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8 hours ago, Headshot said:

Having a decent credit card from a western bank is a personal choice, but I know that having one has kept me out of the soup on numerous occasions. If you don't feel comfortable having a credit card, then you get to live with the consequences, such as needing a large amount of money immediately available to you in the Philippines (a million pesos is between 19k and 20k USD currently). That does not mean having it in a Philippine bank ... because it may take days to access money from a Philippine bank when your only choices are pay now or not receive care in an emergency health situation. I don't like having that much cash on-hand. Personally, I can't imagine trying to live here without at least one credit card. You would be putting your life at risk.

Some banks have programs that provide for emergency credit card limits above normal levels, usually at highest rates

I understand the following is not available to everyone - was informed of it when discussed with bank my moving here. Reoccurring transactions out of country - until I got smart and opened Schwab account.

Changed to  a rather low limit single transaction and monthly cutoff  and required verification - safeguard against identity theft - with provisions for much higher if needed  - to be assessed at prevailing home improvement loan rates (took prearrangement allowing them to put lean against trust fund as collateral).

BTW - the trust fund was funded by ex-wife and I, not a deceased relative. Don't need millions to do it.

Edited by lamoe
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Having a decent credit card from a western bank is a personal choice, but I know that having one has kept me out of the soup on numerous occasions. If you don't feel comfortable having a credit card,

Maybe this was missed the first time he said it...

Easier said then done. but your right I guess. It's just who can afford the very high prices the insurance companies charge? If I'm right, most guys are retiring in the Philippines because their pensi

On 10/16/2019 at 7:39 PM, Jawny said:

I’d suggest that in addition to Phil health coverage while here, a reserve of around one million pesos is not unreasonable.

Man, that's a huge chunk of money, I wonder how many expats have that kind of cash saved up these days?

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Dafey
On 10/16/2019 at 6:50 AM, rrider said:

I am planning on moving to Cebu permanently in the near future, and visiting family and friends here in Canada once a year for a couple of three months or so. When I do this I will lose my medical insurance here in Canada

If you maintain a physical address in Canada can you an your wife still qualify for national insurance? 

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Without a generous and responsive insurance carrier, it can be a serious issue to cover unplanned medical issues.  Even though the Philippines has less expensive medical care than in other countries, the bill can accumulate rather quickly.  I’m referring primarily to major ailments like heart surgery, etc.  Philhealth will cover some, but not all of these larger bills.  Unfortunately, most westerners will opt for a private room, and that will result in some very strict rules being applied to the patient regarding their bill settlement. In effect, pay, before you leave.  

To overcome this, a promissory note can be used, but that will require collateral.  Alternatively, a co-signer can be used and thus the patient is released.  Along with medical records and such.

Cash is king.  This will allow the bill to be settled and insurance matters resolved later.

Of course, if the OP remains in his home country before the move here, a large balance credit card can be arranged for ahead of time.  
 

 

 

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http://bestphilippinesretirement.com/retireology/medical-insurance-and-health-care-information/medical-insurance-and-health-care-information-cost-comparisons-for-medical-procedures-philippines-vs-usa/
 

I realize this source may be off target about anticipated costs. However, I have seen similar summaries which reveal that costs here are less expensive than in other countries, but still costly for fixed income individuals.  

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3 hours ago, Dafey said:

If you maintain a physical address in Canada can you an your wife still qualify for national insurance? 

Not in Alberta Canada, You can only be outside the province for 6 months, 7 months to a year if you let them know in advance under certain circumstances. So we have to be physically in the provence for 6 months every year, if not we lose our medical, and it takes 3 months to get it again.

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RogerDuMond
On 10/16/2019 at 10:33 AM, Jawny said:

However, many people use Philheath. For foreigners the price is higher than for Filipinos.

 

On 10/16/2019 at 5:35 PM, Bama said:

Typically, you have to have an ACR card to sign up for PhilHealth.

You are not eligible on a BB stamp or a tourist visa, you have to be a permanent resident.

Philhealth only covers inpatient treatment, and there are some exceptions to treatment, things like cancer treatment are not covered. The policy pays 30% of inpatient treatment and at your age several hospitals will give you a senior discount without you asking. The policy will cost you 17,000 pesos per year. You have to have made 3 monthly payments within 6 months to use the policy, but you could make the payment a day or two before hospitalization to use the benefits. I know that for a fact.

Here is Philhealth's requirements.

PhilHealth coverage for foreigners and dual citizens

Foreigners and their qualified dependents can enjoy inpatient and outpatient benefits in any PhilHealth-accredited hospital or clinic in the Philippines. However, they cannot avail of the Z benefit packages and PhilHealth benefits for women who are about to give birth. They also cannot make reimbursement claims for hospital confinements abroad.
On the other hand, Pinoys with dual citizenship and their qualified dependents can have all PhilHealth benefits in accredited healthcare facilities nationwide and abroad. To qualify for benefits, they must pay at least 3 monthly PhilHealth contributions within 6 months before availment.

PhilHealth requirements for membership

For foreign retirees:

Registered with the Philippine Retirement Authority (PRA)

Accomplished PhilHealth Member Registration Form (PMRF) for Foreign Nationals that must be submitted to any PRA office

Special Resident Retiree’s Visa (SRRV)

Permanent residency status

For foreigners living or working in the Philippines:

Valid Alien Certificate of Registration Identity Card (ACR I-Card) issued by the Bureau of Immigration

Valid working permit

Accomplished PMRF for Foreign Nationals that must be submitted to any Local Health Insurance Office

For Filipinos with dual citizenship:

Accomplished PMRF

Certificate of Re-acquisition/Retention of Philippine Citizenship (CRPC)

Identification Certificate (IC) issued by the Philippine Embassy or Philippine Consulate abroad or by the Bureau of Immigration

Annual PhilHealth premium contributions

Foreign retirees: PHP 15,000

Expats: PHP 17,000

Dual citizens: PHP 3,600

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I'll let you know how it goes next year, as we'll be apply for Philhealth shortly after we arrive in January. BB privilege. wife is a dual citizen. also going to try and get my drivers licence. I'll let you know about that one to.

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RogerDuMond
9 minutes ago, rrider said:

I'll let you know how it goes next year, as we'll be apply for Philhealth shortly after we arrive in January. BB privilege. wife is a dual citizen. also going to try and get my drivers licence. I'll let you know about that one to.

I do not think that you qualify as a dependent of your wife, and even if you do, you may not qualify because of your age. You may have to get the 13A visa, and then avail of the foreign retirees Philhealth. You do need an ACR card to apply for Philhealth. After the initial cost of applying for the 13A, it only costs you 310 pesos per year, when you report to immigration in January or February.

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1 hour ago, RogerDuMond said:

not eligible on a BB stamp

Hmm, I am on a BB stamp and don’t have an ACR card and I am on my wife’s PhilHealth plan through her work. She showed me the email she sent to HR to set it up and I have a plastic Phil health card with my name on it. 

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RogerDuMond
11 minutes ago, user333 said:

Hmm, I am on a BB stamp and don’t have an ACR card and I am on my wife’s PhilHealth plan through her work. She showed me the email she sent to HR to set it up and I have a plastic Phil health card with my name on it. 

Not eligible to apply for Philhealth on a BB. Are you over 65, because I was told that you don't qualify as a dependent on Philhealth if you are over 65.

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to_dave007
1 hour ago, RogerDuMond said:

Not eligible to apply for Philhealth on a BB. Are you over 65, because I was told that you don't qualify as a dependent on Philhealth if you are over 65.

Didn't we have a quite extensive thread on this subject maybe a year ago..  at the time I think LINC member Tonny (whom I haven't seen for a while) brought us news that foreign citizens can't be covered as spouses under their Filipina wife's plan, and that foreigners ARE eligible to have their own independent Philhealth plan at premium cost of 17,000 annually...

 

https://www.livingincebuforums.com/topic/107548-phil-health-insurance-update/#comments

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1 hour ago, RogerDuMond said:

Not eligible to apply for Philhealth on a BB. Are you over 65, because I was told that you don't qualify as a dependent on Philhealth if you are over 65.

The qualification for expats joining Philhealth a couple of years ago was simply having an ACR card and qualified as a resident with a permanent billing address. Age or marital status were irrelevant.  The rules changed a couple of years ago with premiums for foreigners who had not already joined increasing substantially.

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cookie47
11 minutes ago, to_dave007 said:

and that foreigners ARE eligible to have their own independent Philhealth plan at premium cost of 17,000 annually...

Correct on most points (discussed extensively last year) but as been said by Roger,, not available if on a BB stamp, (might have been available in a previous Era).but not today. 

I've tried twice (different offices) and have been refused because during the form filling you need to supply your ACR. I card details.. 

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The need for an ACR to register may be a catch 22.  An ACR can be gotten by choosing to get a voluntary ACR. If I recall, the process means going to Manila.  That means a tourist can have an ACR card.  The catch 22 is that the card will show immigration status.  So, Philhealth may require the ACR card, but it may be the immigration status that is the deciding factor. 
 

as to the member of LinC who described being here in a balikbayan status but also being registered with Philhealth......I saw the term HR used to describe how the wife got the fellow registered.  That may be because a Human Resources office wants to get family members names, but not be concerned about other details.  Just guessing on my part.

 

 

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