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Dafey

Older workers can complement Gen Z skills

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Dafey

 

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A MULTI-GENERATIONAL work force presents opportunities for older workers to compensate for the shortcomings of millennials and Generation Z, and vice versa, LinkedIn said, citing the results of its Opportunity Index 2020 study.

LinkedIn reported that while ageism may discourage older workers, various generations in the workforce present an opportunity to fill in generational skills shortcomings.

“The biggest skills gaps that we see today are soft skills among gen Z and millennials, and tech skills among the older generation. We encourage companies to hire for complementary skills and to promote collaboration and bi-directional mentorship among their workforce,” LinkedIn Asia Pacific Managing Director Olivier Legrand said.

The study took in responses from 30,000 participants across 22 markets, with 1,000 from the Philippines. Generations covered under the survey were Baby Boomers (those born between 1946 and 1964), Generation X (1965-1980), Millennials (1981-1996), and Generation Z (1997 and later).

Globally, LinkedIn said that 43% of Baby Boomers said they struggle with age in the workplace while 25% of Generation Z workers said they view the lack of work experience as a problem.

In the Philippines, LinkedIn said the youngest workers, those from Generation Z, are the most uncertain about their work prospects and are concerned with “the environment, education, and health.”

“For the first time, four generations are working together. It’s time for businesses to set aside hiring biases against age, and embrace the multigenerational workforce as an opportunity,” Mr. Legrand said.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/health/wellness/older-workers-can-complement-gen-z-skills-—-linkedin/ar-BBZVePg?ocid=spartandhp

 

 

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lamoe

Other than positions requiring an engineering degree, it's easier to learn / obtain the technical skills usually required then the social ones.

Most older people,  can operate a smartphone or PC and the majority of "technical" workplace skills are just an adaption of the same principles.

Teamwork, work ethic, problem solving, empathy, are much harder to develop.

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Cgu
1 hour ago, lamoe said:

Other than positions requiring an engineering degree, it's easier to learn / obtain the technical skills usually required then the social ones.

Most older people,  can operate a smartphone or PC and the majority of "technical" workplace skills are just an adaption of the same principles.

Teamwork, work ethic, problem solving, empathy, are much harder to develop.

Haven't met any baby boomer who can actually master the technical skills needed in high tech.  Suprising this is coming from LinkedIn, where one of the biggest trend,  besides Kubernetes/Docker, was developed  - Kafka ( good example haven't met any with any Kafka skills).

Also the social skills needed nowadays are totally different, many older guys could not adapt to agile environments (like scrum teams, Safe etc. ) or worse holacracy and the like. Suppose with these types of organization you cannot hide - no dead wood.

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Salty Dog
59 minutes ago, Cgu said:

Haven't met any baby boomer who can actually master the technical skills needed in high tech… 

What a BS statement. Ever heard of Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook, Steve Wozniak and the millions of other Baby Boomers who created and mastered high tech… 

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Cgu
3 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

What a BS statement. Ever heard of Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Larry Page, Sergey Brin, Steve Jobs, Tim Cook, Steve Wozniak and the millions of other Baby Boomers who created and mastered high tech… 

You are behind the curve, they build up their business when they were in their 20s (maybe max. 30s). We are talking today! Also, we are not taliking about tech startup founder, but skills., which can be used in high tech.

These guys are looking now every year for the brightest minds, but they cannot keep up with skills needed (they don't need anymore anyhow).

Anyway, so tell me any babyboomer who started a tech company the last 8 years (not just giving capital, but new technology). You must be looking at a very low percentage, exceptions.

Btw Tim Cook (and to some exrend Steve Jobs) is not a tech guys, he is a CEO, so a sales man.

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Salty Dog
34 minutes ago, Cgu said:

You are behind the curve, they build up their business when they were in their 20s (maybe max. 30s). We are talking today! Also, we are not taliking about tech startup founder, but skills., which can be used in high tech...

Then maybe you should have said that was what you ment, because this is what you said: 

1 hour ago, Cgu said:

Haven't met any baby boomer who can actually master the technical skills needed in high tech

By the way, what are the technical skills needed in high tech that you're referring to… 

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Paddy

I’ll bite. @Salty Dog and @Cgu - you’re both right and Cgu you’re a little “wrong” also. You’re not allowing for the passage of time and changing capabilities of both hardware and software or the changing nature of people’s careers and their workplace(s).
 

I kept up to date in technology skills until I stopped programming for money. Then I started learning different (and more soft) skills. 
I agree that people who don’t continue to learn don’t come across well - but discounting conceptual learnings from earlier days is not smart. None of the fancy phone apps I use handle timeout exceptions well and I often have a very slow connection so I get to see it. Few of today’s everyday programmers understand complex batch scheduling - and it’s still out there. And sure, how many boomers can spell Kafka let alone know what it is or use it? Why would they?

My brother, also a boomer, could design and program financial applications managing billions of dollars on Tandem machines (the ones where something could break but they’d still keep going) and not lose a cent. He also took one of the very first Computer Science degrees available in the UK. He would probably have been offended by your early statement. 
 

I do agree with your comment about the soft skills though. It’s not easy adapting to things like agile techniques when most of your life is spent in hierarchical environments. Your time would be better spent mentoring those you have to work with rather than criticizing them. 

Lastly, to say Steve Jobs was not technical but a salesman...hmmm. I think he was technically gifted (Steve Wozniak was probably more technically gifted) design gifted and sales gifted. I expect he became less technical as running the company became more important. Why not read up on Xerox PARC sometime. Ever wondered why Apple was first to use a mouse?

 

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lamoe
2 hours ago, Cgu said:

Haven't met any baby boomer who can actually master the technical skills needed in high tech.

You haven't met me  or very many of the other seniors here have you?

1 hour ago, Cgu said:

You are behind the curve, they build up their business when they were in their 20s (maybe max. 30s). We are talking today! Also, we are not taliking about tech startup founder, but skills., which can be used in high tech.

These guys are looking now every year for the brightest minds, but they cannot keep up with skills needed (they don't need anymore anyhow).

Anyway, so tell me any babyboomer who started a tech company the last 8 years (not just giving capital, but new technology). You must be looking at a very low percentage, exceptions.

Btw Tim Cook (and to some exrend Steve Jobs) is not a tech guys, he is a CEO, so a sales man.

You're right no Baby Boomer has started a high tech company - that is for the very young

What are these skills that the Jobs are so desperate for? How many have the "brightest minds"? 1 in 100, 1,000, 10,000 - what about the rest - they're no better than the Boomers - in fact worse because of undesirable / unrealistic attitudes / expectations of many.

Keep up or acquire? Sure we can  - just need to go back to school - we understand the value of actually learning and don't have to be "woke" to do so.

I do believe several of these skills would be of use in at least some tech companies

CAD / CAM design, Finite Structural Analysis, Methods Time Management, Electra-Chemical Deburing / Machining systems design,  Ultrasonic Machining systems design, 12 axis geometric work holding and coordinate measuring systems design.

You'd be surprised by the tech skill sets mastered by some of the Boomers. :oldtimer:

Not cutting edge but better than "want fries with that?"

 

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Cgu
12 minutes ago, lamoe said:

You'd be surprised by the tech skill sets mastered by some of the Boomers. :oldtimer:

No, I wouldnt. Why?  I am sure they have good skills, but other skills are needed.

But look up the high tech high paying jobs, easy..very different skill set required. Time moves on, that is life. You cannot compare technology to 5 or even 10 years ago. For 5G per exampleyou cannot simple go and study it, you need to be on the front line, in the lab appling all the 3GPP standards and implement it.

29 minutes ago, Paddy said:

Few of today’s everyday programmers understand complex batch scheduling

They do, but it is not really of use. Nowadays you have micro services running on dockers controlled by kubernetes. Everything is nearly real time, services dispatch messages in the millions per second and every service can react independenly (written in any language you want) to it. So the overall system is more resilient and more elastic (cloud technology). 

Look at all the services you have! Everything is online, superfast. Order something and the whole chain acts independently, down to the delivery. How? A lot of micro services around, even in the trucks...they are all interconnected, but not coupled ( every bit was done unaware of the other services, so thousands of teams can work independently and unaware of each other, but at the end each can use each other...like a big micro organism)

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Cgu
59 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

By the way, what are the technical skills needed in high tech that you're referring to… 

Well, per example look at some IT jobs

https://www.indeed.com.ph/m/viewjob?jk=2ae383befd5ffc58&from=serp&prevUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.indeed.com.ph%2Fm%2Fjobs%3Fq%3DKafka%26l%3D%26fromTravel%3D1%26start%3D20%26pp%3DgQAUAAAAAAAAAAAAAAABekraCwAbAQEBB3j53rqVaGYUgO1uUSVVApL9ugqeNYRlAAMCAAE

Or here

https://www.indeed.com.ph/m/viewjob?jk=62205dd018067e22&from=serp

But do not bother if you do not have these skills...

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Salty Dog
34 minutes ago, Cgu said:

Why would I want any job paying that little? That's Walmart pay here. My retirement pay is higher than that.

Why would anyone with such skills move to the Philippines to work for so little pay… 

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Cgu
13 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

Why would I want any job paying that little? That's Walmart pay here. My retirement pay is higher than that.

Why would anyone with such skills move to the Philippines to work for so little pay… 

I think that went straight over your head! 

Maybe you shoukd follow the content of the topic a tiny weeny better and read the thread...we are not talkimg about salary here...

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Salty Dog

I give up. Maybe someone else can explain… :unknw:

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HeyMike

My abacus worked fine when I was a young whipper snapper, and it works just as well today.... and it never had an upgrade. High tech... bah...

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Paddy

 

6 hours ago, Cgu said:

But do not bother if you do not have these skills..

“Passion in software development, but get even more satisfaction having left hands-on work behind to focus on helping your team do great work and improve their skill set.

Strong organisational and change management skills with demonstrated ability to prioritise.

Able to take High level of responsibility and able to make good leadership decisions based on an excellent understanding of business requirements.“

How long do you think you will have the required technical skills (in an ever changing environment) if you took this job (the second one listed)? My bolding of the requirement.

And, yes, I can claim a couple of the technical skills. No problem with the additional requirements listed. 
 

You may have all of the technical skills required, but if you cannot work with the (inexperienced youngster and unlearned new skill but experienced oldster) colleagues you get and upon whom you depend to get it right, I doubt success will be just around the corner.

Good luck with your career. The next time a group of outsourced wizard programmers trash my bank’s systems such that I can’t access my accounts, I’ll think of you. 

PS. When the bank’s systems are trashed next, it will be modern implementations of ancient concepts that save the day- backups, restore points, solid transaction management etc.

Edited by Paddy
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