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Wall Switches for Appliances


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Just now, RogerDuMond said:

In 74 years, I have never seen an outlet in the U.S. that you plug anything into with a switch controlling the outlet.

Anytime I have seen a trash compactor or garbage disposal, they were hardwired with an inline switch, not plugged in to a separate outlet.

 

Depends on house location & builder (custom or not)

 BRs, LR, FR , workshop (separate dedicated circuit breaker), did

Our offices, kitchen, dining room, garages did not

Have had both hard wired and plugged in GDs

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Switched outlets in the US are common when those outlets typically have a lamp/light plugged into them; they turn on the lights. Otherwise, it’s for utilities like trash compactors (the outlet is belo

He was referring to this Australia UK

I live in the USA in a modern home and not a single one of my appliance has an on/off wall switch. That includes washer, dryer, refrigerator, freezer, range, oven, dishwasher, microwave, TVs, and comp

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cookie47
17 hours ago, SkyMan said:

house inspection

House Inspection papers (supplied by vendor) 

Found it. 

First rule of marriage,, Talk to wife 

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Headshot

I have switch/outlet combos in my kitchen. I had them in the US as well. The switches don't control power to the outlet. They control under-cabinet lights. The combo fixture is as commonly available in the US as they are here. How you wire them, and what the switch controls, is up to you. It is a waste of a box to have a switch (for lights or disposal or whatever) above your kitchen counters and not include an outlet in the box. Having a switch that controls an outlet in the same box would, however, also be a waste of space, but that isn't generally how these combo fixtures are used.

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RogerDuMond
1 hour ago, Headshot said:

I have switch/outlet combos in my kitchen. I had them in the US as well. The switches don't control power to the outlet. They control under-cabinet lights. The combo fixture is as commonly available in the US as they are here. How you wire them, and what the switch controls, is up to you. It is a waste of a box to have a switch (for lights or disposal or whatever) above your kitchen counters and not include an outlet in the box. Having a switch that controls an outlet in the same box would, however, also be a waste of space, but that isn't generally how these combo fixtures are used.

Sure, those exist, but it didn't seem to me that the OP was talking about those.

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Headshot
1 hour ago, RogerDuMond said:

Sure, those exist, but it didn't seem to me that the OP was talking about those.

It's OK. I can't fathom why anybody would see a need to disconnect appliances when they aren't being used anyway (either by using a switch or by unplugging them) unless it is something like a garbage disposal, where the switch is the only practical way to operate it, but then most garbage disposals are direct wired and don't plug into an outlet anyway (and even if they are plugged into an outlet, the outlet is under the sink and far away from the switch).

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Just now, Headshot said:

It's OK. I can't fathom why anybody would see a need to disconnect appliances when they aren't being used anyway (either by using a switch or by unplugging them) unless it is something like a garbage disposal, where the switch is the only practical way to operate it, but then most garbage disposals are direct wired and don't plug into an outlet anyway (and even if they are plugged into an outlet, the outlet is under the sink and far away from the switch).

"Ready" state computers, TV's,  should be unplugged if no other protection from power surges is provided.

Also A/C if on and refrig during storm - compressor protection

Had a guy play wack a mole  with power pole and blew out my TV - his insurance paid for a new one

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Salty Dog

Who knew when I spit this from another thread it would be so popular.

I recently returned from a week long cruise and the only thing I did when I left was set the aircon on a high temp, the hot water tank on a low temp and turned the hot tub off. I never even considered unplugging anything.

My electricity bill is really pretty low anyway.

I used 519 kWh this last month which cost me around P3600. That's for a 150 sqm house with central air. I would guess my largest usage of electricity is a small hot tub that keeps the temp of the water at 40 degrees celsius. 

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SkyMan
2 hours ago, lamoe said:

"Ready" state computers, TV's,  should be unplugged if no other protection from power surges is provided.

You're thinking if you're home and there's a power surge you can do something about it before it hits your stuff but if you're out of the house you better unplug them them?  

2 hours ago, lamoe said:

Also A/C if on and refrig during storm - compressor protection

It's up to anyone that wants to but I've never unplugged the ref except to defrost it.  Even when we go on vacation for over a month.  And we even had a lightning strike on the property within about 10ft from the corner of the carport so about 25ft from the house.  It burned a hole through buried GI pipe with my power lines in it.  Fried some wiring but no problem with the electronics.  The only thing I do for power is to switch off the power to my well pump when there is a blackout.  I don't know what might be happening to the power before and during VECO working to fix it so I wait until power is restored before I go switch the pump back on.

Remember that if you have VECO power and put a regular wall switch on the outlet, there is still one leg of 110V to the outlet.

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Just now, SkyMan said:

You're thinking if you're home and there's a power surge you can do something about it before it hits your stuff but if you're out of the house you better unplug them them?  

 

No - had some very bad lighting storms out in the boonies of Rockford - never lost power other than a few minor interruptions lasting maybe  1/2 hour and car taking out the pole but did lose several trees and a well pump

Tried to judge severity when home to determine if unplugging was required

If we knew we'd be gone during warning did unplug TV, Computers, fridge / freezer and trip well breaker

 

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to_dave007
On 12/16/2019 at 11:32 AM, Jack Rat said:

The majority of first world countries I have resided in have an appliance off-on switch located on the wall, makes sense.

ON/OFF switch for appliances on wall NOT common in Canada either.

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Kabisay-an gid
On 12/15/2019 at 10:32 PM, Jack Rat said:

The majority of first world countries I have resided in have an appliance off-on switch located on the wall, makes sense.

 

You obviously haven't resided in many first world countries.

Besides the UK, Australia and some Middle Eastern and minor Asian countries - few nations still use what you mentioned.

They're rare in the US, Canada, Europe, and major Asian countries like Japan and Korea etcetera.

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Just now, Kabisay-an gid said:

 

You obviously haven't resided in many first world countries.

Besides the UK, Australia and some Middle Eastern and minor Asian countries - few nations still use what you mentioned.

They're rare in the US, Canada, Europe, and major Asian countries like Japan and Korea etcetera.

Depends where in US

Here it's to turn on /  off ceiling fan -  hard wired true but same function - dual control

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Kabisay-an gid
8 hours ago, SkyMan said:

You're thinking if you're home and there's a power surge you can do something about it before it hits your stuff but if you're out of the house you better unplug them them?

 

The electrical outlets in my house all have built-in surge protection - they cut off instantly in case of a power surge. They've saved my appliances etcetera from lightning strikes numerous times.

They've been available for years, yet most people don't bother to have them installed. I guess they'd rather use the annoying wall strips with long cords laying about.

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Kabisay-an gid
2 minutes ago, lamoe said:

Depends where in US

Here it's to turn on /  off ceiling fan -  hard wired true but same function - dual control

 

I said RARE, which acknowledges that they are used in a few cases, but to nowhere near the extent that they're used in the UK, Australia etcetera.

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Just now, Kabisay-an gid said:

 

I said RARE, which acknowledges that they are used in a few cases, but to nowhere near the extent that they're used in the UK, Australia etcetera.

I agree - that's why I said depends where

Never had until moved into last house - once got accustomed to them appreciated being able to turn on lights from doorway - floor lamps mainly

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