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Vaccinations in the Philippines


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Dafey

@rfm010, Thanks for the extensive and honest report.

My concern is similar to yours. I want the family to trust the vaccines which can be an issue here in the Philippines. For years now I've been urging the family members to be vaccinated and especiaslly to have the children vaccinated.

The biggest challenge is my MIL. She has that built in fear already and then hears about the AZ vaccine being "banned" in certain countries. She works with the Barangay, (pro bono), and has been offered front liner status. She is 70 and a recovered TB survivor. Although she still is on meds for heart and has a respirator for the times she has a hard time breathing. So she's a real target for the Covi19 and probably would be hit very hard by it.

Mom was nearly in tears explaining to me her fear of the AZ vaccine and I gave her my blessing to pass but to ask the Captain if there was another vaccine option for her.

You can imagine if I strong armed her to get the vaccine and then she dies...of anything...I would probably be poisoned but the rest of the family.

Personally I'd take whatever vaccine is offered at this point and have told Mom to tell the Barangay that if they have leftovers that nobody wants to call me before they throw it away!

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Got my first sinovac shot yesterday, city sponored done at a local school as a walk in.  Another school down the road was by appointment only.  3 hours of form filling and waiting.  Lines to pick up f

Only problem is that after a few hours, you still want another vaccine.  Aren

Update for Consolacion. I had previously registered with my Barangay health center and was told they would call when they had a schedule for Lamac, my Barangay. No issue about being a foreigner. that

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BossHog

The latest information is that access to the vaccine will require your PhilHealth number.

Philippine seniors should be automatically enrolled already. I imagine most if not all foreigners with families here have PhilHealth. Be a good time to update your payment if you haven't done so lately. Even if someone's enrolled or think they are you'll need to have the PIN (PhilHealth Identification Number) ready to go. 

So, @Dafey, to get prepared I'd be checking on your mother-in-law's PhilHealth paperwork. That's exactly what I'm doing today for mine. 

Edited by BossHog
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fivestarph
1 hour ago, BossHog said:

The latest information is that access to the vaccine will require your PhilHealth number.

Philippine seniors should be automatically enrolled already. I imagine most if not all foreigners with families here have PhilHealth. Be a good time to update your payment if you haven't done so lately. Even if someone's enrolled or think they are you'll need to have the PIN (PhilHealth Identification Number) ready to go. 

So, @Dafey, to get prepared I'd be checking on your mother-in-law's PhilHealth paperwork. That's exactly what I'm doing today for mine. 

Slightly different view stated here - 

Metro Manila (CNN Philippines, March 30) — Potential COVID-19 vaccine recipients are not required to have a Philippine Health Insurance Corporation identification number or PIN, the Department of Health clarified Tuesday.

This, after the state health insurer said the ID number is among the "unique identifiers" needed for Filipinos to register for inoculation.

According to the DOH, the PIN is only needed when claiming benefits from PhilHealth in cases of adverse events following immunization. To ensure coverage of Filipinos who experience serious side effects, it added the government will set up PhilHealth registration booths at official vaccination sites.

"The DOH further reiterates that under the Universal Health Care (UHC) Law, all Filipinos, whether direct or indirect contributors, including dependents of contributors, indigent members, senior citizens, and persons with disability, are automatic members of PhilHealth," it wrote in a statement.

 

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BossHog
2 minutes ago, fivestarph said:

Slightly different view stated here

Ah, you know man. Things change so often anymore that it's hard to keep up. Thanks for sharing the clarification.

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rfm010
13 hours ago, BossHog said:

Ah, you know man. Things change so often anymore that it's hard to keep up. Thanks for sharing the clarification.

Dammit.  And i had just given your post a like. 

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redboy

Jumping in late here just to check the vaccine banter among ex pats. As always and forever, there is a plethora of incomplete, conflicting and outright disinformation coming from various agencies and LGO's. The inability of any Filipino concern to organize anything even getting out of a paper bag is well documented, let alone a cohesive national level vaccine roll out. It is a Cluster F**k. Germany is little better as I just read of an expat there traveling back to the US to get vaccinated because he could not penetrate the German health care bureaucracy, so expect here it will be even more disjointed and convoluted. For me the best advice is  to sit tight and take preventative measures, keep your immune system boosted with vitamin D and other nutrients and see what develops. as an example it was reported in the Sun Star that all senior citizens needed to register for a vaccine before April 5th. that was published only 4 days ago, what sense does that make? If a vaccine is offered to me eventually I will probably take it if it isn't sinovac, but until then its relax, keep safe, and your ears open.

Cheers from Consolacion. Happy Easter.

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to_dave007
2 hours ago, redboy said:

The inability of any Filipino concern to organize anything even getting out of a paper bag is well documented, let alone a cohesive national level vaccine roll out.

I disagree.

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redboy
4 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

I disagree.

cool

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fivestarph

Interesting Opinion-

Not so fast, again. First, we hear President Duterte allowing private companies to import vaccines "at will" due to the surge in the number of positive cases over the past week. Private companies have long wanted to procure vaccines for their employees and families but were prevented by guidelines set by the government. Vaccine companies were also prevented from dealing directly with private companies. Naturally, Duterte's statement was lauded by many, effectively removing bureaucratic red tape. "Maski magkano o ilan ang gusto nilang ipasok okay sa akin". Clear, right?

But the Palace immediately clarified companies must still enter into a tripartite agreement with the national government. According to the Palace, the agreement is due to the indemnity clause where the government pays in the event of adverse side effects. I wonder what kind of "adverse side effects" cover? If you get a fever after a jab, you get paid? Or if you become hospitalized? But President Rodrigo Duterte ordered vaccine czar and National Task Force against COVID-19 chief Carlito Galvez Jr. to "sign all documents that would permit the private firms to import their supply of COVID-19 vaccines, regardless of the doses they want to procure." Galvez then goes on to clarify what the president meant was to speed up the process and not remove them from the equation. Government still wants to know what vaccines and how many private companies will bring in.

Nothing is ever clear. The Palace always has to step in, clarify, explain, deflect statements or actions from and by the president. "Joke lang", hyperbole, just stressing a point, and expressing frustration are just some of the spins the Palace utilizes to explain Duterte's statements, pronouncements, or unbelievable actions. It remains to be seen if and when private companies or entities start bringing in vaccines procured on their own, for their own. The urgency to get the most number of people vaccinated is real.

The American vaccines, namely Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson, have yet to reach the country, fueling the conspiracy theories. Supposedly these are the vaccines hard to acquire since they are preferred by many rich countries. According to a doctor I spoke to, these vaccines are also more difficult to produce since they utilize a new method of development as opposed to the other vaccines that use an "old school" way.

But looking at the latest Pulse Survey where six out of 10 Filipinos do not want to be vaccinated, the more pressing matter for the government is to instill trust in any vaccine to attain herd immunity (not herd....never mind). Convincing more than 42 million people vaccines are safe is no easy task. Data compiled by the Our World in Data project at the University of Oxford (ourworldindata.org) shows the country has only 0.5 vaccine doses administered out of a hundred. Not even one dose. Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have us beat at 4.2 and 3.2 respectively. Data also show Palestine, Rwanda, and Guatemala able to get their hands on the Moderna vaccine while Rwanda, Palestine, and Malaysia getting their hands on the Pfizer/BioNtech vaccine which is difficult to store. The data speak for themselves. We are lagging behind so many countries. Countries like Palestine, Rwanda. If they can get the Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech vaccines, why can't we?

https://www.philstar.com/the-freeman/opinion/2021/04/05/2088942/not-so-fast

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BossHog

I don't see a problem here. More than half of the population doesn't want to be vaccinated; the convoluted bureaucracy can't provide the doses anyways until they figure out how to skim the system.

So people refuse the doses that the government can't provide. Seems like a win-win.

I mean, what could possibly go wrong? Oh, wait. Just now reading up on Brazil. Never mind.

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SkyMan

I haven't seen it mentioned but I was wondering if due to the limited supply they are holding back half of the shots for the second jab or are they just hoping more supplies will arrive in time?

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MarinePride

They thing that bothers me is that none of the animals survived the phase 3 long term trails of previous mRNA shots.  Humans are animals too, just something to think about. 

Lots and lots of stuff on the various alternative video sites as to why these shots are bad for humanity.  Just do a search for Dr. Sherri Tenpenny to get started.

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govoner

According to this story the Philippines are bartering nurses to Germany and Britain in exchange for 600,000 shots of the vaccine.

https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/vital-pathway-thousands-filipino-nurses-coming-nz-work-in-doubt

Vital pathway for thousands of Filipino nurses coming to NZ for work in doubt

CORAZON MILLER, 1 NEWS REPORTER

8:25AM • SOURCE:  1 NEWS

A vital pathway for thousands of Filipino nurses coming to New Zealand for work is in doubt, putting their livelihoods and our overburdened healthcare system at risk. 

Philippine Government cracks down on vital pathway for nurses to come to New Zealand

An advisory from the Filipino embassy has put the nurses’ livelihoods and New Zealand’s healthcare system at risk. Source: 1 NEWS

The Philippine government is cracking down on the system that sees its nurses come here for a competency course - with no guarantee of a job at the end of it. 

Its New Zealand embassy is issuing an advisory for nurses in the Philippines against the pathway and advised training providers to stop recruiting Filipino nurses. 

“The Philippine Embassy has been tasked to negotiate an agreement with the New Zealand Government on CAP (competency assessment programme) and other nursing concerns.” 

The latest Nursing Council annual report shows there were 1108 Filipino nurses who arrived here in the last financial year - the greatest single ethnicity of foreign-trained nurses. 

The Philippine is followed by India at 923, United Kingdom with 266, Australia’s 194, and 53 from the United States. 

Melody Opanes-Kircher is a nurse who came to New Zealand via this pathway.

“I have been valued, there are heaps of us in our unit, charge nurses are happy to see us, we are very resilient and we came from a country where there are also very busy places.” 

She says the recent changes have been triggered by what she believes is a desire on the part of the Philippine government to see its nurses offered greater recognition, with a bilateral agreement that would see nurses guaranteed a job before leaving the country. 

“With this one [pathway to NZ] it is very high risk, although lots of Filipino nurses pass the registration and get jobs,” she said.

It’s understood from officials who declined to be interviewed on camera that there are concerns in Manila that the current lack of a job guarantee could open its nurses up to exploitation. 

Their fear is that it could become a pathway for human trafficking that would see their citizens working for low wages in poor conditions. 

In a statement, New Zealand’s Foreign Ministry says it’s working to address any concerns about the programme with Philippine officials. 

1 NEWS understands the Philippine Ambassador will be meeting with the ministry next week to discuss the possibility of a formal agreement that would guarantee nurses a job before they arrive. 

In February, at least eight Filipino nurses were offloaded a plane bound for New Zealand, despite having the necessary paperwork. 1 NEWS understands they have since been given special dispensation to arrive here.

However, New Zealand Nurses Organisation (NZNO) member Monina Hernandez has questioned the timing behind the offloading of the nurses and the embassy’s advisory, when the programme has been running smoothly for years. 

“They know very well that a lot of us have come here over the years,” she said. 

Recently, the Philippine government offered to increase its supply of nurses to Germany and the United Kingdom in exchange for 600,000 doses of Covid-19 vaccines.  

“The Philippine government is trying to gain leverage in terms of vaccines ... but if that’s what they want to happen, it’s a dirty move, it’s not right, they are violating Filipino’s rights,” Hernandez said. 

She says if the Philippines wants to end human trafficking it needs to tackle the issues in country.  

“The reason of course why I think those Filipino nurses want to leave the country is because of poverty,” she said.

“This advisory is a violation of the rights of Filipino nurses to go where they want to go.” 

If a resolution isn’t reached, any potential loss of nurses coming to New Zealand could add to the woes of our health system, which doctors have recently described as being in “crisis”. 

For now, dozens of Filipino nurses are caught up in the political crossfire...waiting in the Philippines for word they’ll be allowed to fly. 

Samantha Yniguez has been waiting two years to get to New Zealand, with latest advisory putting her plans to come to Aotearoa in June this year at risk. 

“I’m completely crushed,” she said.

While she agrees with the push for a bilateral agreement, she’s calling on the authorities to allow those like her, who are already well into the process, to proceed. 

“Give us some consideration because we invested so much in this financially and of course our time.” 

The ER nurse hoped to come to New Zealand to earn a more stable wage for herself, and her family, while bringing her wealth of knowledge into our health system. 

The poor working conditions in the Philippines have put her dreams of having a family of her own on hold. 

“I couldn’t even start a family, with my meagre salary,” she said. “It only provides for myself, my salary isn’t enough to support my siblings or my parents who are already seniors.” 

For Marion Mesina, the advisory has put him in a difficult position with no job, but a huge debt to his family and friends who’d invested in his dream to come to NZ. 

“Hearing this issue is heart-breaking, not only for me but also for those who helped me.” 

The nurse, who has five years of theatre experience, resigned from his previous role, expecting he’d soon be in New Zealand. 

“I don’t have a source of income to provide for my family, I just have people who are helping us at the moment.” 

It is a similar story for Clarissa Talavera who gave up a job in the Middle East after 10 years, to follow her dreams in New Zealand. 

“We invested money, we invested time, also we invested our hopes.” 

Hopes that may not come to fruition, if an agreement can’t be reached by the two nations.

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fivestarph

May be academic but just in-

MANILA, Philippines — The country has run out of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines, the Department of Health (DOH) said Monday.

According to Health Undersecretary Maria Rosario Vergeire, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is currently awaiting additional documents from China’s Sinovac Biotech on the safety of its COVID-19 vaccine for the elderly as AstraZeneca doses have already run out.

“We have coordinated [with Sinovac] already because we know na kailangan natin sa ating country because naubos na ang AstraZeneca doses natin,” Vergeire said in an online press briefing.

(We have coordinated with Sinovac already because we know we need vaccines in the country as AstraZeneca doses have already run out.)

“Gusto natin mabakunahan ang mga matatanda, ang ating mga senior citizens (We want the elderly or senior citizens vaccinated) that’s why we are closely coordinating so we can get the evidence, so FDA can amend their EUA for senior citizens if ever the pieces of evidence will come in,” she added.

AstraZeneca earlier said its COVID-19 vaccine is 80 percent effective at preventing the disease among the elderly.

But for CoronaVac, Sinovac’s vaccine, the FDA only recommended its use for clinically healthy individuals aged 18 to 59 because of the higher efficacy rate among this age group.



Read more: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1414997/ph-runs-out-of-astrazeneca-covid-19-vaccine-doses?utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter&fbclid=IwAR16iR0_J_iTU7kUSDGRTIEQqqZ7lVS8LWQ_PnYWEW-Dx3eFODJZcLI9k1o#Echobox=1617605348#ixzz6r9Ez14n3
 

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BossHog
1 hour ago, fivestarph said:

The country has run out of AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines

It appears Johnson and Johnson has filed today for emergency use in the Philippines. This may be the winner. No major refrigeration issues and it's one shot not two.

More importantly, it would go a long way in increasing vaccine acceptance as it's a recognizable American brand name in d'Phils.

 

Edited by BossHog
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