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lamoe

Mosquito tracking laser to zap them in near future?

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lamoe

 

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https://newatlas.com/around-the-home/bzigo-tracks-mosquitoes/

It's definitely annoying when you're trying to swat a mosquito that's flying around a room, but you lose track of where it is. Bzigo is designed to help, as it optically-tracks mozzies and then highlights them with an eye-safe laser.

Developed by an Israeli startup of the same name, Bzigo incorporates an infrared LED, an HD wide-angle infrared camera, and a microprocessor. Utilizing computer vision algorithms running on the latter, it's reportedly able to differentiate between mosquitos and other pixel-sized airborne objects (such as dust particles) based on their movement patterns. It even works in the dark.

Once Bzigo detects that a mosquito is in the room, it notifies the user via an app on their smartphone. To help them see where the insect is, the device laser-projects a box around it, whenever it stops moving. It's then up to the user to do the actually swatting, although a future version of the product may be able to "autonomously eliminate" mosquitoes after they've been detected.

Bzigo founders Nadav Benedek (left) and Saar Wilf, with the present version of their device

The current prototype, which was unveiled this week at CES in Las Vegas, is reportedly capable of sighting mosquitoes up to a distance of 8 meters (26 feet). It's intended for indoor use only.

Should you be interested in getting one, you can reserve a unit by placing a US$9 deposit via the first link below. Doing so will get backers a $30 discount on the planned $169 retail price. The company is currently in talks with investors, with hopes of having Bzigo on the market sometime early next year.

Source: Bzigo via IEEE Spectrum

 

 

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Paddy

You could probably get a nice mosquito net for less than $169. No middle of the night alarms on your phone either!

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lamoe
16 minutes ago, Paddy said:

You could probably get a nice mosquito net for less than $169. No middle of the night alarms on your phone either!

True but like any new consumer gadget if successful price will come down and then Chinese will make a knockoff.

Look at cellphones $4,000 in 1983 ($10,000 today) and $1/ min phone charges

 

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Kahuna
1 hour ago, lamoe said:

although a future version of the product may be able to "autonomously eliminate" mosquitoes after they've been detected.

Using lasers to tag the skeeter...ok    :unsure:

What is an "eye safe laser"?    :scratch_head:

If they are going to make the"eye safe laser" power up to "autonomously eliminate" mosquitoes after they've been detected that would be cool but really unsafe.  Maybe they should use rail-guns shooting BB's instead  :)     :wink:

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Kahuna
28 minutes ago, lamoe said:

Look at cellphones $4,000 in 1983 ($10,000 today) and $1/ min phone charges

Walmart selling those $10,000 phones now? :shocked:    I'm keeping my old flip phone  if they are..:unsure:

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SkyMan
52 minutes ago, Paddy said:

No middle of the night alarms on your phone either!

Use the Quiet Hours setting on your phone.

1 hour ago, lamoe said:

a future version of the product may be able to "autonomously eliminate" mosquitoes after they've been detected.

Get that working and I'm interested.  Also include flies/wasps.  Then I'll mount it on a Roomba. for whole house coverage.

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Jawny

Ive been using a gadget for years that works well for mosquitoes.  It uses some simple technology, but is more effective than a fly flap. 
these are commercially available, and prices vary between retailers.  
 

It used a compression technology and micro sized particles. The particles are ejected only as needed.  The device dispenses the particles which can catch the mosquitoes in mid flight or while resting.  

Be sure to ask for the "dengue killer" type.  Brand name is Baygon. 

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SkyMan
5 minutes ago, Jawny said:

Brand name is Baygon.

Some might prefer not spraying poison around their house.  But if you're ok with that, Bayer Advanced Odorless is better.

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lamoe
52 minutes ago, Kahuna said:

Walmart selling those $10,000 phones now? :shocked:    I'm keeping my old flip phone  if they are..:unsure:

In today's money - inflation   Remember only our top line salesmen had them

Dual lasers with target identification?

"Lasers with emission wavelengths longer than ≈ 1.4 μm are often called “eye-safe”, because light in that wavelength range is strongly absorbed in the eye's cornea and lens and therefore cannot reach the significantly more sensitive retina. ... Another class of eye-safe laser sources are optical parametric oscillators."

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Kahuna
17 minutes ago, lamoe said:

Dual lasers with target identification?

"Lasers with emission wavelengths longer than ≈ 1.4 μm are often called “eye-safe”, because light in that wavelength range is strongly absorbed in the eye's cornea and lens and therefore cannot reach the significantly more sensitive retina. ... Another class of eye-safe laser sources are optical parametric oscillators."

https://www.rp-photonics.com/eye_safe_lasers.html

Quote

Eye-safe Lasers

 

Definition: lasers emitting in a wavelength region with relatively low hazards for the human eye

German: augensichere Laser

Category: lasers

How to cite the article; suggest additional literature

Author: Dr. Rüdiger Paschotta

Lasers with emission wavelengths longer than ≈ 1.4 μm are often called “eye-safe”, because light in that wavelength range is strongly absorbed in the eye's cornea and lens and therefore cannot reach the significantly more sensitive retina. This makes e.g. erbium lasers and erbium-doped fiber amplifiers used in 1.5-μm telecom systems or 2-μm thulium lasers far less dangerous than e.g. 1-μm lasers with similar output powers. Another class of eye-safe laser sources are optical parametric oscillators.

On the other hand, the absorption length of the cornea reaches very small values (well below 0.1 mm) at longer wavelengths, particularly around 3 μm and around 10 μm (near the wavelength of CO2 lasers). This means that optical pulses at such wavelengths are absorbed in a very thin layer, so that the cornea can easily be damaged. Therefore, lasers emitting around 3 μm or 10 μm are less eye-safe than e.g. lasers emitting around 1.5 μm, even though they are “retina-safe”. While the outer surface of the cornea (the epithelium) can at least heal within a couple of days after damage, this is not the case for the inner part (the endothelium). Also, corneal injuries can be very painful.

Obviously, the quality “eye-safe” depends not only on the emission wavelength, but also on the power level and the optical intensity which can reach the eye. With sufficient power, such as is reached with a fiber amplifier or with a Q-switched laser, the eye can still be damaged. However, it can already be very helpful if at least weak parasitic reflections of some main beam are not dangerous for the eyes.

Note that the laser power alone (or the intensity at the laser output) is not sufficient to assess the possible intensity in the eye; that also depends on other factors such as the beam divergence and beam quality. Therefore, one cannot simply state a power or intensity limit for eye safety at a given wavelength.

Applications of Eye-Safe Lasers

Eye-safe lasers are particularly important in application cases where light needs to be transmitted over substantial distances in open air. Examples are laser rangefinders and free-space optical communications.

The term eye safe laser is a relative term it seems.

They too can be damaging if abused or mishandled.

There is no such thing as a laser you can truly label "eye safe" given how sensitive eyes are.  

If a skeeter lands on your nose and that tracker finds it, there may be a problem vision wise afterwards.  Just my opinion.. with a dose of common sense..

Edited by Kahuna
punctuation

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lamoe
1 hour ago, Kahuna said:

https://www.rp-photonics.com/eye_safe_lasers.html

The term eye safe laser is a relative term it seems.

They too can be damaging if abused or mishandled.

There is no such thing as a laser you can truly label "eye safe" given how sensitive eyes are.  

If a skeeter lands on your nose and that tracker finds it, there may be a problem vision wise afterwards.  Just my opinion.. with a dose of common sense..

I would imagine there would be IFF software for close encounters of the itchy kind to preclude that

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