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My attic is too hot, how to....?


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Irenicus
On 9/27/2020 at 5:55 PM, to_dave007 said:

Your solution may not be entirely in your attic.  Some well placed trees may help.

Yup.  Plant some mansanitas trees to provide shade to the yard/house.  They grow crazy fast (one year) and give a whole lot of shade.  

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Looks like you have the first item taken care of -- a white roof.   Your vents under the overhang are not enough.  Google soffit vent for ideas that may apply to you.   Looks like putting in

We just cut long strips of plywood and tacked them up to hold the sheet in place, The side ones over lap so you can just slide the new sheet underneath before fixing. Just like putting up wallpaper. F

Tree shade is good but keep the branches off the house or you'll be inviting the ants in.   If you can find biriba trees to plant that's my personal favorite.  Quick growth with a nice mix of ver

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Irenicus
On 9/28/2020 at 12:41 AM, Headshot said:

If you don't want to do that, then your best option is probably to install fiberglass insulation just above the ceiling in your house.

Installing that cheap polystyrene insulation just above the ceiling with the radiant barrier facing up towards the roof made a dramatic temperature difference in our house.

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lamoe

Try this tonight, take a fan, place directly against an open window (hopefully screened - if not gonna get a lot of bugs ) in bedroom.  Tonight getting down to 24C (75F)  defiantly cool when accelerated by a fan.

I made mistake of putting fan outside (2nd floor BR) - got lots of tiny bugs blown in through screen.

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noddle
5 hours ago, Irenicus said:

Installing that cheap polystyrene insulation just above the ceiling with the radiant barrier facing up towards the roof made a dramatic temperature difference in our house.

From my research this it the way to go.. ( radiant barrier )

http://rimainternational.org/technical/library/radiant-barriers/

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rfm010
16 hours ago, Irenicus said:

Yup.  Plant some mansanitas trees to provide shade to the yard/house.  They grow crazy fast (one year) and give a whole lot of shade.  

Tree shade is good but keep the branches off the house or you'll be inviting the ants in.  

If you can find biriba trees to plant that's my personal favorite.  Quick growth with a nice mix of vertical and horizontal spread for the crown.  Can stand on the roof to top the tree and use a bamboo pole to  pick the fruit which is one of my favorites.  Hard to find the tree though, people dont know it.  Fruit bats know it and love it, fun to watch.   Dont plant mango, they get too big and draw lots of ants.  The sap falls all over the place and is sticky and is like poison ivy.  You dont want that on your roof or car or patio etc

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hyaku
On 9/28/2020 at 4:19 PM, trthebees said:

I've tried hunting back through the forum as there's good information from when this topic has been discussed before. However...going off topic!...it's a bit cranky cos I only seem to get my posts from the last year so can't find anything that way, , And using the search function, each time I go from the first page of the results to the next it tells me to wait before attempting another search, which is rather odd. I'm sure someone more up on these things can tell me what I'm doing wrong.

Anyway, back to topic. There was a fair bit of discussion about the positioning of the insulation, and favour for the idea that an air gap between the insulation and the surface, ceiling or roof sheets, is beneficial. The idea that insulation is laid on the ceiling or direct to the sheets could be that it's convenient. When we built our second house [first is native, very cool in both ways!] we laid a grid of tie wire over the ceiling beams and put the insulation on top of that. Second is rather similar to yours.

I think in your case I would consider creating a lattice of tie wire to support insulation against the underside of the roof rafters. Use a decent thickness to help self support and increase insulation effect, maybe foil both sides if available to keep cleaner. From previous discussions, this should work better having an air gap than being squashed under the roof sheets. And also, being squashed where the screws are makes the insulation ineffective, having no bubble thickness. It's also easy to retrofit and not too expensive.

Attics here are always rather warm, and there's good stuff above about ventilation. But this insulation should help. I know that when someone asks me to fix their light in a simple house with GI sheets, even at 8 in the morning touching the sheets is painful!

We just cut long strips of plywood and tacked them up to hold the sheet in place, The side ones over lap so you can just slide the new sheet underneath before fixing. Just like putting up wallpaper. First thing did after repainting was to push mesh frames on every window. All windows stay open 24/7 with exception to my "quiet room" unless there is an imminent tropical storm or typhoon. The other thing I found to be a big difference is white paint. All the walls are cold to the touch, even after a hot sunny day. 

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Ozbrum
On 9/28/2020 at 7:37 AM, cookie47 said:

This is the product that I was mentioning.Comes with adjustable rotating angled base so as to follow the roof line so ends up vertical.Not very cosmeticly appealing but does work in "most" circumstances79b2acbd5ea5ff4fb22fd2b2b166c231.jpg

Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk
 

this is the best solution now.....for your size roof two would be ideal , they can be fitted on the ridge.... ( high point ) after fitting you can consider increasing the venting in the eaves.... easily done by a competent handyman or carpenter.

good luck

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