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