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When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents?

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jtmwatchbiz
13 hours ago, cookie47 said:

HEY,, What about me

Especially you!  I thought that went without saying!

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hyaku

Students used to ask if I could do an American accent. Speaking with teeth tightly clenched sounds good. Even better stuffing 4 sheets of A4 in your mouth works well. The main thing is you have to speak VERY LOUDLY.

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fred42

About the same time they forgot how to spell.

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HeyMike
1 hour ago, fred42 said:

About the same time they forgot how to spell.

 

Americans can spel just fine.... thank you very much.

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SkyMan

I always laugh at ads I see here asking for native English speakers but Brits and Ozzies need not apply.  Hahahahaha

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cookie47
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, SkyMan said:
I always laugh at ads I see here asking for native English speakers but Brits and Ozzies need not apply.  Hahahahaha

I always laugh when I here that "Americans" are teaching English on line.. Pfff,,, Student goes to Australia, WTF is this... Haa.. 

Sent from my MI MAX using Tapatalk
 

Edited by cookie47
Addition

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newtocebu
On 7/21/2020 at 1:35 AM, hyaku said:

Students used to ask if I could do an American accent. Speaking with teeth tightly clenched sounds good. Even better stuffing 4 sheets of A4 in your mouth works well. The main thing is you have to speak VERY LOUDLY.

We Aussies speak with our mouth closed so the flies dont get in

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cookie47

Interesting.. 

Found this on Quora,  Note,, Can't seem to link without adding posters name.  

Question!!! 

Why Do British people spell canceled with two "L"s

Everybody spells cancelled with two l’s because that is the spelling entrenched in the English language. The British, along with the majority of the other anglophone countries of the world, spell it that way. They have no reason to alter the spelling.

EXCEPT: In the 19th century, a certain Noah Webster in America was commissioned to suggest novel spellings so that Americans could take pride in having a version of English they could call their own. He attempted to rationalise many spellings to make them easier to pronounce. Most of his suggestions disappeared without trace, and those that were accepted were mainly insignificant, like single l’s, removing the u from -our words, changing s to z in -ise endings, and the like.

So the short answer is that the single l in canceled is an American spelling. It honestly doesn’t matter to most people how you spell it. The difference is insignificant in the scheme of things.

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BossHog

Spelling in English just a few short centuries ago was a highly fluid and idiosyncratic affair. Read some of those old ship captains' journals or some of the canon authors of literature from the 16th and 17th centuries. Those guys 'couldn't' spell worth a damn!

English orthography has always been a dynamic affair. People often decry modern spelling habits but I would venture that our spelling is now more standardized than it's ever been. Language will always evolve to suit the times however; TwitterSpeak, text-ese, and such are welcome additions to an ever evolving language.

We can and should find the charm in the differences whether historical, contemporary, or geographical. It's a pleasing reminder that English is a vibrant language and not a dead one.

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wondersailor

What is an English accent? Upper class London accent? Lower class London accent? Cornwall ? Yorkshire? And from what period of time did this supposed English accent exist ? Old Saxon? Norman? 1700's, 2020's?  The question should be when did the English lose the English accent and what the hell was it anyway? 

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Paddy
7 hours ago, wondersailor said:

What is an English accent? Upper class London accent? Lower class London accent? Cornwall ? Yorkshire? And from what period of time did this supposed English accent exist ? Old Saxon? Norman? 1700's, 2020's?  The question should be when did the English lose the English accent and what the hell was it anyway? 

A point of order my most excellent nautical chappie, as an English speaker born and raised in England, I don’t have an accent. Everybody else does!

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SkyMan
7 hours ago, wondersailor said:

What is an English accent? Upper class London accent? Lower class London accent? Cornwall ? Yorkshire? And from what period of time did this supposed English accent exist ? Old Saxon? Norman? 1700's, 2020's?  The question should be when did the English lose the English accent and what the hell was it anyway? 

What would you consider the accent spoken on Monty Python's Flying Circus? 

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Paddy

It rather depended on the sketch and characters. 

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hyaku
Posted (edited)
On 7/23/2020 at 10:38 PM, wondersailor said:

What is an English accent? Upper class London accent? Lower class London accent? Cornwall ? Yorkshire? And from what period of time did this supposed English accent exist ? Old Saxon? Norman? 1700's, 2020's?  The question should be when did the English lose the English accent and what the hell was it anyway? 

Standard or RP (received pronunciation) English is that spoken in the London and surrounding areas.

The pronunciation one would commonly hear on something like the BBC although they are far more lax these days.

The first ones from GB to America were Cornish/Devonshire people. I have had Cornish friends abroad the easily pass for Americans with the strong R pronunciation.

Online teacher are not "teachers". Most don't have degree in education. They just talk.

Edited by hyaku

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KID

About the time we figured out that drinking tea cold with ice made the leafy sap water 1000x better to drink

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