Jump to content

Philippines arrests former MP over wife's killing


softail

Recommended Posts

softail

A former Philippine congressman and religious cult leader was arrested Thursday over his wife's killing and corrupt practices, police said, ending a years-long manhunt.

Ruben Ecleo, 60, was head of a group called the Philippine Benevolent Missionaries Association when his wife's remains were found in a bin bag at the bottom of a ravine on the central island of Cebu in 2002.

He was arrested months later in a police raid on his home on the island of Dinagat, during which 17 people were killed.

Ecleo was bailed in 2004 and won a House of Representatives seat in 2010 -- held up as an example of an infamous culture of impunity in the country, where the rich and powerful are rarely held to account.

In 2012, a year after he stopped attending the trial, a Cebu court convicted him of parricide and sentenced him to 30 years in prison.

Manila police described Ecleo as the "#1 Top Most Wanted Person" in the Philippines.

A police report said he was arrested Thursday at a gated housing enclave in the northern city of Angeles, where he had been living under another name.

His driver was also detained for trying to obstruct Ecleo's arrest, police added.

In 2006, another court convicted Ecleo of corruption committed when he was a town mayor in Dinagat in the early 1990s.

Police said they used an arrest warrant issued over the graft case to detain Ecleo after a lengthy stake-out.

Ecleo became leader of his religious group, which claims millions of adherents, after the 1987 death of his namesake father, who had founded the group in 1965.

https://ph.yahoo.com/news/philippines-arrests-former-mp-over-wifes-killing-085230514.html

'He was arrested months later in a police raid on his home on the island of Dinagat, during which 17 people were killed. Ecleo was bailed in 2004 and won a House of Representatives seat in 2010"

How dose this happen?    

  • Like 1
Link to post
Kreole
2 hours ago, softail said:

He was arrested months later in a police raid on his home on the island of Dinagat, during which 17 people were killed. Ecleo was bailed in 2004 and won a House of Representatives seat in 2010

How dose this happen?    

How is Imelda Marcos not in prison?  Why can't the government find the majority of her ill-gotten fortune?  These questions are endless as outsiders, looking for "rational" reasons, try to make sense of politics in the Philippines.    Shameless corruption, tribalism and profound ignorance go a long way to explaining the phenomena.  Although my sympathies are always with the oppressed, sometimes I just become numb.  It is no different in other countries where lying, corrupt politicians keep getting re-elected.  The question always arises as to how so many people could continue to vote against their own interest?

  • Like 6
Link to post
Kreole

One of the things I find most humorous about Filipine politics is how often a congressman or political toady calls out another for corruption, just to have the accused reply with the same accusation, and to have them both correct, of course. 

What seems so outrageous in the RP is the severity of the crimes committed and "forgiven" as in the case of Ecleo.  A better case in point of course, points back to the Marcos family, primarily Imelda. 

In Malaysia, Najib Razak, the former president has been convicted and sentenced to 12 years in prison for embezzlement of billions of dollars.  It looks like the spotlight may turn on his wife who was complicit and spent a great deal of the money on frivolous things like shoes, jewelry, etc.   Sound familiar?   It will interesting to see how much of the stolen money can be recovered and if Najib's wife will be prosecuted.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Headshot

There is no such thing as a "former MP" (member of parliament) in the Philippines, since the Philippines doesn't have a parliament. The Philippines has a senate and a house of representatives, but no parliament.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Kreole
31 minutes ago, Headshot said:

There is no such thing as a "former MP" (member of parliament) in the Philippines, since the Philippines doesn't have a parliament. The Philippines has a senate and a house of representatives, but no parliament.

Thanks for the clarification.  The sad part is that whatever system is in place, in whatever country over the world, there are people like Ecleo and people who will support him/her (Hillary for example) no matter their crimes.  The shame these kinds of people bring to their country just doesn't stick because shamelessness is pervasive and everyone knows that all countries are subject to that, some more than others. 

That is why it becomes a joke when I read about one politician accusing another of corruption, when they themselves know they are as corrupt and criminal.  In a world driven by identity politics, to remain sane in this world of corruption you have to detach yourself emotionally and quit identifying with any tribe, party, religion or association.  You may find yourself very much alone or isolated, but at least you can maintain your self respect and dignity, with out which, you are just a zombie, an enabler.

  • Like 1
Link to post
MickyG
8 hours ago, Headshot said:

There is no such thing as a "former MP" (member of parliament) in the Philippines, since the Philippines doesn't have a parliament. The Philippines has a senate and a house of representatives, but no parliament.

https://manilastandard.net/mobile/article/326351

Quote

A touch of parliamentary governance

Most Filipinos interested in parliamentary democracy, whether as advocates or opponents, probably don't realize that they have, for some time now, been witnessing parliamentarism anew in the governance of this country. I say “anew” because the Philippines is no stranger to parliamentary democracy: the Malolos Congress established a parliament in 1898 and the 1973 Constitution provided for a parliament, which became the Batasang Pambansa.

The essence of the parliamentary system of government is, of course, the fusion of the Executive structure and the legislature into one body. There is no Executive Department and two legislative bodies; there is only the parliament. The parliamentary system is a Cabinet-run system. The Cabinet members are MPs (members of Parliament) and the Prime Minister is, among the Cabinet members, the primus inter pares.

Two high officials of the land have been giving Filipinos a fresh experience with parliament-type governance. They are President Rodrigo Duterte and Senator Christopher Go. Mr. Go is known by one and all as a close associate of the Chief Executive. Their association goes all the way back to Mr. Duterte's days as mayor of Davao City. When Mr. Duterte moved into the Presidency, Christopher Go was one of his first appointees—as Special Assistant to the President—and for his senatorial run Mr. Go received the firm support of his longtime boss.

The two men—former mayor and his former assistant—have been no less close since Christopher Go joined the legislative branch of the government. Senator Go is Mr. Duterte's man in the Senate.

Christopher Go continues to enjoy the full trust of the Chief Executive. Filipinos have come to accept that whatever the neophyte senator says on matters of governance and politics very probably reflects Mr. Duterte's thinking. Even though he is now a member of the legislature, Senator Go remains a regular visitor to Malacanang. The senator's visits have been more frequent during the present public health crisis.

This relationship between the Chief Executive and a member of the legislature is effectively a manifestation of parliamentary government. As in a parliament, a legislator and a member of the Executive Department regularly meet to consult with one another and exchange ideas. The Duterte-Go relationship is parliament at work.

The joinder of Executive and legislative in one body is in fact the most attractive feature of the parliamentary system of government. With the Cabinet members, the Senators and the Representatives joined in one body, there is no need for the legislators to find out Malacanang's positions on particular policy issues and no need for Executive Department officials to appear before Congressional hearings, e.g., the hearings on the Anti-Terrorism Act and the ABS-CBN franchise application. Legislative proposals can be made, debated and approved under one roof. The biggest beneficiary of a one-governing-body system of government will be the General Appropriations Act, whose enactment is an annual exercise in frustration and acrimony.

A mini-parliament within a Presidential system of government: that's what the Duterte-Go relationship is.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Guidelines. We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue..

adblock_message_value
adblock_accept_btn_value