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Public School Classes 2020


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BossHog

There's talk in the national media about distance learning, synchronous and asynchronous learning, and modules etc. Where we live public school just never started at all. Well, about half the students enrolled back in the summer but nothing has been heard from the teachers or the DepEd since then. 

All kids from elementary to high school just sort of wander around town or play with their phones. Or do manual labor. Or get pregnant.There are no classes or assignments or modules of any description.

My kids are older but we do have a twelve-year old nephew who came to live with us. He normally lives on a small outlying island with no cell or Internet signal but they had a teacher who visited the island three days a week. That obviously got canceled so we had him come here and enroll in the local school. But like I said, nothing at all has happened and it's not so long until first semester is over.

Curious what people in other areas of the Philippines are experiencing as to public school learning right now. My nephew is real helpful and feeds all our animals and waters the wife's orchids everyday but he's a bright kid and would sort of like to have classes eventually. In fact all my dozens of nieces and nephews are bored silly; there's just no school.

Edited by BossHog
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In southern Masbate, the kids are doing the modules at home. The teachers show up at the school on some kind of modified schedule. One brother-in-law is a principal, one is a teacher, as well as a sister-in-law, and they all are having to report in at the school. They asked around for donations to get the paper and ink to print out all these modules; heard they burnt up a few printers as well with all the printing!

But at least there is a school...I don't think it's good for kids not having school for extended periods; just my 2 cents worth.

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Dafey

Kids here get a module on a thumb drive every week and plug it into their phone/TV/computer if they have one. The lessons are designed by the DepEd and aren't bad but it's nothing like real school. Also, the Mom's have to play teacher for this and they are ill prepared.

The thing is...public school here in the province teaches them skills to survive in the province. It doesn't prepare them for further education. The farthest most of them go is to Cebu to dance in Sinulog as that is about half of the curriculum.

In my eyes, it's a year. No biggie. Instead of class of 2021 they will be class of 2022.

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HongKongPhooey
1 hour ago, Dafey said:

In my eyes, it's a year. No biggie. Instead of class of 2021 they will be class of 2022.

Human brains keep developing until the mid 20’s. That’s not only in terms of knowledge and learning but biologically = synaptic connections. 
 

A 15 year-old kid will probably be alright skipping a year, but below that, one year is huge. The neural connections may not remain activated and be pruned. Basically - Don’t use it, they lose it. 

People are underestimating the damage this is doing to these kids intellectually, socially and physically.

30 years from now, or maybe sooner, they will judge us for how selfish we were.

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HongKongPhooey
On 11/2/2020 at 8:21 AM, HongKongPhooey said:

Human brains keep developing until the mid 20’s. That’s not only in terms of knowledge and learning but biologically = synaptic connections. 
 

A 15 year-old kid will probably be alright skipping a year, but below that, one year is huge. The neural connections may not remain activated and be pruned. Basically - Don’t use it, they lose it. 

People are underestimating the damage this is doing to these kids intellectually, socially and physically.

30 years from now, or maybe sooner, they will judge us for how selfish we were.

In Davao they are doing some weird hybrid, online/offline/pickup books when you can thing.  Bought the niece and nephew a tablet, well, because it seems they need one (what are the other kids doing) - fine with me. 

I really feal terrible for them.

 

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to_dave007

In Tuburan parents must go to the school every 2 weeks to pick up printed modules (and deliver completed modules).  Lots of paper.  Latest estimate for my oldest son in grade 4 is:

  • 4 Quarters in the school year.
  • 9 courses
  • 8 modules per quarter per course except mathematics which is 16 modules per quarter.  So 16 + (8 x 8) = 80 modules per quarter or 320 modules for the whole year
  • Boys can complete 2 to 3 modules a day if they have "help"

The boys started back a bit slow after being out of school from mid March to Oct 5..  about 6 to 7 months.  But their mother (an unemployed licensed teacher herself) and I stayed on top of it and so far its going ok.  I help them with Math, Science and English, and wife helps them with the other subjects.  Boys are getting in the mood and moving more and more on their own now.  Many (likely even MOST) students will not be so lucky.  I know that my wife's nephew is enrolled in Grade 4.  but he spends his days wandering around. and I'll be surprised if h's completed ANY modules.

The modules seem to be of a decent quality. I THINK they are prepared by DepEd central  here in Region VII, and they are certainly better then they would be if the teachers here in town did them.   I think DepEd is struggling to prepare these modules and stay ahead of the need, as it looks like they are being released to the schools weekly. The teachers and the schools are really STRUGGLING under the weight of the work to FUND and PRODUCE all this paper, and multiple local stakeholders are stepping up to help fund the supplies. I'm told they are trying to get commercial printers involved to take the load off the teachers and the inkjet printers (I kid you not..  sigh).  It's a massive job..  poorly planned and executed..  by very VERY well intentioned and hard working people. They will need help to get through it.  It appears the local community is starting to get behind the schools to get it done.  I'm going in to see principal at my sons school today for just that reason.

I have no doubt that my sons will not get all they SHOULD get from Grade 4 (the 9 year old) and Grade 3 (the 8 year old), and I'm sure they will lose a little ground from where they SHOULD be at this age.  BUT..  they are young and bright and I'm sure they will catch up once this COVID crap is past.  In the meantime my own objective is to help them get CREDIT form Grade 4 and 3..  to avoid tacking on an extra year in their late teens.. and to help them make the best of a bad situation. 

2020 won't be a complete loss.  My German friend has been teaching them how to play piano over the past 6 months sons, and they are starting to prepare now for their 'Christmas concert".  We are asking just 10 minutes from each of them.  And they learned how to skip rope like a boxer, use stilts, use a dictionary, a thesaurus and Google and Wikipedia, and have started to learn how to to type.  And they raised 4 chickens (started with 5), the first of which THEY will send to the kitchen table in another few weeks (with a bit of help).  And they made the cage the chickens started in.. themselves (again.. with a bit of help.. but mostly them).

If life gives you lemons..  make lemonade.

Edited by to_dave007
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BossHog

Well, my 12 y/o nephew finally got his modules delivered yesterday. All of them. The entire semester's worth.

They are due today. Yes, he got less than 24 hours to do a semester's worth of schoolwork. My own kid who is now a university freshman spent all of yesterday evening, last night, and early this morning helping him complete it all. Not sure how much he absorbed or will retain though but between the two of them they got it done.

What a farce.

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to_dave007
29 minutes ago, BossHog said:

Well, my 12 y/o nephew finally got his modules delivered yesterday. All of them. The entire semester's worth.

They are due today. Yes, he got less than 24 hours to do a semester's worth of schoolwork. My own kid who is now a university freshman spent all of yesterday evening, last night, and early this morning helping him complete it all. Not sure how much he absorbed or will retain though but between the two of them they got it done.

They've done quite a bit better here..  The modules were delivered in bi-weekly batches throughout the quarter, and the boys did a pretty decent job of getting them done by the bi-weekly deadline. We are left with about 5 modules each that we received last week for the quarter just ended that need to be delivered when school resumes.  Was quite a struggle for the boys..  and the teachers..  but it got done.

Total number of modules for the quarter:

  • Grade 3 - 40 modules total in 11 courses
  • Grade 4 - 72 modules total in 12 courses

is it ideal way to learn?  NOT by a long shot.  However..  these are the cards we are dealt..  and at 9 and 8 the boys will have lots of time to catch up anything they've missed when the virus is over.  In other ways they benefited from the close assistance their mother and I gave through the quarter.

Their cousin..  also 9..  to my knowledge.. did none of his modules.

Edited by to_dave007
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RogerDuMond

My two nieces are in a private Catholic school and do online classes with their teachers from 7:20 AM to 4:30 PM Mondays through Friday with 2 twenty minute breaks and one hour for lunch. If a student doesn't have internet connection they can get the classes on flash drive, or by printed module. They are doing well, still in the low 90s, but the failure rate in their classes has increased. Their classes that usually begin in June started in August and has been accelerated. They are taking their final exams for the first semester later this week.

I don't think that it his hurt them, except that they are missing the socializing. I do see where it would be a problem if they did the classes by module or flash drive as they wouldn't be able to ask questions if they don't understand something.

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17 minutes ago, RogerDuMond said:

I do see where it would be a problem if they did the classes by module or flash drive as they wouldn't be able to ask questions if they don't understand something.

Running into that with the kids in Bohol regarding their math problems when they ask me questions . I sometimes have problems with the syntax and explanation of the process to solve the problems. Not the problem, how it's presented.

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RogerDuMond

I think that in many cases, the modular schooling is a waste of time. My son's girlfriend's boy is doing the modular learning in the local public school and he is lost.

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Dafey
33 minutes ago, RogerDuMond said:

My son's girlfriend's boy is doing the modular learning in the local public school and he is lost.

Our nephews and nieces are doing fine with the modular learning however, the key is the mom/surrogate teacher. If they don't know the work it is tough on the kid as they have nobody to turn to for questions. As Moe stated, the way we learned it is probably not the same and you have to teach it to the kids the way the system wants it taught. So, even the parents might not understand as its probably been a few years since they learned and teaching techniques have changed. 

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On 12/15/2020 at 5:33 PM, BossHog said:

...My own kid who is now a university freshman spent all of yesterday evening, last night, and early this morning helping him complete it all. Not sure how much he absorbed or will retain though but between the two of them they got it done...

Let us know what kind of grade she gets for it.  

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