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Swissrider
How generous. P20M for a vaccine worth billion of dollars. 
It was P10M.

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New Zealand locked down hard. https://www.zerohedge.com/covid-19/new-zealand-extends-snap-lockdown-covid-spreads-capital Comments following articles on Zerohedge are not moderated except for

This is a follow up to a Post I made regarding my nephew and Partner and child that had covide. He has improved that no oxygen is needed now but it did fall to 90% at one point...The child was on

You act like this is something new...  Talk about what's going on anywhere you like as long as you leave politics out of it. There are thousands of posts on the pandemic that have managed to

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Swissrider
Is that pesos?
It is

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4 am  Mass / social distancing

Blocked right hand lane - very few shields and even some with no masks.

 

IMG_20201216_044553_hdr[1].jpg

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Irenicus
3 hours ago, liquido said:

ready to supply four to 25 million of their respective vaccines starting Q3 2021

Third quarter?  Aiyyyeee - looks like a vaccine vacation t the USA in May or June.

Wonder what's up with the Ruskie vaccine.

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How do they survive here... !?

I had my first government handout a while ago, work hours were reduced just for a few weeks and it was extremely terrifying, as a certain amount of my income goes to loan payback and parent support, luckily my employer turned out fine and I wasn't excluded from their social services, despite being a non-citizen.

But here there is no social service and lockdown has been far more severe. How do locals even survive? I know some of my friends in rental business stopped charging rents, but it's been like 6+ months? Are businesses in malls and streets still running? Is the gov giving out free food or anything at all? can't find anything online.

PS: I hope y all are well too. Although the whole thing feels like a scam...

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to_dave007

They have an incredible ability to live with almost nothing if they have to.

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Dafey

The family was talking about this yesterday. Filipinos, (largely), are used to being poor and doing without. Western countries populace has been living mostly above the poverty line since WW2. 

It's what you're used to and what you know. I've lived in wealth and extreme poverty. Being poor is easier than you think. Looking back we were able to make a box of Jello last 3 days!

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On 12/19/2020 at 6:40 AM, rep1 said:

How do they survive here... !?

I had my first government handout a while ago, work hours were reduced just for a few weeks and it was extremely terrifying, as a certain amount of my income goes to loan payback and parent support, luckily my employer turned out fine and I wasn't excluded from their social services, despite being a non-citizen.

But here there is no social service and lockdown has been far more severe. How do locals even survive? I know some of my friends in rental business stopped charging rents, but it's been like 6+ months? Are businesses in malls and streets still running? Is the gov giving out free food or anything at all? can't find anything online.

PS: I hope y all are well too. Although the whole thing feels like a scam...

We support Tata's cousin's family here - the father finally got a job but is gone 6 days a week  Mom and kids come over for dinner every day  - in Bohol they receive money from the 4 kids

They spent Friday night here due to storm.

22 hours ago, Dafey said:

The family was talking about this yesterday. Filipinos, (largely), are used to being poor and doing without. Western countries populace has been living mostly above the poverty line since WW2. 

It's what you're used to and what you know. I've lived in wealth and extreme poverty. Being poor is easier than you think. Looking back we were able to make a box of Jello last 3 days!

Yep, poor is a reference (comparing one social level to another), destitute / starving is different. If everyone around you is in same the boat it dosen't feel as bad and people share.

We were lower middle / upper lower class (mother had to get a job to insure we had food / clothes). Didn't feel "poor" until I had a GF from Chicago's Gold Coast $$$$$$. Her allowance was more than my mom made in a week.

25 minutes ago, jaybee747 said:

How will we know the vaccine is working? Will the survival rate go from 99.7% to 99.8?

It's a preventative not a cure.  Will know when infection rate declines.

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Salty Dog

England’s new strain of SARS-CoV-2: what we know

One big question is what this variant means for vaccines: will they still be effective?

Ewan Birney

What do we know about the new COVID strain? Like all viruses, SARS-CoV-2 changes. Like a manuscript that is being endlessly copied, letter by letter, it accumulates typos — changes in its genetic code. Compared with other viruses, this one changes at quite a slow rate.

But we have seen a new version of the virus’s genetic code — its core manuscript — emerge in London and South East England, and it has some interesting properties.

Firstly, it has accumulated quite a number of changes in the relatively recent past. This points to an interesting history for this strain and also means its biology — and the way it behaves in our bodies — could have changed too.

Secondly, it is growing in the frequency at which we see it in infected people. That could be due to chance — some quirk in restrictions which means it is growing, or it could be that it is displacing other lineages of the virus. It’s something that is very hard to know for sure. This study is called phylodynamics and phylogeography, and this virus is being so intensively studied and tracked that we are seeing ‘recurrent but real’ mutations a fair bit, which makes this analysis more complex. Nevertheless colleagues such as Andrew Rambaut, Nick Goldman and Emma Hodcroft can untangle this. They and other scientists are pretty sure this increase is a property of the virus, not simply that this variant was in the right place and right time.

What don’t we know?

We don’t (yet) know if this change in biology changes other aspects, in particular disease progression. Given the numbers of cases in the South East, and that hospitalization rates do not seem to have changed massively, there’s unlikely to be a huge difference. But this variant could still be different in a host of ways. Those could include how it transmits — it might affect different age ranges more or less — or it could cause clinical progression of the disease to differ. Researchers will be looking very carefully at this.

The other big question is what this variant means for vaccines: will they still be effective? It’s worth stressing that there are thousands of variants of this virus — we are looking at just one of them. Overall the changes we have seen are still small. The fact that all three successful vaccines are tested in an environment of mixtures of many different strains and they have high efficacy rates is a reassuring place to be; but this deserves more attention.

It’s also worth stressing that although the ‘business end’ of the immune system is producing B-cell antibodies — a sort of guided missile that latches onto viruses, prevents viral action and triggers their destruction by macrophages (Pac-Man-like immune cells) there are also T cells.

T cells come in two types. One is a sort of ‘public health of cells’ check. These ones regularly knock on the doors of cells, looking to see if there’s anything unusual about them. If something dodgy is found, the cells are triggered to commit suicide. The other is a ‘command-and-control’ type. These T cells knock on the door of B cells and effectively say, ‘please show me what you’ve caught using your antibodies’ using a similar mechanism to the ‘public health’ T cells. If these cells find anything, rather than triggering the suicide switch they say: ‘permission granted to replicate like crazy and get those bastards’.

The good thing about T-cell immunity is that it works off fragments of viral proteins, not the whole thing. That means any one mutation can at most impact one fragment and the immune response to it.

When we are looking at immune response, it is easier to measure the B-cell response (the presence of antibodies — those guided missiles) but in fact the T-cell response is just as important and is less sensitive to the precise overall configuration of the virus. (If you are thinking how smart this system sounds, you’re right — the immune system is one of the jewels of mammalian evolution.)

The COVID vaccines we have developed stimulate both B and T-cell immunity, so there’s good reason to think that they will protect us against a variety of SARS-CoV-2 strains, this one included. Of course, that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t check.

But in terms of NPIs — non-pharmaceutical interventions like the tier restrictions and Track and Trace — England will have to up its game, as most other governments likely will too: we need more effective interventions to reduce transmission. The good thing is that we have a surveillance system keeping watch for and tracking new strains across the UK at the detailed ‘letter by letter’ level. Many other European countries do too. With the sheer number of COVID cases worldwide, this is unlikely to be the first time the virus has mutated to be more infectious — it might just be the first time we’ve detected that it has done so.

https://spectator.us/england-strain-sars-cov-2-know/

 

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profits101

from a YHOO article noting measures at restricting travel to Brits and others as necessary related to "new variant." But, it's been awhile since I have seen any update on vaccine availability. I should not be so surprised at the timeline or the hazy wording of where this vaccine is coming from...

"Duterte pledged free vaccines for the country's 108 million population, with shipments and inoculation to start in May.

The Philippines is in talks to acquire around 80 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines, including from Pfizer Inc, Moderna and Britain's AstraZeneca, as well as Johnson & Johnson, India's Novavax Inc, China's Sinovac and Russia's Gamaleya Institute."

https://ph.yahoo.com/news/philippines-eyes-more-covid-curbs-152449428.html

Quote

Philippines eyes more COVID curbs to halt new variants

By Neil Jerome Morales | Sat, 26 December 2020

MANILA (Reuters) - The Philippines approved measures on Saturday to slow the spread of new, more infectious coronavirus variants, as President Rodrigo Duterte warned of a second lockdown should cases spike before the country gets its first vaccines in May.

Countries around the world have in recent days closed their borders to flights from Britain and South Africa, where more infectious variants have been detected.

Duterte extended an existing a ban on flights from Britain by two weeks to mid-January, and said the Philippines would impose travel curbs on countries with local community transmission of the UK variant.

With more than 469,000 infections and 9,067 deaths, the Philippines has the second highest number of COVID-19 cases and casualties in Southeast Asia, next to Indonesia.

Neither the UK nor the South African variant have been detected there yet, however.

In an emergency meeting with health experts and government officials, Duterte also ordered a 14-day quarantine for passengers who have come from or transited through Britain, and from countries where the more infectious COVID-19 variant first identified there was detected, including Hong Kong, Singapore, Australia and Japan.

Duterte pledged free vaccines for the country's 108 million population, with shipments and inoculation to start in May.

"If (in the meantime) severity in numbers would demand that we take corrective measures immediately, then we should just have to go back to lockdown," he said.

In mid-March, the Philippines imposed one of the world's longest and toughest coronavirus lockdowns, which were gradually relaxed in June to allow a slow reopening of the economy.

The Philippines is in talks to acquire around 80 million doses of COVID-19 vaccines, including from Pfizer Inc, Moderna and Britain's AstraZeneca, as well as Johnson & Johnson, India's Novavax Inc, China's Sinovac and Russia's Gamaleya Institute.

 

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On 12/19/2020 at 2:07 AM, Dafey said:

The family was talking about this yesterday. Filipinos, (largely), are used to being poor and doing without. Western countries populace has been living mostly above the poverty line since WW2. 

It's what you're used to and what you know. I've lived in wealth and extreme poverty. Being poor is easier than you think. Looking back we were able to make a box of Jello last 3 days!

Don't they have bills and rent to pay? Electricity, water, gas, ...? 

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2 vids - 2nd more informative

What To Know About New Covid Strain Spreading In U.K. | All In | MSNBC & UK Coronavirus Mutation | A Doctor Explains

 

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to_dave007

If true.. this may significantly change the next few years.

Russia is developing world’s first Covid-19 antidote, preclinical studies show drug effectiveness of more than 99%

Russia's Federal Medical and Biological Agency (FMBA) has announced the development of a drug to fight against Covid-19, which would become the world's first direct-acting antiviral antidote if clinical trials are successful.
According to Veronika Skvortsova, the head of FMBA, studies thus far have shown it is more than 99% effective.

“This is the first etiotropic drug that directly affects the virus. In fact, this is an antidote for coronavirus infection,” she informed Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin on Wednesday, noting that preclinical studies have been completed, which have shown the remedy to be “completely safe” and “highly efficient.”

Etiotropic means that the treatment is directed against the cause of a disease.

Director of Soros-funded HRW slammed for accusing Hungary of ‘scoring political points’ with imports of Russia's Sputnik V vaccine
Skvortsova told the prime minister that the FMBA is ready to apply for permission for further testing, which they hope to get before the New Year.

“If clinical trials confirm the effectiveness of this drug, it will be the first safe, effective, direct-acting antiviral drug that has no analogs in the world,” she explained.

The FMBA is also working on a separate drug for the treatment of the most complex coronavirus cases, which suppresses and prevents a physiological reaction called ‘hypercytokinemia’. Also known as a ‘cytokine storm’, it is an immune response that leads to body tissue damage, and is thought by some to be causing Covid-19 deaths.

In May, the Russian Ministry of Health approved an anti-coronavirus drug called ‘Avifavir’, a Favipiravir-based treatment that has been used in Japan since 2014 against severe forms of influenza. The medication is being produced domestically.

If effective, the antidote won't be Russia's only breakthrough during the Covid-19 crisis. Earlier this year, Russia became the first country to announce the registration of a coronavirus vaccine named Sputnik V. After trials, it was revealed to be 95 percent effective in producing antibodies after 40 days. Earlier this month, Putin ordered the start of mass vaccination, with it eventually beginning in Moscow on December 5.

https://www.rt.com/russia/511116-world-first-covid19-antidote/

 

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