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Soon to rise: New Cebu International Container Port in Consolacion


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Soon to rise: New Cebu International Container Port in Consolacion

Jerome Palomaria | September 26, 2020

The New Cebu International Container Port – one of President Duterte’s flagship projects under the Build, Build, Build Infrastructure Program – has commenced in Tayud, Consolacion, Cebu.

The New Cebu International Container Port (NCICP) is a ₱10.1-billion project that will cover 25 hectares of reclaimed land in the town of Consolacion.

₱8.8 billion of the total cost will come from a loan agreement between the Philippine Government and the Export-Import Bank of Korea which was signed in June 2018 and another ₱1.4 billion will be provided by the national government.

It has experienced delays mostly due to lacking clearances and the COVID-19 pandemic but it is set to commence upon completion of the consultancy work according to the head of the Cebu Port Authority.

New-Cebu-International-Container-Port.jpg

Long-term solution

The new Cebu International Container Port is seen as a long-term solution to the congestion problems of the current Cebu International Port (CIP). Upon completion of the project, the current CIP will be converted into a domestic port while the NCICP will cater to international cargoes coming in and out of Cebu.

Aside from decongesting the base port, it is also expected to improve the transport infrastructure system for the unimpeded flow of goods and services in the Visayas.

The new port will have a berthing facility with a 500-meter quay wall length that can simultaneously accommodate two 2,000 TEU (twenty-foot equivalent unit) vessels, operating facilities and structures for containers such as a freight station and inspection shed, an access road and bridge and a dredged waterway and turning basin, as stated in multiple news articles.

Timeline

June 2018: PH and South Korea’s Export-Import Bank signed an P8.8 billion loan agreement for the project. The Korean bank gave the national government until October 2018 to start the project.

February 2019: In an article, it was reported that DOTr had yet to secure clearances from the Philippine Reclamation Authority and the Department of Environment and Natural Resources.

January 2020: The Department of Transportation issued the notice of award for the consultancy services of the project to South Korea-based Yooshin Engineering Corporation.

August 2020: Cebu Port Authority (CPA) says new Cebu international container port could start this year.

CPA General Manager Leonilo Miole reported that consultancy works for the project were “currently ongoing”. If deadlines are met, then the construction of the project may start in a few months according to the head of Cebu Port 

https://sugbo.ph/2020/new-cebu-international-port/

 

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fivestarph

I could be wrong but one major problem I foresee, is that a substantial percentage of the International port containers are transhipped via Domestic ships to other ports in the Visayas. if these now will have to be transferred by road between the International and Domestic Ports there could be  servere road congestion at times.

 

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cookie47

Very good point.

Exactly what happened in Melbourne Australia.Port traffic eventually inundated local streets that wasn't designed for the level of traffic.Upgrades and a dedicated access road was mooted but have not been for a quite a few years. ?

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SkyMan

If they move enough port facilities north and south they can fill in the channel and then no more need for bridges.

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menehune

Yes they started already. Getting more trucks on the northen coastal road. But didnt fix the road and it was very damaged before all of this. More reasons i dont go into the city.

My friend told me about his friend bought property there cause they were getting aproval for the port and he was starting to bulid his wherehouse.

Edited by menehune
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cookie47
If they move enough port facilities north and south they can fill in the channel and then no more need for bridges.
Yeh, I've often thought of that.I mean looking around the world at some of the structures/development that exists.EG, Isn't the new Hong Kong Airport built on a man made island or part thereof.,,,,,Although I don't know about getting the fill material in PH.

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fivestarph

here's an artists impression of the new port

 

CPA Port.jpg

Edited by fivestarph
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HongKongPhooey

The Philippines is geographically perfectly situated to be the dominating import/export hub between East Asia and the Western Hemisphere. The only things holding it back are corruption, bureaucracy, government incompetence, people as the main export (brain drain), education, poverty, bad infrastructure, lack of rule of law, Muslim terrorists, communist insurgents and overpopulation.

Drawings of a port on an artificial island is a good start though.

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harry80020

Why would there be a need for a hub between East Asia and the Western Hemisphere, wouldn't it be better to ship direct? 

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RogerDuMond
8 hours ago, harry80020 said:

Why would there be a need for a hub between East Asia and the Western Hemisphere, wouldn't it be better to ship direct? 

I would think that shipping everything direct would increase the number of ships needed, decrease the size of shipments, increase shipping time waiting for full loads, and/or increase the cost of shipping.

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to_dave007
On 9/27/2020 at 7:20 AM, cookie47 said:

 I don't know about getting the fill material in PH.

I think the new Metro Cebu Expressway will generate a lot of fill once it's in full swing.

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Ozepete
11 hours ago, HongKongPhooey said:

The Philippines is geographically perfectly situated to be the dominating import/export hub between East Asia and the Western Hemisphere. The only things holding it back are corruption, bureaucracy, government incompetence, people as the main export (brain drain), education, poverty, bad infrastructure, lack of rule of law, Muslim terrorists, communist insurgents and overpopulation.

Drawings of a port on an artificial island is a good start though.

And when they get on top of these minor issues (Like NEVER) things will be on the up and up.   :cry:

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fivestarph
1 hour ago, RogerDuMond said:

I would think that shipping everything direct would increase the number of ships needed, decrease the size of shipments, increase shipping time waiting for full loads, and/or increase the cost of shipping.

The transhipment hubs for the Mega container ships ie those with a carrying capacity of 20,000 TEU+ in Asia are essentially Singapore and Hong Kong. Containers are then reloaded on smaller "feeder' ships around 2000 TEU capacity for on carriage to the Philippines as the vast majority of the mega container ships require a draft of  18m+/- which Philippine ports do not have.

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Headshot
10 hours ago, harry80020 said:

Why would there be a need for a hub between East Asia and the Western Hemisphere, wouldn't it be better to ship direct? 

Generally speaking, not everything on any given ship is going to the same final destination. Therefore, they transfer containers ship-to-ship at various ports to get containers to their final destinations. This sometimes involves some shore time between ships. Hence, the need for intermediate hub ports (where they sort containers by destination). If you ship by sea, you need to understand this.

Edited by Headshot
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fivestarph

For those interested in history this port was originally scheduled for completion in 2008.

Cebu port.jpg

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