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papimafioso69

Safer in the Philippines or USA

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papimafioso69

Just anyone’s thoughts . Leaving May 5 . 

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Woolf
Posted (edited)

 

That would all depend on location

Edited by Dafey
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Dafey

Just my opinion...the Philippines have been doing a much better job of isolating and social distancing than the US. I believe that curve has been flattened in this country and it hasn't even peaked in the US.

The question might be where would I find better health care?

In the US the hospitals in the hot spots are already at capacity and the demand keeps growing. Here ???

At the end of the day, I'm glad I'm here not the US

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Banacon

I think its safer here, but we are on a smaller island with lockdown implemented. My flight is on june 2 to taiwan then seattle then on to missoula. I am wondering as deaths climb in USA, maybe airlines will cancel flights there. Any rate, being a BB i am not worrying about overstaying. Might try back next December or so if flight is cancelled.

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menehune
Posted (edited)

I think its much better here. One of my friends just went back to Cali from Seoul Korea. Entering La air port he had no problem just walking right through, no questions asked. Some of his friends said they didnt even turn it the questionnaire. Some workers no masks. Even they have had to close down parks and beaches cause people still are going out like nothing.

The other day i went out to get gas past the check point here. Coming back in they had me get out of my car and sprayed me down. I said Thank you then smiled and i left. I so much wanted to go get something for them. 

Edited by menehune
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smokey
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, papimafioso69 said:

Just anyone’s thoughts . Leaving May 5 . 

Well medically speaking usa as a foreigner how much love would you receive if sick if your quarantined in a hospital 14 days that could be costly and many x military or medicare can get free medical in usa here its self pay

Edited by smokey

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Dafey

Have a buddy in Minneapolis and sounds like he caught the Humongous Fungus and is heading in for testing. They said as long as his son and wife aren't showing symptoms the son can go visit the ex and brother and the wife can continue to work at the grocery store! WTF? You can be contagious for 48 hours before you show symptoms! I wonder how many they will end up killing because they refuse to stop socializing?

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smokey
Posted (edited)
45 minutes ago, Banacon said:

I think its safer here, but we are on a smaller island with lockdown implemented. My flight is on june 2 to taiwan then seattle then on to missoula. I am wondering as deaths climb in USA, maybe airlines will cancel flights there. Any rate, being a BB i am not worrying about overstaying. Might try back next December or so if flight is cancelled.

Well i think every case is counted in usa and cost of treatment is if needed free ..  Here i think if you have a choice of buying food or going doctor you buy food hope for the best. I hope they will be able to give free testing to locals

Edited by smokey
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papimafioso69

I don’t know about free . In California they turned away a teenager with no insurance and he died going to another hospital . Testing is still a problem here also . You need to have more than 3 symptoms . I’m still going to make our trip , unless civil unrest happens in Manila . Off too Leyte after our quarantine . I’ve always been lucky . Hopefully it stays that way . Thanks for the input .

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to_dave007
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, papimafioso69 said:

Just anyone’s thoughts . Leaving May 5 . 

Just how are you planning to leave?  

Oh wait.. you are in USA now.. Right and planning to fly here.  and then travel to Leyte..  lol.. Good luck.  I'm in Tuburan Cebu..  and as of today my German friend 10 km up the road can't get to here because of travel restrictions..  and there is NOONE sick here yet..  But maybe you'll get lucky.

Edited by to_dave007
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JohnSurrey
3 hours ago, papimafioso69 said:

Just anyone’s thoughts . Leaving May 5 . 

I think if you have any underlying conditions/particularly old and/or think you'll probably need a ventilator get out and

If you're in a high risk area... see map https://ncovtracker.doh.gov.ph/  then get out... and...

 

I'm in Leyte - most places here have locked down quite tightly - unfortunately where I am they haven't - only you know what's it like or likely to be like where you're going.

 

 

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lamoe
3 hours ago, papimafioso69 said:

I don’t know about free . In California they turned away a teenager with no insurance and he died going to another hospital . Testing is still a problem here also . You need to have more than 3 symptoms . I’m still going to make our trip , unless civil unrest happens in Manila . Off too Leyte after our quarantine . I’ve always been lucky . Hopefully it stays that way . Thanks for the input .

Here's more info and it appears more to it than initially listed cause of death and why he was turned away. Usually  is with this type of sensational story.

Was Coronavirus the main cause of death or an existing condition that the virus enhanced as in many of those 65+ ?

Did they turn him away because he was in critical condition which they couldn't cope with or simply no insurance?

Quote

 

https://www.debt.org/medical/emergency-room-urgent-care-costs/

The main reason that so many emergency room visits are for non-urgent care is that hospital ERs are required by federal law to provide care to all patients, regardless of their ability to pay. Since they can’t be turned away, patients without insurance, or the necessary funds to pay out-of-pocket costs, often utilize emergency rooms as their main health care provider. This puts tremendous strain on ERs and limits their ability to attend quickly to health emergencies.

It is estimated that more than $18 billion could be saved annually if those patients whose medical problems are considered “avoidable” or “non-urgent” were to take advantage of primary or preventive health care and not rely on ERs for their medical needs.

What Are Urgent Care Centers?

Urgent care centers are a valid bridge between your primary care physician and emergency room services. They evolved in the 1990s to serve the 73% of Americans who say they have no access to their primary care doctors at night or on weekends.

There is no appointment necessary at the estimated 9,300 urgent care centers in the U.S. They usually are open seven days a week until 9 p.m. or later. The centers are staffed primarily by family care and emergency room physicians and can duplicate nearly all the services offered in the traditional doctor’s office or emergency room with two major exceptions:

They don’t keep medical histories like you expect at a primary care doctor’s office.

They do not have the sophisticated medical equipment and staff expertise found in hospital emergency rooms to handle life-threatening conditions.

Urgent care centers do have x-ray machines, lab testing and most of the equipment needed for treating medical conditions ranging from simple things like flu shots or blood-sugar tests to more sophisticated treatment like casting broken bones.

Nearly all their procedures are covered by insurance and the average cost is about $100-$150 per patient.

Walk-in clinics are similar to urgent care centers, only they are typically are staffed by nurse practitioners instead of doctors. That limits the services they can offer, but generally speaking, if you need a shot, treatment for a cold, flu or slight sprain, you could get it at a walk-in clinic. The walk-in clinics are located in pharmacies, grocery stores and retail outlets.

Can I Visit Urgent Care Without Insurance?

The answer is “YES” you can go to an Urgent Care Center without insurance and be treated, but if you can’t afford to pay, they could turn you away.

 


 

Quote

 

https://www.businessinsider.com/coronavirus-uninsured-teen-dies-refused-care-mayor-says-2020-3

An uninsured 17-year-old in Los Angeles County who died on March 18 was turned away from an urgent-care center before rushing to a public hospital, according to Lancaster, California, Mayor R. Rex Parris.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health initially reported Tuesday that the teen tested positive for the coronavirus but later backtracked and said the CDC would evaluate his case further.

More than 27 million Americans do not have health insurance.

The US has more COVID-19 cases than any other nation.

Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A 17-year-old was rushing to a public hospital in Los Angeles County when he went into cardiac arrest.

He was still alive upon arrival, Lancaster, California, Mayor R. Rex Parris said in a statement. But the medical staff were able to keep him alive for only another six hours.

Time was short, and the hospital was not his first stop. He went to an urgent-care center first and complained of respiratory symptoms, his family said, the Los Angeles Times reported. There, according to Parris, he was refused treatment because he didn't have health insurance.

"He didn't have insurance, so they did not treat him," Parris said. The staff of the unknown clinic told him to go to Antelope Valley Hospital's emergency room. "But by the time he got there, it was too late." 

Parris expressed frustration with the urgent-care center that turned the teen away because of his lack of health insurance. "When a kid comes in respiratory distress, stabilize him and call an ambulance; don't ask for insurance," Parris told CNN.

The county health department included him in the coronavirus death toll, then backtracked

The teen died on March 18. Six days later, on March 23, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health attributed the death to the coronavirus, which had made him the first known teenager to die from COVID-19 in the US. His father is also suspected of having the virus, according to the Los Angeles Times.

But later that day, the county's department of health said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention would reevaluate the case, saying "there may be an alternate explanation for this fatality."

"The juvenile fatality that the Los Angeles County Department Public Health reported earlier today will require further evaluation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention," the county said in a statement. "Though early tests indicated a positive result for COVID-19, the case is complex, and there may be an alternate explanation for this fatality. Patient privacy prevents our offering further details at this time."

On Wednesday, Barbara Ferrer, the county public-health director, removed the boy from the death toll and said there were "extenuating circumstances that pointed to an alternative diagnosis," according to The Mercury News.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom rebuked the county for backtracking.

"We all have been reminded in this moment it's not just speed, it's accuracy that must be front and center," he said.

Local authorities say he didn't have preexisting conditions

Both Parris and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said the boy did not have preexisting health conditions, which are known to increase the severity of COVID-19.

"He had been sick for a few days; he had no previous health conditions. On the Friday before he died, he was healthy; he was socializing with his friends," Parris said. "By Wednesday, he was dead."

"Once you go into respiratory issues ... and you have a fever, that is the time to get medical treatment without delay," Parris added.

On Friday afternoon, Los Angeles County had 1,216 coronavirus cases and 21 deaths from the disease. The US has more than 97,000 cases, the most of any country. More than 27 million Americans, 8.5% of the population, are uninsured. 

Healthcare workers in California said authorities have not counted all coronavirus cases. One anonymous emergency-room doctor told BuzzFeed News, "The numbers are grossly underreported. I know for a fact that we've had three deaths in one county where only one is listed on the website."

 

 

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RR3

Most safe aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt who can destroy many a country in one blow. But cannot save the crew.  

Give free tickets to seniors on cruises round the world. And then forget it  Mayday Mayday. Shut up and *ie. I mean who wanna go on a cruise...

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Irenicus

Unlike S. Korea or even Italy, US is not flattening the curve and is looking at upwards to a quarter of a million dead.  Not good at all.

Philippines has less cases but they are not nearly doing the amount of testing that is needed to stay ahead of it.  The good thing is that Filipinos are superstitious and paranoid and doing well at social distancing (at least in my area).  The bad thing is that people are already hungry and the police had to crack a few heads up in QC during a demonstration.  

If civil unrest blows up here, things could get pretty ugly.

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to_dave007
32 minutes ago, Irenicus said:

If civil unrest blows up here, things could get pretty ugly.

Good point.  Glad I'm not in one of the larger population centres.

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