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Wall Switches for Appliances


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46 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

I thought you said you lived in a first world country... :lol:

How many switches do you need to flip… 

Actually I have all of my audio gear in the lounge and appliances in the kitchen connected to a surge filters, so when I go to bed I simply flick the switch off on both units, two switches and peace of mind, and too boot I sleep like a baby! 

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Switched outlets in the US are common when those outlets typically have a lamp/light plugged into them; they turn on the lights. Otherwise, it’s for utilities like trash compactors (the outlet is belo

He was referring to this Australia UK

I live in the USA in a modern home and not a single one of my appliance has an on/off wall switch. That includes washer, dryer, refrigerator, freezer, range, oven, dishwasher, microwave, TVs, and comp

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1 hour ago, shadow said:

Each connection, and each switch you put in a circuit, increases the risk of a bad connection and heat created by it. 

Now I remember ?

I think that is why switched outlets were abandoned in Denmark

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cookie47

Don't worry about it Jack.... 

Yah can't teach an old DOG.... new tricks. 

Even if they are ELECT TRICKS. :rolleyes:

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House in US dual outlet wall sockets in living areas other than kitchen  had separate outlet wiring - one continuous on - the other on demand from wall switch

In kitchen &  CRs could trip GFIC test to shut off appliances

AC had dedicated breaker and on unit switches  - fan / compressor

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HongKongPhooey

Switched outlets in the US are common when those outlets typically have a lamp/light plugged into them; they turn on the lights. Otherwise, it’s for utilities like trash compactors (the outlet is below the sink) that you obviously want to be turned on/off for a short term specific purpose. In Hong Kong, the instantaneous water heaters for showers are switched outlets which I never shut off, but our domestic helper has a bad habit of doing it. After a few times of me walking out naked yelling to flip the switch, I was onto her scheme...

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6 hours ago, HongKongPhooey said:

Switched outlets in the US are common when those outlets typically have a lamp/light plugged into them; they turn on the lights. Otherwise, it’s for utilities like trash compactors (the outlet is below the sink) that you obviously want to be turned on/off for a short term specific purpose. In Hong Kong, the instantaneous water heaters for showers are switched outlets which I never shut off, but our domestic helper has a bad habit of doing it. After a few times of me walking out naked yelling to flip the switch, I was onto her scheme...

Yep about the floor / table lamps & GD

Since they have neither here not needed?:rolleyes:

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I have several floor lamps in my home.  All have eith a floor level switch (foot press) or one on the lamp.  As well, we have multiple table and desk lamps, all using built in switches. Pretty common form of lighting. 

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SkyMan
23 hours ago, HongKongPhooey said:

Switched outlets in the US are common when those outlets typically have a lamp/light plugged into them; they turn on the lights.

There was a time period when that was common as contractors were trying to save few bucks by not installing ceiling outlets/lighting.  It was not popular and they've gone away from that particularly with the popularity of ceiling fans.  

 

On 12/16/2019 at 11:44 AM, Jack Rat said:

Because why have to pull the plug every time you want to disconnect the power from the appliance. Then one has to fumble around plugging in the appliance again, it makes more sense to just flick the switch.

If you have VECO power and use a typical switch, there is still 110v going to the appliance.

On 12/16/2019 at 9:47 AM, Jack Rat said:

I have never got my head around the fact that the majority of homes here have not got a simple on-off switch on the wall to turn off appliances. 

If someone really wanted that it would greatly increase the cost of the house inspection as they charge by the receptacle which is why most rooms only have 1 outlet. 

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cookie47
7 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

house inspection

Can you clarify inspection please. 

I was on site when Veco connected the main from the pole and installed meter. One of the two linesmen just flicked all the fuses and the lights came on. See ya,, Unless your referring  to some building inspector. 

Re: switched receptacles. I was bought up with them both in UK and Australia and do like them, but i think its more of cultural thingy. There's pages of opinion on Quora that would do your head in with opinions on the reasons why. 

 

 

 

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SkyMan
3 minutes ago, cookie47 said:

Unless your referring  to some building inspector. 

Yes.  Part of the requirement for the certificate of occupancy.  Although I'm not sure how valuable that is.

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cookie47
4 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

Yes.  Part of the requirement for the certificate of occupancy.  Although I'm not sure how valuable that is.

Mmm, Well I don't know of an inspection taking place prior to power, or after power. There was a builders representative on site to give us keys (a lady). Anyway not to worry unless we were obliged to have a copy. Ill ask the Mrs tomorrow,, (gone to bed). 

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SkyMan
8 hours ago, cookie47 said:

Mmm, Well I don't know of an inspection taking place prior to power, or after power. There was a builders representative on site to give us keys (a lady). Anyway not to worry unless we were obliged to have a copy. Ill ask the Mrs tomorrow,, (gone to bed). 

Might be different rules for subdivisions or in Lacion.

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cookie47

 

@Jack Rat

I read pages of opinions on Quora regarding switched receptacles. Some say pulling a non switched appliance (if the appliance is "on" caused arcing and wear to the inner prongs? Any how I'm not going to get into a Bun fight. 

The opinions are vast but a theme was apparent. Which was rather funny. 

After Britain having had switched receptacles since day one , some years ago non switched receptacles started to appear on shop shelves. Probably due to being readily available and used in the EU. But the British said No no no we want our switched receptacles and thus they returned to the shelves. (Story from quora) how true?? 

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RogerDuMond
On 12/16/2019 at 9:10 PM, HongKongPhooey said:

Switched outlets in the US are common when those outlets typically have a lamp/light plugged into them;

In 74 years, I have never seen an outlet in the U.S. that you plug anything into with a switch controlling the outlet.

On 12/16/2019 at 9:10 PM, HongKongPhooey said:

Otherwise, it’s for utilities like trash compactors (the outlet is below the sink) that you obviously want to be turned on/off for a short term specific purpose.

Anytime I have seen a trash compactor or garbage disposal, they were hardwired with an inline switch, not plugged in to a separate outlet.

16 hours ago, cookie47 said:

I was on site when Veco connected the main from the pole and installed meter. One of the two linesmen just flicked all the fuses and the lights came on. See ya,, Unless your referring  to some building inspector. 

I don't know about VECO, but out here in the province, CEBECO III requires that they do an electrical inspection of the whole building before they will authorize a linesman to visit and turn on the power to the building.

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cookie47
I don't know about VECO, but out here in the province, CEBECO III requires that they do an electrical inspection of the whole building before they will authorize a linesman to visit and turn on the power to the building.
Yes certainly would agree, I just was not in a position to conclude IF it was done or not. Certainly nothing of significance whilst linesmen connected power.. We were allowed (by the vendor/builder ) to occupy our house 2 days before Veco connected power as their connection schedule did not fit into our personal circumstances. Anyway not to worry, this was 18 months ago, It only got mentioned because of Skymans comments.

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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