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foreverlost

Language issues

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foreverlost

Does anyone have recommendations for how to handle language issues for  young kids (age 2-7) who are primary English speakers when moving to the Cebu area? Is there a good way to accelerate their familiarity with Visayan language? Thanks.

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shadow
1 hour ago, foreverlost said:

Does anyone have recommendations for how to handle language issues for  young kids (age 2-7) who are primary English speakers when moving to the Cebu area? Is there a good way to accelerate their familiarity with Visayan language? Thanks.

Turn them loose to play with the barrio children, kids pick up languages very fast!

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Salty Dog
9 minutes ago, shadow said:

Turn them loose to play with the barrio children, kids pick up languages very fast!

Like tae, titi, puki, and magkantot...:biggrin_01:

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Headshot
4 hours ago, shadow said:

Turn them loose to play with the barrio children, kids pick up languages very fast!

Well, maybe not turn young children loose (unless you want them to be kidnapped), but encourage them to make friends with the other children in the neighborhood and at school (and invite those children to play at your house). Of course, you need to make sure that you are never alone with those children. I generally stay in a different room when my daughter has friends over. Young children do pick up languages fairly quickly. My sister-in-law and my nephew (SIL's son) live with us, and they speak primarily Bisayan to my daughter. She picked it right up at a very early age. However, she had very little contact with Filipino (Tagalog) until she started school, so she has struggled a bit with it. Most kids here pick up Filipino from watching local TV, which is seldom on in my house.

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shadow
39 minutes ago, Headshot said:

Well, maybe not turn young children loose (unless you want them to be kidnapped), but encourage them to make friends with the other children in the neighborhood and at school (and invite those children to play at your house). Of course, you need to make sure that you are never alone with those children. I generally stay in a different room when my daughter has friends over. Young children do pick up languages fairly quickly. My sister-in-law and my nephew (SIL's son) live with us, and they speak primarily Bisayan to my daughter. She picked it right up at a very early age. However, she had very little contact with Filipino (Tagalog) until she started school, so she has struggled a bit with it. Most kids here pick up Filipino from watching local TV, which is seldom on in my house.

Oh I don't know. I was turned loose at a very young age...

 

And look how THAT turned out!

 

:lol:

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Paddy

As has been said, let them interact with (appropriate) kids in your neighborhood and have local TV on regularly. Mind you, it seems most of the satellite/cable tv stuff for young kids is in English anyway. 
 

Additionally, engage the services of a local nanny and instruct her to speak to the children only in Cebuano (or Tagalog, or both, your choice). You continue to speak to them only in English. Even the 7 year old should end up bilingual. 

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Headshot
6 hours ago, shadow said:

Oh I don't know. I was turned loose at a very young age...

And look how THAT turned out!

:lol:

See? I told you.

Seriously, we grew up in a time when the world was mostly safe for children, and kids could be "let loose" to play without too many dire consequences. That world doesn't exist in many places as much anymore. There are a lot of really bad people out there.

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shadow
1 minute ago, Headshot said:

See? I told you.

Seriously, we grew up in a time when the world was mostly safe for children, and kids could be "let loose" to play without too many dire consequences. That world doesn't exist in many places as much anymore. There are a lot of really bad people out there.

Yeah, and probably most of them were turned loose at a very young age!

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Paddy

Touché

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foreverlost

I will try what was mentioned on this thread - I was already planning to encourage them to interact with other kids. Having a nanny speak only Visayan is a good idea!

We have a relative who sends his kid to a private school where only English is allowed. The last time I visited him he mentioned that the neighborhood kids don't play with his kid because he can't speak Visayan. Btw, this is a 100% Filipino family but they speak only English at home to teach their kids English. It seems that too much English has sort of isolate their kids from the neighborhood kids. I want to try to help my kids assimilate more quickly so I was hoping to somehow accelerate their learning of Visayan.

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Paddy

My experience in this comes from watching the children of immigrant families in Toronto. Obviously, outside the home in Toronto, it’s English. Those families who persisted in their native language at home, tended to raise fully bilingual children who were equally happy with other Canadian kids at school etc. as well as the kids of their own ethnic group. 
In mixed marriages, if English was also spoken at home, the children had trouble with the “other” language. 
 

I believe it is important for you to set up two, reasonably equal, language environments and be disciplined about maintaining them. Your 7 yr old will probably have the most initial difficulty but even that’s not too old to benefit fully. 
 

Some children will naturally make friends easily and some won’t - no matter what the language - but that’s a different problem. I would encourage your elder child to participate in local activities (dance etc) so they are seen by others to be doing the same sorts of things. The younger one should grow into it naturally. 
 

 

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Headshot
36 minutes ago, foreverlost said:

I will try what was mentioned on this thread - I was already planning to encourage them to interact with other kids. Having a nanny speak only Visayan is a good idea!

We have a relative who sends his kid to a private school where only English is allowed. The last time I visited him he mentioned that the neighborhood kids don't play with his kid because he can't speak Visayan. Btw, this is a 100% Filipino family but they speak only English at home to teach their kids English. It seems that too much English has sort of isolate their kids from the neighborhood kids. I want to try to help my kids assimilate more quickly so I was hoping to somehow accelerate their learning of Visayan.

If you have a domestic helper in your home, it is easy to expose your children to Bisayan (Visayan refers to the islands in the center of the Philippines. Bisayan refers to the language that 28% of all Filipinos speak as their mother tongue). In our case, my sister-in-law is our domestic helper, and she speaks mostly Bisayan (except to me). Her son also speaks mostly Bisayan. From that, our daughter has learned Bisayan very easily. However, they still have a mother tongue class in her school (Ateneo), which allows her to learn the fine points of the language. You have to remember that Bisayan is not a very organized language, with several dialects (Cebuano is one), and many ways to spell and pronounce words, so getting trained from a single source is not likely to give much comprehension of the language.

If you want you children to learn the local languages, then you should send your children to a school where those languages are at least taught.

Edited by Headshot
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