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DeedleNuts

I got Moderna, seems fin)_($*)_(@#%$&%72 [CARRIER LOST]

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My wife feels the same way every time I try to have sex with her...

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hilyfe

I just had my first shot of that covid 19 vaccine

My arm is a bit sore

Nothing else

27th is my next shot

Of the Pfizer  vaccine 

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crazygolfer
On 4/2/2021 at 3:28 PM, rfm010 said:

well this is encouraging.   highlighting after the title is mine.  the comparison to the pfizer biontech vaccine is interesting, raising potential that the AZ clotting issue, while apparently exceedingly rare, is real.  if i was boss i would start examining a sample of people who have received the AZ vaccine and see if they have had, shall we call it, asymptomatic clotting events.  but i haven't been boss of anything in a long time, and even when i thought i was, i was just kidding myself.

 

 

Thanks for the info... BOSS :)

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RR3
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Russia's Sputnik V vaccine has 92% efficacy in trial

Russia's Sputnik V coronavirus vaccine gives around 92% protection against Covid-19, late stage trial results published in The Lancet reveal.

It has also been deemed to be safe - and offer complete protection against hospitalisation and death.

The vaccine was initially met with some controversy after being rolled out before the final trial data had been released.

But scientists said its benefit has now been demonstrated.

...

It uses a cold-type virus, engineered to be harmless, as a carrier to deliver a small fragment of the coronavirus to the body.

Safely exposing the body to part of the virus's genetic code in this way allows it to recognise the threat and learn to fight it off, without risking becoming ill.

After being vaccinated, the body starts to produce antibodies specially tailored to the coronavirus.

This means the immune system is primed to fight coronavirus when if it encounters it for real.

It can be stored at temperatures of between 2 and 8C degrees (a standard fridge is roughly 3-5C degrees) making it easier to transport and store.

Different second dose

But unlike other similar vaccines, the Sputnik jab uses two slightly different versions of the vaccine for the first and second dose - given 21 days apart.

They both target the coronavirus's distinctive "spike", but use different vectors - the neutralised virus that carries the spike to the body.

The idea is that using two different formulas boosts the immune system even more than using the same version twice - and may give longer-lasting protection.

As well as proving effective, it was also safe with no serious reactions linked to the vaccine during the trial.

Some side effects to a vaccine are expected but these are usually mild, including a sore arm, tiredness and a bit of a temperature.

And there were no deaths or serious illness in the vaccinated group linked to the jab.

...

In a comment published alongside the Lancet paper, Profs Ian Jones and Polly Roy said: "The development of the Sputnik V vaccine has been criticised for unseemly haste, corner cutting, and an absence of transparency.

"But the outcome reported here is clear and the scientific principle of vaccination is demonstrated, which means another vaccine can now join the fight to reduce the incidence of Covid-19".

They pointed out the vaccine had good effect in all age groups, and reduced the seriousness of the disease after one dose.

This was "particularly encouraging" while supply of the vaccine is limited, they added.

The authors of the Lancet paper pointed out the analysis only included symptomatic cases of Covid, and more work would need to be done to understand whether it stops even asymptomatic cases, and prevents the virus from being passed on by vaccinated people.

Dr Julian Tang, a clinical virologist at the University of Leicester, said: "Despite the earlier misgivings about the way this Russian Sputnik V vaccine was rolled out more widely - ahead of sufficient Phase 3 trial data - this approach has been justified to some extent now.

"Such pandemic-related vaccine rollout compromises have, to be fair, been adopted in the UK vaccination programme also - with the extended intervals between the first and second doses.

"So we should be more careful about being overly critical about other countries' vaccine designs."

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-55900622

Politics play role, BigPharma carving gold wont let others to share the loot, uses politicians, media. As always

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RR3
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Russian COVID vaccine: why more and more countries are turning to Sputnik V

When the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, announced on August 11 2020 that the country’s health regulator had become the first in the world to approve a COVID-19 vaccine for widespread use, the news was greeted with scepticism. No trials had been completed on the vaccine’s safety and efficacy.

While the initial reception of Sputnik V was critical, in February 2021, preliminary results of the phase 3 trials were reported with a 91.6% efficacy rate – the percentage reduction of disease in a vaccinated group of people compared to an unvaccinated group under trial conditions.

The scientific results were clear. A commentary published in the Lancet concluded: “Another vaccine can now join the fight to reduce the incidence of COVID-19.”

While Sputnik V’s impact is unlikely to rival that of Sputnik 1, the first ever satellite that triggered the space race, it is still a significant product at a time when vaccines are urgently needed.

Besides meaning “satellite” in Russian, Sputnik also means “travelling companion”. More and more countries are now deciding to travel out of the pandemic with Sputnik V as one of their vaccine choices.

...

Sputnik V has two key advantages that make its distribution easier: it is among the cheapest COVID-19 vaccines and it can be transported easily. At US$10 (£7) a dose – the same as Johnson & Johnson – Sputnik V is only beaten on cost by the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, which comes in at US$4 a dose. This means Sputnik V is more easily accessible for many countries struggling with the cost of vaccinating their population.

Like the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine, Sputnik V does not require specialised storage. Its liquid version can be stored at household freezer temperatures. A version that can be stored at fridge temperatures is under development and a powder version also exists.

The lower cost and reduced complexity of Sputnik V’s logistics, initially seen as ways to easily bring the vaccine to remote regions of Russia, is appealing to many outside the country as well.

Diversifying supply

Many vaccine supply chains are currently experiencing problems. Recently, Moderna halved a scheduled delivery to Canada citing production capacity issues . India, facing a spike in cases, is now using its vaccine production output mainly for the domestic market, stopping exports in March 2021. In the United States, 15 million doses of Johnson & Johnson had to be discarded after a factory error.

The Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine faces restrictions to certain age groups in many countries due to possible links with very rare blood clots. It is restricted to the over-30s in the UK and the over-50s in Australia. Norway has suspended the AstraZeneca rollout and delayed a final decision on its withdrawal, while the vaccine has been stopped entirely in Denmark.

At the same time, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is undergoing further testing also due to concerns about rare blood clots. All of this puts additional pressure on the Pfizer/BioNtech supply chain.

These issues have demonstrated the importance of working with a range of vaccine suppliers. Working with multiple suppliers is a standard supply chain practice. It lessens reliance on a single source and also enables customers to place orders based on higher demand than what can be met by only one supplier.

The European Commission has been negotiating intensely to build a diversified portfolio of vaccines for EU citizens at fair prices. Contracts have been concluded with six promising vaccine developers, securing a portfolio of more than 2.6 billion doses. There is widespread indecision about the adoption of Sputnik V within Europe, but Russia has an increasing presence in the vaccine market.

Complex decisions

Sputnik V is still under review by the European Medicines Agency. Globally, 57 countries have authorised its use, raising questions over when it will be available within the EU. At the moment, there are not enough doses of other vaccines available in the EU to satisfy demand, so the desire for new options is strong.

The EU often struggles to find a unified voice on Russia, with attitudes towards the country and historic relationships with it being very diverse across Europe. On the matter of Sputnik V, there are increasing calls for a cautious pragmatism. But this is a highly political matter. Slovakia’s prime minister, Igor Matović, formally resigned amid a political scandal triggered by a secret deal to buy doses of Sputnik V.

EU member states are allowed to strike separate deals with vaccine makers which have not signed agreements with the EU. Austria, Hungary and Slovakia have ordered Sputnik V but only Hungary has deployed it to date.

Hungary is the only European country to have deployed Sputnik V. Zoltan Balogh/EPA

The Czech Republic, Germany and Austria are trying to secure supplies of the vaccine, but have insisted it will only be used after the European Medicines Agency gives the go-ahead. As with other vaccines, any deliveries are unlikely to be immediate.

Global impact

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global challenge that requires global solutions. All countries that have developed and are producing vaccines are wielding considerable soft power. Debates over vaccine nationalism and vaccine diplomacy often overshadow the need for international cooperation.

As with other vaccines, production capacity for Sputnik V is being scaled up around the world, most recently in South Korea. Countries are producing it for their domestic markets as well as relying on imports from Russia. As production has so far been a major bottle neck for other vaccines, this adds much-needed capacity.

Health complications have been reported for several vaccines, affecting policies and public confidence. This will affect demand for vaccines that have no reported health complications so far, such as Pfizer/BioNtech, China’s Sinovac, or Sputnik V. Considerations of efficacy against variants, cost and availability will all be crucial, and a wider range of deployed vaccines can be very beneficial.

Considering all the available options is a sensible approach given the hiccups in vaccine risks, supply and approval delays that we’ve seen to date. Strategically considering a wide range of vaccine candidates is to be commended. Due diligence has to be done in all such considerations. Ultimately, transparency of this process will build public trust.

https://theconversation.com/russian-covid-vaccine-why-more-and-more-countries-are-turning-to-sputnik-v-159158

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mikecon3

The wife and I finished up our second dose of Pfizer on Monday. Other than a sore arm the next day, I didn't have any side effects from either shot, so far! The wife did experience body aches, chills and the headache from hell on Tuesday, but was fine by midday. We got them at Walgreens...there was a discussion in another thread about whether they took vitals...we just filled out a form, and took the shot, they didn't take blood pressure or anything else.

I just find it weird, I'm 300lbs with the hypertension that goes with it, and the wife is healthy and strong as an ox and never gets sick...and she's the one with the side effects!

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Dafey
1 hour ago, mikecon3 said:

The wife did experience body aches, chills and the headache from hell

My wife feels the same way every time I try to have sex with her...

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RR3

First EU cancels option to buy 300 million az jabs. Now EU asks states to back legal action against AstraZeneca :showing-ass:

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wondersailor
4 minutes ago, RR3 said:

First EU cancels option to buy 300 million az jabs. Now EU asks states to back legal action against AstraZeneca :showing-ass:

Don't know for sure but maybe the only way the EU can cancel this contract is to show some malfeasance by AZ. Am not a lawyer (heaven forbid!).

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rfm010

even brazil rejects sputnik, with pretty good reason, which if true is quite the muck up:

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/brazil-health-regulator-rejects-russia-s-sputnik-vaccine-1.5403539

"...Brazilian health regulator ... Anvisa's five-strong board voted unanimously not to approve the Russian vaccine after technical staff had highlighted "inherent risks" and "serious" defects, citing a lack of information guaranteeing its safety, quality and effectiveness.

...A crucial issue was the presence in the vaccine of the adenovirus that could reproduce, a "serious" defect,...". 

 

explanation: 

the adenovirus, of which there are several strains that cause common things like the common cold, is used as the delivery system for DNA vaccines (JnJ, AZ, sputnik).   after injection the adenovirus will enter your cell and start expressing viral proteins including the covid spike.  the covid spike is what you want so your immune system will see it and build a defense against it.  that way if you get a real covid infection your body's defense is ready to go. 

but what about the adenovirus itself?  why don't you get sick with that given that you've been injected with it?  to a certain extent you do and that is part of what the side effects are about.  however, adenovirus vaccines are treated in a couple of ways: 

first, a gene necessary for virus replication is deleted.  so the adenovirus can begin expressing proteins but then comes to a roadblock as the adenovirus itself fails to replicate.  

nextly, another gene which when present helps the adenovirus mess with your immune system (good for the adenovirus,  bad for you) is deleted (bad for the adenovirus, good for you).

so the adenovirus in the vaccine should have a couple of gene deletions.   it appears that the first deletion was not carried out, so the adenovirus is allowed to replicate.  this would cause you to get whatever ailment that particular adenovirus causes.   i don't see any indication about failure to delete the second gene.  perhaps wasn't tested, don't know. 

it has been mentioned that the sputnik vaccine actually uses two separate adenoviruses, one for each shot.  the first shot is the same as the JnJ vaccine,  adenovirus 26, the booster uses adenovirus 5.   sputnik 5.  clever.   apparently the failed deletion is in the booster. 

another possibility is deletion occurred but then the gene was able to recombine during manufacturing with a full length adenovirus 5 genome. 

this is pretty sloppy.  need information on whether there is a design flaw or a manufacturing flaw, if the latter how easy to monitor and fix.   quality control seems piss poor.  again google sputnik slovakia.  slovakia claims the sputnik they received is different from the sputnik described favorably in lancet.  the russians response is how dare you test our vaccine?  we sue.

adenovirus infections tend to be somewhat mild.  so maybe it won't be a big deal in terms of outcomes.  but it could cause severe side effects, rare or not.  who  knows?  one way to find out.  you first. 

lots to find out about but not looking good for sputnik.   just learned something or relearned, i forget.  the above gene deletions serve another purpose.  their deletion makes room for the addition of the covid spike protein.  if either or both of the gene deletions failed then quite possibly the covid spike gene addition failed.    so not only do you come down with a cold, but you don't get your immunity from covid.  cool.

 

 

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hilyfe
On 4/2/2021 at 10:59 PM, hilyfe said:

I just had my first shot of that covid 19 vaccine

My arm is a bit sore

Nothing else

27th is my next shot

Of the Pfizer  vaccine 

And all done

The second shot didnt feel anything

Not like the first shot

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SkyMan
On 4/22/2021 at 7:51 AM, Dafey said:

My wife feels the same way every time I try to have sex with her...

Maybe a padded headboard would help?

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RogerDuMond
On 3/11/2021 at 8:24 PM, SkyMan said:

As far I know you can still get it or give it so you still need to where a mask

Just released by the CDC in the U.S.

Quote

Fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear a face mask or stay 6 feet away from others in most settings, whether outdoors or indoors, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in updated public health guidance released Thursday.

There are a handful of instances where people will still need to wear masks — in a health-care setting or at a business that requires them — even if they’ve had their final vaccine dose two or more weeks ago, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky told reporters at a press briefing. Fully vaccinated people will also still need to wear masks on airplanes, buses, trains and other public transportation, she said.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/05/13/cdc-says-fully-vaccinated-people-dont-need-to-wear-face-masks-indoors-or-outdoors-in-most-settings.html

 

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SkyMan
7 hours ago, RogerDuMond said:

Just released by the CDC in the U.S.

 

As long as there are still situations where you have to wear a mask, they are still worried you can get it or spread it. 

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Salty Dog

50628.jpg

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