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Vaccinations in the Philippines


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Sibonga Simon
1 hour ago, SkyMan said:

I'm trying to read the caption.  I'm pretty sure the end of the first line is Witch Doctor but can't read anything else.

That would be a 'specialist' and the charge would be at least 2 chickens....

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Got my first sinovac shot yesterday, city sponored done at a local school as a walk in.  Another school down the road was by appointment only.  3 hours of form filling and waiting.  Lines to pick up f

Only problem is that after a few hours, you still want another vaccine.  Aren

Update for Consolacion. I had previously registered with my Barangay health center and was told they would call when they had a schedule for Lamac, my Barangay. No issue about being a foreigner. that

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arentol

If you're looking for a good laugh...

Check out the link below. It is the Vaccine Queue Calculator for Philippines (created by a Filipino).

The tool itself works fine. The (sad) humor comes when you use it. By default, the tool uses the "Philippine government's target" in the Vaccine Rate field.

Try doing your own calculation using this default setting. And then change the field option to "Current actual rate".

https://www.omnicalculator.com/health/vaccine-queue-philippines

Aren

 

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fivestarph

This should be interesting - 

DOH.jpg

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fivestarph

Have any LIC members tried their luck registering for the COVID Vaccination being a Senior?

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liquido

Can you imagine a foreigner there standing in line to get vaccinated,I wonder how well that will go over with the natives..Is there even a protocol there for foreigners getting vaccinated?? 

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Headshot

According to my doctor, the only vaccine presently available in the Philippines is the Sinovac vaccine from China (you know, the same people who gave us the virus to start with), and it is only available to healthcare workers and high mucky mucks (we don't belong to either group). It is just as well. Several people have already died after receiving a Sinovac vaccination, and there have been a lot of adverse reactions ... not to mention the fact that it has between 20% and 50% efficacy (from several studies) as compared to a 90%+ efficacy for most other vaccines available around the world.

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arentol

Based on the article below, Philippines has still not purchased even 1 Western vaccine.

If the roadblocks keep coming up, there's a chance that Western vaccine makers may even refuse to sell to the Philippines. 

Aren

https://opinion.inquirer.net/138990/where-are-the-vaccines

Quote

Where are the vaccines?

By: Antonio T. Carpio - @inquirerdotnet

Philippine Daily Inquirer / 05:07 AM April 01, 2021

President Duterte railed in September 2020 against Western vaccine manufacturers for requiring vaccine buyers to make advance payments from 30 to 50 percent of the purchase price. The President stated that Philippine law prohibits making advance payments for products still to be produced. However, only an administrative rule, which the President can change any time, prohibits advance payments beyond 15 percent. Existing law expressly allows advance payment without limitation subject to the approval of the President in cases of emergencies or calamities. In fact, several days before the President raised the alleged legal prohibition, the Office of the President authorized the Department of Health to purchase personal protection equipment and other medical paraphernalia with advance payment of up to 50 percent.

The President also declared last March 22, 2021, that it is “illegal” for the government to grant vaccine manufacturers immunity from suit if the vaccines cause death or side effects on those vaccinated. The President further fumed at a proposal to create a government fund to indemnify those who die or suffer side effects from the vaccination, saying that vaccine manufacturers should shoulder such indemnification. The President forgot that he had earlier certified as urgent and necessary the enactment by Congress of a bill granting such immunity from suit to vaccine makers unless there is willful misconduct or gross negligence on the part of vaccine manufacturers. He had also certified the creation of a government-financed indemnity fund. In fact, 23 days before the President ranted against the grant of immunity and the creation of an indemnity fund, he had signed into law the COVID-19 Vaccination Program Act of 2021 precisely granting such immunity and creating a P500-million indemnity fund.

Vaccine manufacturers are, of course, now wary of selling vaccines to the Philippines even with the passage of a law granting them immunity from suit and creating an indemnity fund. Foreigners know only too well that the Duterte administration had torn apart, without any due process, the signed concession contracts of Manila Water and Maynilad Water. The Duterte administration is now forcing the water concessionaires to accept government-dictated concession contracts. Yes, there is law but the Duterte administration does not respect the law. The vaccine manufacturers might require the Duterte administration to expressly retract what the President had stated. It would do well for the President to make the retraction on his own before he is forced to do so. In South America, Pfizer still refuses to sell vaccines to Brazil and Argentina over a dispute on immunity from suit.

Up to now the Philippine government has not purchased any vaccine from Western manufacturers. As the President expressly admitted last March 24, 2021: “Bakunang nabili? Wala. Wala tayong bakunang nabili. Wala pa.” Finance Secretary Sonny Dominguez explained that to procure vaccines, the government has obtained loans from the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. Dominguez said that these loans “are being processed for signing this March 2021 with an indicative aggregate loan amount of US$1.2 billion.” As of end of March 2021, these loan agreements had not yet been signed and thus there are still no funds to buy the Western vaccines.

The significance of the absence of funds is found in Sections 40 and 43, Book VI, of the Administrative Code of 1987: “xxx no expenditures or obligations chargeable against any authorized allotment shall be incurred or authorized in any department xxx without first securing the certification of its Chief Accountant xxx as to the availability of funds xxx. Every payment made in violation of said provisions shall be illegal xxx. Any official or employee of the Government knowingly incurring any obligation or authorizing any expenditure in violation of the provision herein xxx shall be dismissed from the service xxx.” In short, unless funds are actually available, the law prohibits the signing of any government contract to procure vaccines.

This late the national government has not signed a single contract to purchase a single dose of Western vaccine. Is this deliberate or merely incompetence? We just received a shipment of “procured” Chinese vaccines. The Duterte administration must have found available funds from the existing General Appropriations Act to sign the Sinovac contract. Where there is a will, there is a way.

 

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rfm010
13 hours ago, Headshot said:

According to my doctor, the only vaccine presently available in the Philippines is the Sinovac vaccine

Your doctor is wrong.  I know several health care workers ( docs and med students) who have received astra zeneca 1st shots.  I also know four other people in quezon city who have received az first shot.  QC is apparently starting a very slow rollout, dont know how they are choosing people nor for how long supplies will last.  

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Dafey
6 hours ago, rfm010 said:

I also know four other people in quezon city who have received az first shot.

The local Barngay is setting up vaccines for it's workers. MIL is 70 and worried about the AZ vaccine as she has heard some adverse reactions to it, barticularly blood clots.

As our resident Medical Member have you heard good or bad about the AZ vaccine? 

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Raven

https://www.who.int/philippines/news/detail/04-03-2021-philippines-welcomes-the-arrival-of-covid-19-vaccines-via-covax-facility

Quote

Philippines welcomes the arrival of COVID-19 vaccines via COVAX facility

4 March 2021 | Joint News Release | Manila

Today, more than 480,000 doses of AstraZeneca vaccines arrived in the Philippines from the COVAX Facility, the international partnership established to ensure equitable distribution of COVID-19 vaccines around the world. 

The Philippines is among the first countries in Southeast Asia to receive vaccines from the COVAX Facility. COVAX is co-led by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), working in partnership with UNICEF as well as the World Bank, civil society organisations, manufacturers, and others.

"The long days and nights of waiting are finally over. These vaccines will be of great help to our valiant healthcare workers who have been at the forefront of the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic. With every dose that we will administer, we are inching towards a safer recovery from this pandemic. So, let us put our trust in science, in vaccines. Together, we will rise as a nation and heal as one,” says Department of Health Secretary Francisco T. Duque III.

Officials from the Philippines’ Inter-Agency Task Force on the Management of Emerging Infectious Diseases (IATF), Department of Health (DOH), World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF Philippines received the vaccine doses at the Ninoy Aquino International Airport. The Philippine Government will lead the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign.

The COVAX Facility leads an unprecedented effort to provide at least 2 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines by the end of 2021 to low- and middle-income countries. For several months, COVAX partners have been supporting governments and partners in readiness efforts, in preparation for this moment. This includes assisting with the development of national vaccination plans, support for cold chain infrastructure, as well as stockpiling of half a billion syringes and safety boxes for their disposal, masks, gloves and other equipment to ensure that there is enough equipment for health workers to start vaccinating priority groups as soon as possible.

The WHO launched the Access to COVID-19 Tools (ACT) Accelerator, a global collaboration to accelerate development, production, and equitable access to COVID-19 diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. COVAX is the vaccines pillar of the ACT Accelerator and is led jointly by Gavi, WHO, the CEPI, and UNICEF, which is leading vaccine procurement and delivery operations. WHO is tasked with ensuring fair allocation and prioritization of countries eligible to receive vaccines from the COVAX Facility.

“WHO joins partners and the people of the Philippines in welcoming the arrival of COVID-19 vaccines through the COVAX Facility. These vaccines coming through COVAX will help protect up to 20% of the population in the country during this year, including healthcare workers, other frontline workers and the elderly – groups who are most at risk. The COVID-19 vaccines are proven to protect people from severe disease and death. Used together with public health measures currently in place – wearing masks, physical distancing, avoiding large groups, and washing hands frequently – will help mitigate the effects of the pandemic by reducing deaths and severe disease. We all welcome the addition of vaccines to the available tools in the country which, when used to scale, will contribute to gradual return of day-to-day activities and economic revival in the country. The delivery of COVID-19 vaccines in the Philippines is a powerful step in that direction,” said Dr. Rabindra Abeyasinghe, WHO Representative to the Philippines.

UNICEF is leading the procurement and delivery of COVID-19 vaccines through COVAX facility to countries - the biggest, most sophisticated ground operation in the history of immunization. In the Philippines, apart from supporting COVID-19 vaccine introduction and roll out, UNICEF continues to support the immunization programmes of the government through planning, cold chain and vaccine management, technical know-how and training. Building on over 70 years of experience in providing simple, effective and accurate information to build public knowledge, awareness and confidence in vaccines, UNICEF is working with partners to ensure that local communities are engaged in the overall vaccination process

“Vaccines are safe and effective. The COVID-19 pandemic has become a child rights crisis which we need to end as fast as possible. The longer the pandemic goes on, the more intense the impact on people, especially on children’s health, rights to education, nutrition, protection and mental health. COVID-19 vaccination should be part of a larger strategy to strengthen health systems for children and families in the Philippines for the long-term,” says UNICEF Philippines Representative Oyunsaikhan Dendevnorov.

The COVAX Facility aims to procure 2 billion doses by the end of 2021. The vaccines are intended to protect frontline health care and social workers, as well as high risk and vulnerable people. COVAX was set up to address concerns around fairness and making vaccines available to all. To control and end the global pandemic, vaccines must be available to all.

About COVAX

COVAX is co-led by CEPI, Gavi and WHO – working in partnership with UNICEF as key implementation partner, developed and developing country vaccine manufacturers, the World Bank, and others. It is the only global initiative that is working with governments and manufacturers to ensure COVID-19 vaccines are available worldwide to both higher-income and lower-income countries.

CEPI is leading on the COVAX vaccine research and development portfolio, and investing in R&D across a variety of promising candidates, with the goal to support development of three safe and effective vaccines which can be made available to countries participating in the COVAX Facility. As part of this work, CEPI has secured first right of refusal to potentially over one billion doses for the COVAX Facility to a number of candidates, and made strategic investments in vaccine manufacturing, which includes reserving capacity to manufacture doses of COVAX vaccines at a network of facilities, and securing glass vials to hold 2 billion doses of vaccine.

Gavi is leading on procurement and delivery for COVAX, coordinating the design and implementation of the COVAX Facility and the COVAX AMC and working with Alliance partners UNICEF and WHO, along with governments, to ensure country readiness and delivery. The COVAX Facility is the global pooled procurement mechanism for COVID-19 vaccines through which COVAX will ensure fair and equitable access to vaccines for all 190 participating economies, using an allocation framework formulated by WHO. The COVAX Facility will do this by pooling buying power from participating economies and providing volume guarantees across a range of promising vaccine candidates. The Gavi COVAX AMC is the financing mechanism that will support the participation of 92 low- and middle-income countries in the Facility, enabling access to donor-funded doses of safe and effective vaccines. UNICEF and the Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) will be acting as procurement coordinators for the COVAX Facility, helping deliver vaccines to all participants.

WHO has multiple roles within the COVAX: among other things it supports countries as they prepare to receive and administer vaccines and does so in partnership with UNICEF. It provides normative guidance on vaccine policy, regulation, safety, R&D, allocation, and country readiness and delivery. Its Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE) on Immunization develops evidence-based immunization policy recommendations. Its Emergency Use Listing (EUL)/prequalification programmes ensure harmonized review and authorization across member states. It provides global coordination and member state support on vaccine safety monitoring. It developed the target product profiles for COVID-19 vaccines and provides R&D technical coordination. Along with COVAX partners, it is developing a no-fault compensation scheme for indemnification and liability issues. COVAX is part of the Act accelerator which WHO launched with partners in 2020.

UNICEF is leveraging its experience as the largest single vaccine buyer in the world and working with manufacturers and partners on the procurement of COVID-19 vaccine doses, as well as freight, logistics and storage. UNICEF already procures more than 2 billion doses of vaccines annually for routine immunization and outbreak response on behalf of nearly 100 countries. In collaboration with the PAHO Revolving Fund, UNICEF is leading efforts to procure and supply doses of COVID-19 vaccines for COVAX. In addition, UNICEF and WHO are working with governments around the clock to ensure that countries are ready to receive the vaccines, with appropriate cold chain equipment in place and health workers trained to dispense them. UNICEF is also playing a lead role in efforts to foster trust in vaccines, delivering vaccine confidence communications and tracking and addressing misinformation around the world.

 

Germany suspends use of AstraZeneca’s Covid shot for the under-60s, dealing another blow to drugmaker

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/31/germany-suspends-use-of-astrazenecas-covid-shot-for-the-under-60s.html

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rfm010
16 hours ago, Dafey said:

As our resident Medical Member have you heard good or bad about the AZ vaccine? 

eek!  i'm not a medical doctor so i'm reluctant to say anything within that framework.

also, i haven't been keeping as up to date as usual as the wife is insisting that the kitchen cabinets, now that they have torn out, really need to be put back in.

however, from what i've heard and read so far, my opinion is that just as a numbers play i would not hesitate to take the az vaccine.  the optimistic view on the blot clot issue is that the numbers seem no different than what you would see even if there was no vaccination.  the pessimistic view is, well, shit-- blood clots after vaccination for a virus that can cause blood clots. 

so far i'm leaning toward the optimistic view with a bit of pessimism.  i really would like to see the hard data and that will take some searching.  and since none of the walls where the cabinets are going are plumb nor square, time is limited.  but i do want to find more on this germany business.

i recommend you take a listen to michael osterholm's podcast.  the march 23 podcast addressed the issue and osterholm was favoring the AZ vaccine.  and while listening you will see that he is generally pessimistic about the virus in general.  i see that he has a new podcast as of april 1, i'm going to listen to it as soon as i click on submit reply.  hopefully he will talk about it some more. 

haven't clicked submit yet.  realized that if i do i also probably need to get to work.  think i'll kick back and youtube some albert king-stevie ray vaughan clips first. 

https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/covid-19/podcasts-webinars

 

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fred42
On 4/1/2021 at 10:10 AM, liquido said:

Can you imagine a foreigner there standing in line to get vaccinated,I wonder how well that will go over with the natives..Is there even a protocol there for foreigners getting vaccinated?? 

I hope not!

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fred42
5 hours ago, Dafey said:

The local Barngay is setting up vaccines for it's workers. MIL is 70 and worried about the AZ vaccine as she has heard some adverse reactions to it, barticularly blood clots.

As our resident Medical Member have you heard good or bad about the AZ vaccine? 

I think there were 7 or 8 countries that suspended the AstraZeneca vaccine because of blood clot reports.

 

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rfm010

AZ not addressed in the april 1 osterholm podcast.  but it is an interesting podcast in terms of what is happening in the world, and in the u.s. in regard to the new variants (he says not good, young people much more susceptible now, we are all going to die)(ok, the last bit is mine).  he also has some interesting comments on the chinese source question.  will leave that for some other site of discussion.  so i went to the march 23 podcast, downloaded the transcript.  AZ is addressed at timestamp 29:42.  slight editing on my part on what follows:

question:   What should people make of all this news about the AstraZeneca vaccine?

answer:  (the relevant part):   Oh, my. You know, in a modern era of vaccinology with large pharmaceutical companies who are very experienced at dealing with the study of, the evaluation of, the approval of, the distribution of vaccines, it's hard to imagine a company, even as with their academic partner, Oxford, could stumble and commit as many unforced errors as they have done. Whether it was about the accidental dosing issue that occurred early in their studies, whether it's been the debates with the European Union and availability, whether it's been challenges to just how well the vaccine works. The issue, I think, with the blood clots was a very unfortunate one in that at this point, the data surely don't support a major problem with that. In fact, it likely reflects background, although we have to keep an open mind to that. And pharmacovigilance for the study of these vaccines is very, very important to make sure that if there is a signal there, we catch it. But as I've pointed out last week, and I'll point out again, we would expect to see in the United States on any one given day the number of people vaccinated, 10 to 20 of these individuals developing blood clots within the next two to three days after vaccination just by chance alone. It has nothing to do with the vaccine. So the challenge is, when is it possibly something really due to the vaccine above and beyond the background? So AstraZeneca got dragged into that. At this point, the EMA, the FDA of Europe, and the WHO have basically said, "Go ahead. The safety signals that we've seen and the challenges do not merit stopping using the vaccine."

end of quote.

the purple part at the bottom is important.  he is saying that by the numbers/data we have so far, the vaccine seems to not be a particular problem.  but he is also saying that the question, ultimately, hasn't been answered with finality.  really need to dig into the nitty gritty of the individual cases of blood clots to get a feel for what is going on.  but again, going by the numbers of what is proving to be a really big drug trial, the numbers supporting the safety of the AZ vaccine far outweigh the numbers supporting the risk of getting covid and developing serious problems from it.   that last sentence reads badly, i'll restate it.  the numbers indicate you are far far far more likely to have a problem from covid than you are from taking the AZ vaccine.   i will take the vaccine with no hesistation if given the chance. 

but i'd still like to get a better feel for what is going on in germany. 

and i'd still prefer novavax, although the new data for  pfizer biontech keeps looking better and better.

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rfm010

wife is in the kitchen eating lunch so it is safer upstairs on the computer, so i went to the osterholm podcast of march 18.  same idea about the blood clots, still a numbers game.  from timestamp 31:40:

"...Any time you see a health condition that occurs coincidental with a vaccine, you at least have to take a look and say, "Is this likely or is this possible that it could be associated with the vaccine itself?" So no one wants to miss or dismiss some kind of a health condition. But at the same time, we have to understand there are many, many health conditions that will occur coincidental to getting a vaccine. Let's take the situation right now that's happening with the AstraZeneca vaccine in Europe. This all began when there were four cases of blood clots in abnormal bleeding in four individuals in Norway. All were under 50 who received the vaccine. Of the four individuals, two of them died from brain hemorrhages and the other two were hospitalized. At that point, that created a great deal of news attention. And other countries in Europe started looking at this. As of today, there have been 19 countries that have decided to delay any further use of the AstraZeneca vaccine, despite the fact that the European Medical Authority, the FDA basically of the E.U., and the World Health Organization have said do not suspend the program at this time as there is no conclusive data that these are really related to the vaccines. If you hear that, you say, "Well, how can that be the case? You know, look at what's happening here." Well, let me just back up and give some context. If you look at the United States and the roughly three hundred and thirty million people we have, every year between three hundred thousand six hundred thousand people develop these similar blood clots, 60 to 100 thousand Americans go on and die annually from this type of thromboembolism. Looking at those numbers and extrapolating out to the fact that every day we're vaccinating now about two million people. Based on this estimate I just gave you, you could expect about one thousand to two thousand of these blood clots to occur in the US population every day. If you assume right now that the US has two hundred and fifty three million adults, so basically every day about 2.3 million or about one percent of the adult population is getting vaccinated. If you take one percent of that normal one thousand to two thousand daily blood clots, that's 10 to 20 a day that would occur on the day of your vaccination and occur the next day and the next day and the next day. So the challenge is, if you do have a risk of some adverse event like this blood clot, how would you know? Would you have to see a very sizable increase in the number of cases and the answer is yes, that's the challenge we have. So today what you're seeing happen is out of an abundance of caution, government officials are basically, in a sense, overruling the public health officials and saying we are going to stop the program because that's what is politically expedient in light of people not wanting to get blamed for having some problem occur. But at the same time, they are undermining dramatically vaccine confidence and people who are not getting vaccinated will not be protected. And the risk of dying from covid-19, even if there were some slight increased risk with this vaccine, is substantially higher from covid-19. So I am very sympathetic to the concerns of wanting to know is there some risk, increased risk specifically, with getting vaccinated and having these thromboembolisms. But at the same time, understanding that by not vaccinating, people are also put at high risk, particularly as in many cases in Europe we're seeing this B117 surge and people at risk. So I commend the EMA and the WHO for the rapid response. They're having meetings this week. I can only hope that some countries are going to reconsider quickly. I understand that that may be in the works right now for several other countries that they are going to reconsider their bans on the vaccine. And at this point, the British health officials have said very clearly in their extensive look see at this in their country, they have seen no evidence of increased risk. So stay tuned. But I feel quite confident, based on the information I've seen to date, is that this is not a cause and effect kind of event. And let me just remind everyone, I shared this with you before in previous podcasts in some months ago, if we were to vaccinate one million, 55 to 64 year olds today, one million, we would expect in the next week 170 of those individuals to die by whatever cause, all cause mortality. Just a straightforward actuarial table kind of a calculation. Imagine in the week after someone might have been vaccinated and they die. How many family members would immediately connect that vaccine with that death almost without regard to what caused it? That's the challenge we're up against right now. And we must do a much, much better job of trying to share the information with the public about how do we determine when there is an increased occurrence of an event associated with vaccination? And when is it just part of the routine events of life?..."

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