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JohnSurrey

Grounding Refrigerator

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JohnSurrey

Had to buy a new fridge...

Shop advised us to wait 2 hours before plugging it in and setting the temp to max - then wait another 3 hours before adjusting the temperature and putting the food in...

So I did all that and then noticed there was a grounding wire in the Food box at the bottom with instructions...

Q. Do I need to ground it and if I do - can I just attach the wire to a long screw (how long) and screw that into the concrete floor?

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Daddle

Good idea. The intent is the wire will carry any stray of fault current to the floor instead of your body. The archaic wiring practice in PI make grounding thru the power cord impractical.

Better if the wire led to the building ground stake. Concrete on soil tends to be damp in PI so that can usually be enough.

That long wait they specify seems excessive. However in practice it does cover all the issues that the refrigerator may have in getting itself up and running. Oil and ice in the tubes, motor cooling, overload from warm food, etc. etc. are all elegantly addressed by simply waiting.

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easy44

Yup, I had the same problem so the repair guy drilled a hole in the seam between the wall and floor. Stripped the wire, stuck it in the hole and held it in place with a nail. Solved the problem and no more shocks. 

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SkyMan
Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, easy44 said:

Yup, I had the same problem so the repair guy drilled a hole in the seam between the wall and floor. Stripped the wire, stuck it in the hole and held it in place with a nail. Solved the problem and no more shocks. 

If you get a little tingle, pour some water in the hole.  (Nothing suggestive intended there.)

Edited by SkyMan
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Headshot

Creating a ground on an ungrounded system can be very dangerous. You might be creating the best (or only) ground in the neighborhood.

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Woolf
2 minutes ago, Headshot said:

Creating a ground on an ungrounded system can be very dangerous. You might be creating the best (or only) ground in the neighborhood.

It will be a problem only  if there is a fault in the equipment that is grounded to "Wall"

if there is a short from a hot to metal frame on equipment the "wall" ground my not be enough

to trip the breaker 

all pole transformers are grounded. Veco area the center tap, cebeco and other areas with hot and neutral the neutral is grounded at the trafo pole, at least 

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JohnSurrey

I noticed when I added the ground wire that there is already a ground wire from the cabinet to the back rubber leg and I read somewhere that for most that is sufficient - whether that's true or not I have no idea - electrics are not my strong suit.

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Woolf

if the between the rubber leg and the floor  

could be enough to take leakage current   maybe

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