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Dafey

Why is there a leap day?

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Dafey

 

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At some point in elementary school, your science teacher probably explained to you that there are 365 days in a year because that’s how long it takes for Earth to complete one full rotation around the sun. What they might not have specified, however, is that it’s not exactly 365 days—it’s actually closer to 365.2421 days.

So, if we want our calendar year to begin right when Earth begins a new rotation around the sun, we have to account for (roughly) an extra quarter of a day each year, or one day every four years. History.com reports that the Egyptians had already been doing this for a while before Europe finally caught on in 46 B.C.E., when Roman dictator Julius Caesar and astronomer Sosigenes put their heads together to come up with what we now call the Julian calendar, which includes 12 months, 365 days, and an additional “leap day” every four years on February 29.

But rounding 0.2421 up to 0.25 each year created an issue, because it didn’t quite add up to a full day every four years—and that tiny discrepancy meant that after 128 years, the calendar year ended up starting a day before Earth had completed its rotation around the sun. By the 14th century, the calendar year was starting a whopping 10 days before Earth finished its orbit.

In 1582, Pope Gregory XIII sought to correct the error by suggesting that we simply skip a leap day every so often. His Gregorian calendar, which we still use today, mandates that we omit the leap day during years evenly divisible by 100 but not by 400. For instance, the year 2000 included a leap day because it’s divisible by 100 and 400; the year 2100, on the other hand, will not include a leap day, since it’s evenly divisible by 100, but not by 400.

Gregory XIII’s correction to Caesar’s overcorrection is itself a bit of an under-correction, so we’ll probably need to reevaluate our leap day protocol again in about 10,000 years.

https://www.msn.com/en-ph/lifestyle/lifestyle-buzz/why-is-there-a-leap-day/ar-BBZWteF?ocid=spartandhp

 

 

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SkyMan

The bigger question is why does February only have 28 days to begin with? What ftard came up with that idea?

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Paddy
2 hours ago, SkyMan said:

The bigger question is why does February only have 28 days to begin with? What ftard came up with that idea?

Cos it’s winter. You don’t get to be so cold for so long...

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SkyMan
1 hour ago, Paddy said:

Cos it’s winter. You don’t get to be so cold for so long...

But then Dec, Jan, and Mar have 31 days.  Share the wealth.  There should only be 5 31 day months with 6 in a leap year.

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Headshot
7 hours ago, SkyMan said:

The bigger question is why does February only have 28 days to begin with? What ftard came up with that idea?

You can blame the Emperor Augustus Caesar for that one. He thought that the month named after him should have as many days as the month named after Julius Caesar, so he stole a day from February to give to August. The reason August is where it is in the calendar is that Augustus followed Julius in life.

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SkyMan
1 minute ago, Headshot said:

You can blame the Emperor Augustus Caesar for that one. He thought that the month named after him should have as many days as the month named after Julius Caesar, so he stole a day from February to give to August. The reason August is where it is in the calendar is that Augustus followed Julius in life.

Well, there's 2 days  missing.  And why from February instead of January or March?

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Dafey
34 minutes ago, Headshot said:

You can blame the Emperor Augustus Caesar for that one

Good thing it wasn't Nero...might have burned the calendar!

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Headshot

Most of the months were named after Roman gods, so Augustus couldn't steal from another god. February is, however, named after a festival, so stealing from that month was acceptable. Originally, the Julian calendar had alternating months with 31 and 30 days in them. Augustus messed that up, which is why October and December now have 31 days instead of September and November. Before Augustus renamed it, August was known as Sextilis, which simply means sixth month in Latin. It was the sixth month in the ancient Roman calendar before the Julian calendar was adopted. February was the last (and also the least favored) month in that calendar.

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wondersailor

The answer is very simple. So I can have a birthday. Without it I would birthdayless. Yup, it's all about me!

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SkyMan
2 hours ago, wondersailor said:

The answer is very simple. So I can have a birthday. Without it I would birthdayless. Yup, it's all about me!

If you don't have birthdays you don't get older. Sup to you.

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wondersailor

That's ok. I am only 1/4 as old as everyone else each year.

2 hours ago, SkyMan said:

If you don't have birthdays you don't get older. Sup to you.

 

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RR3

Chinese calendar always accurate, much older than western which is always wrong.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_calendar

Europe did not understand zero, learned later from India, so AD 1 is where they started  the year count.

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There is no year zero in this scheme, so the year AD 1 immediately follows the year 1 BC. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anno_Domini

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Paddy

Is there truly any aspect of our everyday lives where an accurate calendar or the use of a year 0 actually matters?

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lamoe
12 minutes ago, Paddy said:

Is there truly any aspect of our everyday lives where an accurate calendar or the use of a year 0 actually matters?

Year 0 - no

Accurate yes - otherwise  temp on Dec 25 in Chicago US could be 90F :rolleyes:

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