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SkyMan

Beware of Chinese copper wire

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SkyMan

So I'm working on my bike, trying to figure out where some minor electrical problem is because one of the front blinkers isn't working right.  When I got the bike I replaced the front blinker bulbs with a LED disk inside the stock blinker housing.  I also replaced the stock rear running/brake like LED array with a brighter one that also did the turn signal function and removed the stock blinkers (bulbs).  The rear LED panel also has a flashing mode that works well as a four way flasher type set up that my bike didn't have.  In order to get that to carry to the front blinkers I altered the wiring a bit so the LED board in the rear also controls the blinkers in the front rather than working straight of the flasher unit.  It worked well for years but now only one of the front blinkers is working correctly.  To narrow down the location of the problem, I needed a jumper wire to run the length of the bike.  I had some red/black speaker I'd bought from a local electronic shop a year or so ago so started stripping the ends.  One end stripped ok but the other end would not.  Try and try the wire would break off.  Maybe my strippers are too old and dull?  Even had to use a razor knife to cut off the insulation.  Started trouble shooting but nothing worked.  Tugged on the copper on the end of the wire that I'd stripped and strands pulled out of the insulation with some kind of greenish white dust.  Cut off some more insulation and razored again and the Fluke meter said it still wouldn't conduct.  Is the copper somehow oxidizing to dust inside the insulation?  I need to get some better wire.

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lamoe
2 hours ago, SkyMan said:

So I'm working on my bike, trying to figure out where some minor electrical problem is because one of the front blinkers isn't working right.  When I got the bike I replaced the front blinker bulbs with a LED disk inside the stock blinker housing.  I also replaced the stock rear running/brake like LED array with a brighter one that also did the turn signal function and removed the stock blinkers (bulbs).  The rear LED panel also has a flashing mode that works well as a four way flasher type set up that my bike didn't have.  In order to get that to carry to the front blinkers I altered the wiring a bit so the LED board in the rear also controls the blinkers in the front rather than working straight of the flasher unit.  It worked well for years but now only one of the front blinkers is working correctly.  To narrow down the location of the problem, I needed a jumper wire to run the length of the bike.  I had some red/black speaker I'd bought from a local electronic shop a year or so ago so started stripping the ends.  One end stripped ok but the other end would not.  Try and try the wire would break off.  Maybe my strippers are too old and dull?  Even had to use a razor knife to cut off the insulation.  Started trouble shooting but nothing worked.  Tugged on the copper on the end of the wire that I'd stripped and strands pulled out of the insulation with some kind of greenish white dust.  Cut off some more insulation and razored again and the Fluke meter said it still wouldn't conduct.  Is the copper somehow oxidizing to dust inside the insulation?  I need to get some better wire.

Typically happens with copper coated Aluminum and copper mixed with other materials

Pure copper tends to form a protective oxidation shell similar to Cor10 Steel

But also depends on environment

image.png.d3e8af795f9d88b6fb02d53c05460b97.png

 

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Daddle

When moisture enters the cut end of a wire the metal will corrode. Most often black but green is possible too. It can easily wick up the entire length of the wire.

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bert
19 hours ago, Daddle said:

When moisture enters the cut end of a wire the metal will corrode. Most often black but green is possible too. It can easily wick up the entire length of the wire.

yes had a problem  with a damaged generator delivered by  LBC  after i open the cardboard packing  they done a runner had to get a tecki to fix the aluminum copper coated wire goes now  they advises copper wire was the insert got ya sucker

f CHINA

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wondersailor
On 2/21/2020 at 8:22 AM, SkyMan said:

So I'm working on my bike, trying to figure out where some minor electrical problem is because one of the front blinkers isn't working right.  When I got the bike I replaced the front blinker bulbs with a LED disk inside the stock blinker housing.  I also replaced the stock rear running/brake like LED array with a brighter one that also did the turn signal function and removed the stock blinkers (bulbs).  The rear LED panel also has a flashing mode that works well as a four way flasher type set up that my bike didn't have.  In order to get that to carry to the front blinkers I altered the wiring a bit so the LED board in the rear also controls the blinkers in the front rather than working straight of the flasher unit.  It worked well for years but now only one of the front blinkers is working correctly.  To narrow down the location of the problem, I needed a jumper wire to run the length of the bike.  I had some red/black speaker I'd bought from a local electronic shop a year or so ago so started stripping the ends.  One end stripped ok but the other end would not.  Try and try the wire would break off.  Maybe my strippers are too old and dull?  Even had to use a razor knife to cut off the insulation.  Started trouble shooting but nothing worked.  Tugged on the copper on the end of the wire that I'd stripped and strands pulled out of the insulation with some kind of greenish white dust.  Cut off some more insulation and razored again and the Fluke meter said it still wouldn't conduct.  Is the copper somehow oxidizing to dust inside the insulation?  I need to get some better wire.

In the US, when using wire for an external application, I always used tinned wire. This wire is used in marine applications to prevent corrosion. There is also oxygen free wire used to prevent corrosion which requires tinning of exposed ends. This is mostly used in higher end audio wire. Good luck finding either here!

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Daddle

Like plumbing parts “What color do you want, sir, brass or stainless?”

Both rust after the paint or plating wears off.

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