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Flying During COVID Pandemic


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Dafey
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Pilots are putting out public pleas for people to start flying again, urging the world to "buy plane tickets like you bought toilet paper."

Captain Chris Pohl, a Virgin Atlantic pilot based in Toulouse, France, and Charlotte Dielman, an EasyJet pilot based in Belgium, have both posted pictures of themselves on Instagram holding up messages encouraging people to take to the skies again when the coronavirus lockdown restrictions start to lift.

In the style of the popular account Dude With Sign, Dielman first posted the message, and Pohl then added his voice with an image of his own.

"The only thing holding us back, is you; our loyal customers/passengers, without you, we're grounded. Let's get the world flying again," Pohl wrote in the caption of his post.

Pohl told Insider that he hasn't flown since March 16, when he landed in London from Boston.

"In my 38 years of flying I've never experienced a crisis like this, including Gulf Wars, 9/11, SARS, volcanic ash, the credit crunch, etc," he said.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/travel/news/pilots-are-calling-for-people-to-buy-plane-tickets-like-you-bought-toilet-paper-and-book-flights-for-after-the-coronavirus-lockdown/ar-BB14YcVu?ocid=spartandhp

 

So what they are really saying is..."If things don't pick up soon my sign will read 'will fly for food'"

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They can pump air in from outside or recycle the air. Pilot's choice. My guess is that it takes more energy to heat the outside air as it is 50 below zero F at altitude so to save energy recycling wou

I would expect seat prices to go up to pay for the lower availability of seats and the inevitable rise in fuel prices when people start traveling again.

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liquido

Once the gates open in the Philippines I shall contribute to the pilots cause and  buy my ticket and I shall return...

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to_dave007

When I read that sign.. "Buy airline tickets like you bought toilet paper".  my FIRST thought was  "yeah..  that's about all you can do with the damn tickets".  But then I realized this was a serious thread.  Sorry.

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papimafioso69

Sitting here in the states  , waiting for the travel to start back . We were  going to wait till a vaccine to come back but I’ll take my chances . I know I might not be able to travel around like my wife and I had planned but just want get home to the province .  Hopefully Duterte starts opening  things up.  I guess we’ll be flying PAL .lol 

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Salty Dog

Pilots are calling for people to fly again

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Dafey

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Plane passengers have been told to check in all luggage to help stop the spread of the virus under new holiday flight rules issued by the Government.

Brits must also wear face coverings at all times and remain seated as much as possible during flights.

And airlines are being encouraged to reduce the number of face-to-face interactions between staff and passengers.

The new guidance are for all UK airlines to follow when it's safe to resume flying.

It states: “You are strongly encouraged to check in baggage to the aircraft hold and minimise any hand baggage.

“This will speed up boarding and disembarking, and minimise the risk of transmission.”

Airlines currently charge additional fees for putting luggage in the hold - and it's unclear whether these fees will be waived.

Checking in a 15kg bag for an easyJet flight from Gatwick to Glasgow on Monday costs an additional £23.99.

British Airways is charging £25 for putting a 23kg bag in the hold for passengers with the cheapest fare on a flight from Heathrow to the same destination on the same date.

Airlines are also being encouraged to extensively clean aircraft, and increase the availability of handwashing and hand sanitiser.

After coronavirus globally grounded the majority of flights, the travel industry is now working towards getting anxious Brits flying again.

At the moment, only essential travel is allowed but a summer holiday could be on the cards.

The Foreign Office has said that the advice is under review, with sources claiming that travel may soon be allowed to low-risk countries.

Budget airline Ryanair has previously said that it may check passengers temperatures before flying once travel resumes.

Only wrapped snacks and drink will be available and travellers will have to request access for the toilet.

And plane interiors will be cleaned and disinfected in between journeys.

Meanwhile, easyJet has said no food will be offered and all passengers must wear masks.

The new guidance has been welcomed by Tim Alderslade, chief executive of Airlines UK, which represents major British carriers.

He said: “They demonstrate how airlines can apply targeted and multi-layered measures to ensure air travel is safe for customers and crew.

“The guidelines pave the way for the introduction of air bridges, and there is no reason we shouldn’t be getting clarity from Government on when and how these will be established over the coming days.”

It comes as a controversial quarantine rule began this week, mandating that nearly all international travellers isolate for 14 days upon arriving in the UK.

The widely criticised measure was dubbed a "shambles" on Monday after many arriving passengers said they were unaware of the rule.

Passengers must fill out a locator form which records where they will be staying for 14 days.

Strict rules mean they can only go out for food and emergencies and Public Health England have said they will be carrying out spot checks.

But there are hopes that air bridges could soon see Brits allowed to enjoy a summer break abroad.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said: “Today’s guidance is a positive next step towards ensuring a safer and more sustainable aviation sector.

“The Government’s advice currently remains to avoid all non-essential travel, but today we are taking the necessary steps to ensure a framework is in place for the aviation industry to bounce back when it is safe for restrictions on travel to be lifted.”

Tim Hawkins, chief strategy officer at Manchester Airports Group, which owns and operates Manchester, London Stansted and East Midlands airports, said the guidance offers “clear information for us, our passengers and our airlines on the steps needed to create a safe travel experience”.

He added: “The guidance is the result of strong collaboration between Government and the aviation industry, drawing on advice from independent medical and scientific experts who have looked specifically at what safety measures are needed at each stage of the travel process.

“With similar protocols being adopted in other countries, and a targeted approach to reopening travel to low-risk countries, we will have the elements in place to get our economy moving again and protect jobs throughout the whole aviation supply chain."

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/news/world/government-issues-new-holiday-flight-rules-including-no-hand-luggage/ar-BB15m7bf?ocid=msedgdhp

 

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Dafey
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Nonessential travel is still not recommended in many countries, including the US, where the Centers for Disease Control warns against it.

Though it doesn't recommend traveling, the CDC says that "most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes."

Some experts agree and say that there are certain things you can do to minimize the risk of infection on flights.

Frequent handwashing, wiping down the tray table, wearing a mask, and having the vent above you blow air down can help reduce risk.

Sitting in the window seat can also somewhat reduce your risk of infection by having fewer people in close proximity than you would in other seats.

Nonessential travel isn't recommended in many places right now — including the US, where the Centers for Disease Control warns against it — but if you have to travel by plane, you might be wondering how to do so safely.

Insider spoke to four experts about how likely getting infected on a plane actually is, and it turns out that the risk of getting sick while flying is lower than you might think — especially if you take appropriate precautions, such as frequent handwashing, wearing a mask, and having vents blow air down.

One more thing you can do to reduce your risk of infection while flying is choosing the window seat.

"Because people are walking by you in the aisle seat, it's shown in outbreaks and norovirus that people are more likely to get ill if they sit on the aisle because people are touching surfaces and walking by," Charles Gerba, a professor of virology at the University of Arizona who has also studied germs on planes, said. "So based on norovirus outbreaks, the window seat is better."

Howard Weiss, a biomathematician and professor in the School of Mathematics at Georgia Tech and an adjunct professor of biology and public health at Emory University who co-authored a study titled "Behaviors, movements, and transmission of droplet-mediated respiratory diseases during transcontinental airline flights," agrees.

"What we found was under normal circumstances — again, we're talking direct transmission of large droplet transmitted infectious diseases — if you sit in a window seat, you are more than a meter (3 feet) away from the aisle," he said. "So if you believe in the one-meter cut-off for infectious droplets, then you're going to have far fewer close proximity contacts. So yes, there's some added benefit to sitting in a window seat. It's modest, but it's certainly a benefit."

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According to Paloma Beamer, associate professor of environmental health sciences at University of Arizona and president of the International Society of Exposure Science, having a wall next to you will essentially reduce the number of people within your 6-foot exposure radius by half, which is why she suggests selecting a window seat if possible.

Beamer said that while it depends on the airline and plane, she found that travelers in the middle seat of a standard plane can have up to 20 other passengers within 6 feet of them on a full flight.

However, she adds that 6 feet is really just a suggestion.

"Six feet 1 inch doesn't make you safe, neither does 5 feet 10 inches make you not safe — it's kind of a range. Some people are going to release a lot more virus when they're sick than other people," she said.

Essentially, your probability of getting infected depends on how close or far you are from an infected person. So, even though sitting in a window seat can help you keep your distance from more people, it's still possible that you could get sick from being near an infected person.

"What our study showed was that if direct transmission, large droplet mediated infectious disease variance falls within a meter or two (3-6 feet), then unless you're seated close to the infectious passenger [...] you have quite a low probability of getting infected," Weiss said.

While many flights are currently operating at low capacity, and some airlines are keeping their middle rows empty to make social distancing somewhat possible on flights, this likely won't last. According to a press release from the International Air Transport Association (IATA), social-distancing measures can reduce planes' maximum load factors to 62%, when most airlines need their planes to be 77% full to break even. Thus, the IATA anticipates fares rising by up to 54% in some places, though this could also mean that flights will simply get filled right back up as soon as there's demand again. This notion is supported by the many reports of nearly full flights traversing the skies recently.

It's worth reiterating that travel is not currently recommended in the US, but if you do choose to travel, it's best to check each state's health and travel advisories, and the CDC's travel recommendations by country.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/11/business/packed-united-flight-crowded-airlines.html

 

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Dafey

 

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MANILA, Philippines — No upward adjustments in air fares are likely in the next two months as ticket prices remain free of fuel surcharge.

The Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB) in its latest advisory said no fuel surcharge would be imposed for domestic and international flights from July 1 to Aug. 31, 2020.

Based on the average price of jet fuel during the two-month evaluating period covering April and May, the CAB said the applicable fuel surcharge for the next two months would remain at Level 0, which means no fuel surcharge will be imposed.

“For April to May 2020, the price of jet fuel averaged $27.3 per barrel, with the dollar exchange rate of 50.65 for the same period. This is equivalent to P8.70 per liter, which corresponds to Level 0 of the passenger fuel surcharge matrix,” CAB said.

“Accordingly, no fuel surcharge shall be imposed for bookings on domestic and international flights originating from the Philippines,” it said.

During the first four months of the year covering the January to February and March to April periods, the applicable fuel surcharge levels have stayed at Level 2, wherein airlines are allowed to impose an increase of P45 to P171 for domestic flights, and P218 to P2,076 for international flights.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/news/national/no-hike-in-air-fare-in-next-2-months/ar-BB15IToS?ocid=msedgdhp

 

 

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SkyMan

No fare hike due to fuel charge I guess.

27 minutes ago, Dafey said:

“For April to May 2020, the price of jet fuel averaged $27.3 per barrel, with the dollar exchange rate of 50.65 for the same period. This is equivalent to P8.70 per liter, which corresponds to Level 0 of the passenger fuel surcharge matrix,” CAB said.

27 minutes ago, Dafey said:

During the first four months of the year covering the January to February and March to April periods, the applicable fuel surcharge levels have stayed at Level 2, wherein airlines are allowed to impose an increase of P45 to P171 for domestic flights, and P218 to P2,076 for international flights.

So did the fuel charge go down?

 

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Dafey

 

30 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

No fare hike due to fuel charge I guess.

So did the fuel charge go down?

 

Fuel prices were down during the early lockdown.

Smart airlines buy future on fuel when it's low. Big Surprise...they rarely pass the savings along to the consumer.

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Dafey

How much hand sanitizer you can bring on a plane

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Preventing the spread of germs is an important part of curbing the number of COVID-19 cases, and hand sanitizer has become a hot commodity as a result. Although it shouldn’t replace washing your hands, sanitizer is a good thing to have on hand when traveling, especially when boarding a flight.

As a result of the present circumstances, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has instituted a medical exemption for hand sanitizer, allowing passengers to bring more than the standard 3.4 ounces of liquids through airport security. Until further notice, each passenger will be allowed to board flights with one liquid hand sanitizer container holding up to 12 ounces.

This might mean that it will take you longer to get through airport security, however, as these containers will require separate screening. But that’s nothing compared to all the other ways travel will change in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/travel/news/how-much-hand-sanitizer-you-can-bring-on-a-plane/ar-BB16dHso?ocid=msedgdhp

 

 

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lamoe

Since hand sanitizer is flammable I would expect "carry on" lighter regs to be changed.

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SkyMan
8 minutes ago, lamoe said:

Since hand sanitizer is flammable I would expect "carry on" lighter regs to be changed.

I thought lighters were already banned.

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Dafey
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Until someone discovers a vaccine, COVID-19 will continue lurking in the background even when the government lifts quarantine. This means maintaining physical distance is still our best bet to avoid getting infected by the virus. To make sure that travelers sit as far from fellow travelers as possible, flag carrier Philippine Airlines has introduced social distancing sections where the aisle or middle seats are left empty in a flight. These "distancing seats" are available starting July 1.

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Passengers have the option of booking a "distancing seat" on the Premium Economy class or the Economy Flex section of the plane. Regular seats (a.k.a. non-"distancing seats"), however, are still available for some rows in the Economy cabin class.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/news/other/you-can-now-choose-distancing-seats-when-booking-a-flight/ar-BB15GnoG?ocid=msedgdhp

 

 

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