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Peabody Strange

I don't think the airline asks DFAT for any permissions nor do I see any evidence of a "queue".  The airlines are told how many passengers per week they are allowed and then it's up to them to deal with it.  The DFAT registration prior to flight seems to be solely for data collection purposes.

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Let's see....A $100 a night to the hotel and $100 to the politicians for assigning the dive as a quarantine hotel. Bet the politicians never ate a meal there nor spent a night. Always good money to be

Includes basic 3 meals a day, no choice of menu, e.g. Breakfast is cereal and milk.  Lunch is a sandwhich.  Dinner I suppose varies, but last night it was 2 tired looking sausages with some watery mas

ADDENDUM: Finally arrived in Cairns but was picked by customs for a thorough reaming. i.e. Every bag opened, laptops and phones content examined, the full 9 yards.  Everything passed except my ni

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Dafey
27 minutes ago, Peabody Strange said:

I don't think the airline asks DFAT for any permissions nor do I see any evidence of a "queue".  The airlines are told how many passengers per week they are allowed and then it's up to them to deal with it.  The DFAT registration prior to flight seems to be solely for data collection purposes.

Go for it!

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cookie47
14 minutes ago, mikewright said:

 

Cookie, I think this is the Australian Travel Declaration you mentioned. Seems you must open an account and submit the form at least 72 hours prior to flying out, and you then receive an email which you may have to show before being allowed to board the flight. And if you get bumped from your flight, for any reason, you have to lodge another declaration with new flight details.

https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/australia-travel-declaration

 

Yes that's the way I see it also. I think what's been misunderstood "and" I'm not saying anyone in particular is that,The way that the Smart Traveller website is worded a person with Australian Citizen ship will be approved for arrival by DFAT without question, I don't think that's the case as we know that many Australians are still stuck overseas..

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Peabody Strange
5 minutes ago, cookie47 said:

Yes that's the way I see it also. I think what's been misunderstood "and" I'm not saying anyone in particular is that,The way that the Smart Traveller website is worded a person with Australian Citizen ship will be approved for arrival by DFAT without question, I don't think that's the case as we know that many Australians are still stuck overseas..

I see no evidence that DFAT is approving or not approving anyone.  On the contrary, smarttraveller suggests no such approval is needed.  I haven't applied for any permission to return nor am I in any queue.  I am however one of the many Aussies stuck overseas because airlines keep cancelling flights.  I was booked business class philippine airlines flight but that was cancelled (a month before the flight, so I hadn't even done a DFAT travel declaration).  I don't think DFAT is giving permissions to return.  They tell the airlines their quota and it's up the airlines how they deal with it.

Anyway it will probably be a moot point as I very likely won't get all the bits of philippines paper done in time.  I will do as I am told but I am relying on Philippines bureaucracy to do as they say they will do in within the time limits they say they will meet.

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mikewright
21 minutes ago, Peabody Strange said:

I see no evidence that DFAT is approving or not approving anyone.  On the contrary, smarttraveller suggests no such approval is needed.

That's correct, the DFAT Register seems to be mainly for data collection to give the government an idea of the number of Australians overseas who want to return home but can't, for one reason or another. Supposedly to help the government with its planning.

The Australian Travel Declaration is required by the Dept of Home Affairs, not DFAT, and is completed after you have your trip information, and at least 72 hours before your flight. "If you do not complete the declaration you may not be able to board your flight, or you may experience delays when you arrive in Australia."  Let us know how you go with this. Good luck!

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cookie47
2 hours ago, Peabody Strange said:
2 hours ago, cookie47 said:

Yes that's the way I see it also. I think what's been misunderstood "and" I'm not saying anyone in particular is that,The way that the Smart Traveller website is worded a person with Australian Citizen ship will be approved for arrival by DFAT without question, I don't think that's the case as we know that many Australians are still stuck overseas..

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I see no evidence that DFAT is approving or not approving anyone. 

Yes you're correct. (And agree that is what the Government Smart Traveller site clearly says).... The government sets the cap per day /week on arrival and the airlines have to implement it. And of course it's pot luck if you make the flight without cancellation. ...Also agree the required form looks like a data collection method for arrival logistics.

I think my inaccuracies were formed over Reading many many articles over the last 12 months (nothing better to do) and assumed ?  that Australian citizens stuck overseas were victims of a government policy saying you can't come back rather than a "combination" of lack of flights and quarantine Caps....And thus my use of the word permission was flawed...

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Soupeod

https://www.msn.com/en-xl/news/other/tennis-stars-arrival-angers-stranded-australians/ar-BB1cNaPK

Tennis stars' arrival angers stranded Australians

The sight of some of the world's biggest tennis stars touching down for the upcoming Australian Open tournament has frustrated many Australians unable to return home due to the pandemic.

Australia currently has a cap on the number of international arrivals, with people having to undergo quarantine in a designated facility.

There are roughly 37,000 Australians waiting to return, ABC news reports.

A number of airlines have suspended routes making it harder to travel back.

On Friday, Emirates airline announced it would be stopping its flights to Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane.

Organisers of the Australian Open put on chartered flights for the players and other members of staff.

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Players had to test negative before boarding flights and were then placed in quarantine hotels in Melbourne and Adelaide. 

The Australians who are trapped in the UK

'Crushed' on Melbourne's path to Covid success

Their arrival, while so many Australians are still trying to return home, has drawn criticism. 

"I can't comprehend the fact that one week they announce they're halving the caps for citizens and the following week they announce they've found 1,200 spaces for tennis players and support staff," Sarah, a key worker who lives in London but is from Sydney, told the BBC.

She has been trying to return to Sydney since October and her most recent flight was cancelled. 

"All I want to do is return home. I've had to watch my sister's wedding on Zoom. My flight was timed so I get out of quarantine in time for her baby shower but it looks like I'll miss this and the birth". 

People have taken to Twitter using the hashtag #strandedaussies to share their stories. 

One person wrote: "We've delayed F1, why not the Australian Open? Is it really worth the risk of introducing Covid-19 for entertainment's sake? So many Australians stranded overseas, bringing them home would do more good for morale than a fortnight of tennis."

Another user said: "Thousands of Australian citizens are still stranded overseas. I've been a huge tennis fan for close to 40 years, but this is just wrong. I will not be supporting this Australian summer of tennis."

What are the rules in Australia?

Australia has strict limits on the number of arrivals allowed to enter the country. Authorities say this is to ensure there is enough room in a government quarantine facility. 

Unlike other countries, those arriving in Australia must quarantine in a designated facility or hotel instead of their own homes. 

The cap on people entering was cut further last week after a hotel worker in Queensland contracted the UK variant of the coronavirus. 

Until 15 February, New South Wales will have a weekly cap of 1,505 arrivals, Western Australia will permit 512 people and Queensland will have a cap of 500.

Victoria and South Australia have kept their caps the same. Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the Australian Capital Territory and Northern Territories had their own "bespoke arrangements" for those arriving. 

© EPAMore than 1,200 people have been brought to Australia for the tennis tournament

The Australian government has operated a number of repatriation flights but demand has been high. 

Last month, in an interview on Australian network Seven, Mr Morrison said Australians overseas were his "first priority in terms of people coming back into the country". 

"We want you to come home and you have every right to come home," he said.

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Peabody Strange

Emirates cancelling all their Australian flights is good news for anyone booked to fly to Australia as long as they ain't booked on an emirates flight.  (Obviously)  The cap allocated to emirates is being distributed to the other airlines, so should be less chance of getting cancelled.

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BossHog

Australia has announced twenty upcoming repatriation fights for its citizens. No indication yet which countries will be involved but they did fly repatrition flights outta d'Phils last year so might be a chance again.

Stranded Australians get 20 new repatriation flights after Emirates pulls out of Australia

The federal government will arrange for a further 20 international repatriation flights to bring stranded Australians home, following a decision by Emirates to suspend all flights to and from Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane.

The announcement follows the national cabinet's decision to significantly reduce the cap on international arrivals via commercial flights by 50 per cent until mid-February, following concerns that the hotel quarantine system will be challenged by the more virulent British strain of the coronavirus.

Speaking to reporters on Saturday, Finance Minister Simon Birmingham said 446,000 Australians had been able to return home since March 2020 and the federal government had organised 90 flights to assist.

Senator Birmingham acknowledged the border restrictions put in place early last year had made it difficult for many people and said the additional 20 flights over the next couple of months would help.

"These flights will fly from priority areas from around the world, making sure that the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade off of their intelligence and knowledge of where Australians most need assistance, target those flights," he said.

The passengers will be in addition to the caps on commercial flight passengers.

The additional arrivals will be directed to the Howard Springs quarantine facility in the Northern Territory, Canberra and Tasmania and would happen according to strict protocols to keep Australia safe.

Senator Birmingham defended the severe restrictions on international arrivals put in place since last year, saying the measures had helped Australia contain the spread of COVID-19.

With nearly 40,000 Australians stuck overseas nearly a year after the pandemic started, Senator Birmingham acknowledged people's frustrations but said the travel restrictions had been an "essential" part of Australia's COVID-19 success.

"The very first steps taken almost exactly 12 months ago to start closing Australia's borders, to put in place restrictions to keep Australians safe have worked and have been a triumph for Australia relative to so much of the rest of the world," he said.

"Australians are enjoying relative freedoms, relative openness and, of course, health successes that are the envy of the rest of the world."

Labor has criticized the federal government's approach to hotel quarantine, with opposition foreign affairs spokeswoman Penny Wong saying "Scott Morrison has refused to take responsibility for quarantine" and urging the government to establish a national system.

Responding to the criticism, Senator Birmingham questioned where the quarantine facilities would be established and where the "magical workforce" would be found.

He said the federal government had supported state governments' hotel quarantine systems with Defence Force personnel.

He also noted that some of the Australians registering their desire to come home had done so in recent months, not in the early stages of the pandemic.

After Emirates suspended its flights to Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, Senator Birmingham noted other carriers were still servicing Australia and they could fill the capacity available under international arrival caps. Senator Birmingham said the repatriation flights facilitated by the government would be done in a safe way to keep Australia safe and open.

The United Arab Emirates carrier was conducting daily flights between Dubai and Sydney and Melbourne and five flights a week to Brisbane, meaning the decision will wipe out 19 flights per week for Australians in Europe and the Middle East who have been waiting months to get home.

The airline only flies Airbus A380s and Boeing 777s – two of the largest modern planes in the industry.

Responding to the decision by Emirates to suspend flights to and from Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, Senator Birmingham said it was a commercial decision by the airline and the places under the arrivals cap would be available to other carriers.

Qatar Airways, Etihad Airways, Singapore Airlines and Japan Airlines are still running flights to Australia for people in Europe but the cap reduction has already led to some cancellations and delays.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/stranded-australians-get-20-new-repatriation-flights-after-emirates-pulls-out-of-australia-20210116-p56ulv.html

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Peabody Strange

UPDATE:

Medical Clearance I got yesterday.  In typical Philppines fashion, something simple and straightforward became complicated and time consuming.  The actual medical stuff (blood, piss and xray) was done early and easily.  The rest of the day was spent dealing with tiresome and stupid layers of officialdom before being permitted to receive the results.  Pics of the clearance along with the barangay certificate and flight details were then uploaded to the pnp facebook account as per their instructions.  Then of course they wanted all the same information typed and sent so they could copy and paste it.  Ok done that and shortly thereafter, was able to download the official "Covid Shield" Travel Authority.  Hooray.

This morning I did the rt-pcr covid test.  The last remaining requirement for entry into Australia.  The requirements are that the result must include name, date and time of test and type of test.  At every opportunity I asked if the test would include these details and if it would be ready tomorrow and in each case I was assured affirmatively.  But no they didn't have a sample result to show me.  Now I can only wait and hope the assurances I was given turn out to be true.  If so, then there should not be any further hindrance to my returning to Australia.

According to Air Niugini, their flights to Cairns are uncapped.  So much less likely to be bumped or cancelled.  So if any other aussies are desperate to get home, try going to Cairns.  Yeah I know it's nowhere anybody wants to be, but after the compulsory 2 weeks imprisonment, you are free to make your home back to where ever you call home.

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Peabody Strange

UPDATE:

Received emailed Covid test result this morning at 7.13am (test taken yesterday 7.30am).  Everything in order, all papers complete, ready for departure tomorrow morning on CebuPac to Manila, and from there to Cairns.  Big relief to have the numerous bits of paper done.

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liquido
33 minutes ago, Peabody Strange said:

UPDATE:

Received emailed Covid test result this morning at 7.13am (test taken yesterday 7.30am).  Everything in order, all papers complete, ready for departure tomorrow morning on CebuPac to Manila, and from there to Cairns.  Big relief to have the numerous bits of paper done.

Safe trip to you sir.....

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Peabody Strange

I'm sitting here in NAIA bored as sh*t waiting out the 8 hours between my domestic arrival and international departure.  Thought I might do another update.

Never transited through Manila before but I understood there was a free shuttle bus to take me from T3 to T1.  Apparently not based on what the security guard told me.  He insisted only taxis.  So I went to get a taxi and was told they are fixed rate 600 pesos to take me from one side of the airport to the other.  I balked at this and was pointed towards the metered cabs (yellow) and the trip cost me 170 php.  Which was a lot more reasonable!

Everything has gone smoothly so far, all the bits of paper readily scanned and accepted.  Incidentally, about getting the Health clearance... Did the blood piss and xray early and was told the results would be ready about 5 hours later.  And to pick it up only required the receipt and no I didn't need to do personally, my lady friend could do it without me.  Great!  However as it turned out...

My gal went to pick it up and was told by the server she needed to bring the barangay clearance before they would give it to her.  Grrrrr ok well tricycle back home, grab the barangay clearance and back to city health.  She showed them the paper and the server wrote down my age, birthday, name, country Im going to etc.  She then told my gal she needs to examined by a doctor "Huh??"  Turns out the server assumed she was the one travelling.  Which is an incredible assumption to make given that my slim but amply breasted gal does not look in any way close to being 58.   Nor have I met any female with a name like mine (common male name).  The server insisted I had to be the one to pick up the result personally and I needed to be examined by another doctor. My gal told me she felt like her head was going to explode.  But not choice but to tricycle back home and pick me up this time and so back to city health.  As it turns out, the server was on a break or something and we were dealt with by a different server, who simply took the receipt and gave us the result without asking any questions or wanting to see anything else.  Done and dusted in 30 seconds.

Incidentally, my gal got her 15 minutes of fame yesterday, appearing on the front page of the Davao SunStar for her tiktok-ing thing.  If you happen to see it, tell me how old you think she is and I guarantee it it won't be anywhere near close to 58!!!

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crazygolfer
7 hours ago, Peabody Strange said:

Never transited through Manila before but I understood there was a free shuttle bus to take me from T3 to T1. 

Last time I made the trip to Cebu via Manila i used a free shuttle and I have also used a minivan that charged 60 (?) peso /suitcase.

 

Regarding your gal, she wearing a black blouse? 35yo? Goodlooking!

You are in Oz now?  .... checking for tickets to Davao...  

 

Joke.

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Peabody Strange

ADDENDUM:

Finally arrived in Cairns but was picked by customs for a thorough reaming. i.e. Every bag opened, laptops and phones content examined, the full 9 yards.  Everything passed except my nicotine vaping juice which I had actually imported a couple of years ago while in Australia.  Apparently the rules are that from January 1st this year, a doctors prescription is required to import it.  I protested that the official public pronouncements from the government were that these regulations were rescinded and a prescription would only be required starting in October this year.  Apparently, the government announced it, but never got around to the boring tedious bit of actually updating the regulations to reflect the new policy.  So far as customs is concerned the penultimate policy is still in effect.

Took them 2 hours to come to this conclusion but ultimately decided to let me keep the stuff this time.  I wasn't the only one waiting for 2 hours.  Every other person on the plane was waiting in a bus outside for me to come out and then to be taken to the compulsory 2 week quarantine hotel.  I felt sorry for them but I didn't feel guilty cos the fault was entirely that of the government and it's arms of bureaucracy.

So any aussies reading this, who prefer to take their nicotine in a much safer way than burning tobacco leaves, be aware the current policy is that only the cancer causing leaf burning nicotine delivery system is allowed without a prescription.

The older I get, the more I think Guy Fawkes had the right idea.

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