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Australia standard voltage is 230V and is compatible to the Philippine 220V. I have found that an advantage when I bring appliances into the Philippines from Australia. No voltage regulators required.

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4 minutes ago, Jack Rat said:

Australia standard voltage is 230V and is compatible to the Philippine 220V. I have found that an advantage when I bring appliances into the Philippines from Australia. No voltage regulators required.

220v in Philippines ???

just checked my veco meter, it shows 238v

as can see below residential customer 240 volt

image.png.1a487f94b4f53ce9075c09942c5d87a6.png

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shadow
6 minutes ago, Woolf said:

220v in Philippines ???

just checked my veco meter, it shows 238v

as can see below residential customer 240 volt

image.png.1a487f94b4f53ce9075c09942c5d87a6.png

Mine varies between 200 and 220.

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Kabisay-an gid
48 minutes ago, Jack Rat said:

Australia standard voltage is 230V and is compatible to the Philippine 220V. I have found that an advantage when I bring appliances into the Philippines from Australia. No voltage regulators required.

 

The frequency standards are different though, 50hz in Oz and 60hz in Phils. So as you well know, that will cause compatibility problems with some appliances/devices, not all.

 

36 minutes ago, Woolf said:

220v in Philippines ???

just checked my veco meter, it shows 238v

as can see below residential customer 240 volt

 

220v is the standard, of course it's going to vary somewhat by location.

 

 

.

Edited by Kabisay-an gid
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13 minutes ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

 

The frequency standards are different though, 50hz in Oz and 60hz in Phils. So as you well know, that will cause compatibility problems with some appliances/devices, not all.

 

 

220v is the standard, of course it's going to vary somewhat by location.

 

 

.

OOOOOHHHHHHH  it is  ???????????

 

image.thumb.png.318680b660a4d4a5e3d89598add54335.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country

image.png

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48 minutes ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

 

The frequency standards are different though, 50hz in Oz and 60hz in Phils. So as you well know, that will cause compatibility problems with some appliances/devices, not all.

 

 

220v is the standard, of course it's going to vary somewhat by location.

 

 

.

Over the past 20 years I have never had a problem with appliances I have brought in from Australia. I Just plug the appliance in and switch on, all good so far!

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Kabisay-an gid
21 minutes ago, Woolf said:

OOOOOHHHHHHH  it is  ???????????

 

image.thumb.png.318680b660a4d4a5e3d89598add54335.png

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country

image.png

 

I never realized Wikipedia was considered a credible/serious reference source, but then I've never lived in Denmark, where it appears to be! :lol:

 

https://world-power-plugs.com/philippines

Electricity in Philippines - voltage and frequency

All power sockets in Philippines provide a standard voltage of 220V with a standard frequency of 60Hz.

You can use all your equipment in Philippines if the outlet voltage in your own country is between 220V-240V. This is the case in most of Europe, Australia, the United Kingdom and most countries in Africa and Asia.

If the standard voltage in your country is in the range of 100V-127V (which is most common in the US, Canada and countries in South America) you might need a voltage converter in Philippines.

The standard frequency in Philippines is 60Hz. If this frequency differs from the frequency used in your home country, please use caution when plugging in your devices. Check the small print on the device to see if the device can handle the frequency. Please note we regularly check our electricity information with the International Electrotechnical Committee (IEC).

Small print on the device or power adapter indicates what voltages the device can work with. If you see 100-240V 50/60Hz printed, the adapter is rated to work on all voltages used worldwide. Please note that power plug adapters only convert plug types and do not convert voltages.

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41 minutes ago, Kabisay-an gid said:

I never realized Wikipedia was considered a credible/serious reference source, but then I've never lived in Denmark, where it appears to be! :lol:

 

so you trust world-power-plugs.com more than wikipedia ??

try take the link I provided and look at 39

Quote

39.  Philippine Electrical Code, section 2.20.1.5 (a)

 

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found it

https://filipinoengineer.com/wiki/Philippine_Electrical_Code_Part_1/Chapter_2._Wiring_and_Protection/Article_2.20_-_Branch-Circuit,_Feeder,_And_Service_Calculations

Quote

 

2.20.1.5 Calculations.

(a) Voltages. Unless other voltages are specified, for purposes of calculating branch-circuit and feeder loads, nominal system voltages of 115, 115/230, 208Y/120, 230, 347, 400Y/230, 460Y/265, 460, 600Y/347, and 600 volts shall be used.

(b) Fractions of an Ampere. Where calculations result in a fraction of an ampere that is less than 0.5, such fractions shall be permitted to be dropped.

 

Notice that 220 is NOT mentioned

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SkyMan
20 hours ago, Jack Rat said:

Over the past 20 years I have never had a problem with appliances I have brought in from Australia. I Just plug the appliance in and switch on, all good so far!

You may have some problems with motors running faster than designed and shortening their life.  Or they may have been designed to handle the higher frequency.

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SkyMan
20 hours ago, cookie47 said:

What I think is a failing aspect of Philippines 3 pin outlets/receptacles,, (compared to British /Australia Singapore/ is that they don't have a safety shutter system that covers the live and neutral holes until the earth is pin inserted (which is a little longer to allow the shutter to open..... (I stand to be corrected if they are available).Thus anything can be poked into the live hole,,, (admitted Veco is "only"115v per leg) but enough to kill a child with poking a knitting needle or suchlike... Maybe us People with British/Australian heritage are just too darn paranoid with safety (but is that a bad thing) i just don't know..
 

Most outlets here don't have 3 pins and on those that do, it's unlikely the ground is connected to anything.  120v won't kill a kid, but the kid will learn about electricity.  You can poke a knitting needle in with no problem unless you're grounded.  When I was a kid I'd plug something in with my finger between the prongs.  I learned about electricity, once.

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33 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Most outlets here don't have 3 pins and on those that do, it's unlikely the ground is connected to anything.  120v won't kill a kid, but the kid will learn about electricity.  You can poke a knitting needle in with no problem unless you're grounded.  When I was a kid I'd plug something in with my finger between the prongs.  I learned about electricity, once.

The townhouse I rente in Duljo/Fatima a few years back, had 3 pin outlets and the ground WAS connected

If the kid is on a concrete floor and touches the 110/120 volt, that could kill him/her, likely?  maybe not

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Headshot
49 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Most outlets here don't have 3 pins and on those that do, it's unlikely the ground is connected to anything.  120v won't kill a kid, but the kid will learn about electricity.  You can poke a knitting needle in with no problem unless you're grounded.  When I was a kid I'd plug something in with my finger between the prongs.  I learned about electricity, once.

It takes two contact points, at different potentials, for electricity to flow through your body. Most common is one contact point with line voltage (whatever that is) and one contact point with ground potential (where you are standing). At lower voltages, volts don't kill. Amps do. A child can die from 120 volts just like they can die from 240 volts, if they get tangled up in it (not just a momentary contact). It simply depends on how much amperage they receive, and the longer they are hung up, the more amps they will likely receive.

If you really contact a conductor energized at 110 volts up to 600 volts, while in contact with ground, the voltage will cause your muscles to contract, so that if your hand is in solid contact, your fingers might wrap around the conductor, providing an even better path for the electricity to flow through. Luckily, for most of us who have been shocked, the contact was such that our muscles contracted away from the conductor, rather than towards it, so the contact was only momentary (though anybody who has experienced an electrical shock, and survives, will likely remember it).

At higher voltages (say 12kv to 345kv), electricity vaporizes flesh instead of just causing it to contract, so long contacts are unlikely, but the vaporization is usually enough to kill, if the two contacts are across the body, since electricity will follow your blood vessels right through you heart, thus causing irreparable internal damage. If the two contact points are just across a hand, the hand will literally be blown apart. When I was a lineman, I saw a few cases where people came into contact with high voltage lines, and the results were never pretty.

Edited by Headshot
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Breaker Panel

Below picture of sub/slave breaker panel, to be installed in the extension to the house    "My office"

 

PHOTO_20191220_104714.jpg

Edited by Woolf
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RogerDuMond

When we did the extension on our home, CEBECO III required a separate meter and separate panel.

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