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to_dave007

Laws Regarding Loud Music

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to_dave007

Anyone have any specific knowledge or experience about the laws here in the Philippines regarding loud music and karaoke and it's impact on neighbours.  Specifically interested in:

  •  Laws regarding volume and hours of operation.
  • The relative "weight" of Municipal ordinance vs Federal Law.
  • I am assuming that there is no provincial law on the subject..  but I may be wrong. 

Please lets not make this a thread about how pissed we can get at loud noise and inconsiderate behaviour.  W all agree on that already.  I'm specifically trying to understand the relevant law.

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Jawny

I’ve not heard of any national or provincial laws, but there are commonly Barangay rules.  If the music is loud and past certain hours, the Barangay tanod is usually involved to shut down the karaoke. I recall in our Barangay the cutoff was 9:00 pm. There may also be curfew hours in some  Barangays which lead to shut down hours.  . 

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Salty Dog

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Headshot

As far as I know, noise laws here are all either city, municipal or barangay ordinances. I don't believe that federal or provincial governments have ever involved themselves in regulation of noise. It is generally seen as a local matter. So, you might want to go talk with the barangay captain, if you have a problem with loud noises.

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Dafey

In our Barangay the cut off is 10PM...unless it's Fiesta...or you're a church...or you know somebody...etc.

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Headshot

Oh, and prepare for a :shitstormretarded: if you do complain to the barangay captain about one of your neighbors over loud karaoke (or whatever) at night. All of the other neighbors will come after you because you are trying to kill their culture ... or that you just hate Filipinos or their way of life.

Edited by Headshot
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to_dave007
1 hour ago, Headshot said:

Oh, and prepare for a :shitstormretarded: if you do complain to the barangay captain about one of your neighbors over loud karaoke (or whatever) at night. All of the other neighbors will come after you because you are trying to kill their culture ... or that you just hate Filipinos or their way of life.

lol..  been there..  done that..  police closed down drunken karaoke at 1am last night (at my request after my wife asked me to) and this morning they turned the speakers directly towards us at 6:30am and set the volume to rock concert level..  about 60 feet from my house..   

As for laws..  a quick visit to police station this morning and the SB office confirms that there IS a municipal ordinance from 2011 and that it's the current law that the PNP enforce.  I have a copy.  Specifically..  in residential areas hours of operation limited to 9am to 9pm.. (11pm weekday and midnight on weekend if non-residential) and sound levels limited to 78 decibels.  Prescribed penalties start at 1000 peso fine.   I'll try to scan the ordinance and place it here..  Just 2 pages..  Likely not today.  

As for anyone assuming that "I am trying to kill their culture..  or that I hate Filipino and their way of life"..  the ordinance was signed into municipal law by 10 elected counsellors, the Vice Mayor and the Mayor..  each an elected and respected elder of the community.. and importantly..  each a Filipino.  In other words..  it's not MY law..  it's theirs.  And as for those who complained about the noise..  yes.. I am a foreigner and I know that will attract criticism from some locals..  But several Filipino also complained..  Not just me.

At any rate..  my travels this morning confirmed that this municipal ordinance is the ONLY noise law being enforced here in Tuburan.  Seems there is no federal or provincial law as yet.  The only other laws that may come into play are laws about public nuisance and vexatious conduct.

Edited by to_dave007

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to_dave007

Further evidence that it's NOT only foreigners who don't like the late night videoke.  Unfortunately not yet passed into law.

End is near for annoying late-night videoke sessions if…
March 13, 2018

The House of Representatives Committee on Public Order and Safety has begun tackling a bill seeking to limit the use of sing-along and other sound amplifying equipment between 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. in residential areas.

The measure, proposed by Quezon 4th District Rep. Angelina Tan, aims to prevent unnecessary disturbance to residential areas, as well as to stop the negative social and health effects of such activities.

Under House Bill No. 1035 – “An Act Prohibiting the use of Videoke/Karaoke systems and Other Sound Amplifying Equipment that Cause Unnecessary Disturbance to the Public within the Residential Areas, and Providing Penalties Therefor” – the operation of such equipment audible within 50 feet distance from the source should be considered as evidence.

Other equipment enumerated in the bill were radios, CD players, television sets, amplified musical instruments, and loudspeakers.

Regardless of the occasion, Tan said individuals or groups would only allowed to use or operate such equipment from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

According to the measure, any person or business entity violating the rule would face a fine of P1,000 or an imprisonment of not more than six months, or both, based on the discretion of the court.  For succeeding offenses, both penalties would apply, in addition to the revocation of the license to operate a business, Tan said.

If the violation is committed by a corporation, partnership, association, or similar entity, the president, general manager or most senior officers would be held liable, she added.

During the committee hearing on Tuesday, Tan stressed the need for national legislation on the issue, saying it “has not only caused quarrels and divisions among our neighborhoods but also death to some individuals.”

Ruby Palma, volunteer from Friends of the Environment in Negros Oriental (Fenor), underscored that the “proliferation of videoke business gave rise to serious neighborhood quarrels,” and has “compromised the resting time especially of children, pregnant women and the elderly.”

Palma suggested five points to be added to Tan’s bill:

  • designation of areas where videoke/karaoke and similar equipment would be allowed
  • requirement of structural sound-proofing
  • setting maximum sound volume level
  • setting maximum time use for private and home use of equipment
  • monitoring, reporting, and evaluation of the law’s implementation

Negros Oriental 3rd District Rep. Arnolfo Teves Jr. also suggested the specific decibel level to be allowed under the bill.
“Kasi pwede kung ano yung loud sayo, pwedeng hindi sa kanya dahil bingi sya,” he said.

Antipolo City 2nd District Rep. Romeo Acop, who also chairs the committee, pointed out, however, that the existing presidential decrees already addressed noise pollution.

But Tan acknowledged in her bill these existing anti-noise pollution laws – such as the Philippine Environmental Code (Presidential Decree No. 1152) and the National Pollution Control Decree (PD No. 984).  But she said these laws did not “squarely address President Rodrigo Duterte’s policy pronouncement of enforcing a 10 p.m. ban on videoke/karaoke singing.”  Under PD 1152, “appropriate standards for community noise levels” as well as “limits on the acceptable level of noise emitted from a given equipment for the protection of public health and welfare” should be established.

Duterte earlier pressed local government units to stamp out noisy late-night karaoke sessions.

The President has also imposed the same ordinance when he was mayor of Davao City.

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/974941/no-more-late-night-videoke-sessions-if-house-bill-becomes-law

 

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shadow

The music and singing, like the roosters, dogs, loud exhaust, and howling children, seldom bother me any more. The most bothersome thing to me when I first moved here 15 years ago was the church and it's da**ed bell, a noisier bunch has never been created by god or man. At that time it was ok for the church to wake up the entire town at 3 am every morning for a month, but it was not allowed for a licensed business to stay open past 10 because it might disturb someone.

Two things happened that ended all that here. A new family in the mayor position, and the pastor of the church stole (sold) the bell and quit. Thank you lord!

Nowadays, I am the sound man for a local rock band, and as such I have much more equipment and can make much more noise than anybody within blocks. If it's too noisy for me to hear the movie or music I am listening to, I simply turn it up until I cannot hear any outside noise any more.  Works great for me!

The nail that sticks up is the first one to get hammered. If peace of mind is what you want, just don't let them bother you. If you want to be left alone, leave them alone.

Otherwise you will never be truly happy here.

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to_dave007
17 minutes ago, shadow said:

If you want to be left alone, leave them alone.

Really?  Are you sure?

Didn't say anything at all when they held the first event, or the second, or the third.. hoping they would go away.  Instead.. the volume just went up, until we couldn't hold a conversation INSIDE our house, with all the windows closed.  Wasn't until about the 6th event that we asked at 1am for the event..  which started at about 8am the previous day..  to end.  My philosophy at the time was..  these are my neighbours..  let them have some fun..  it's not often.   But the gatherings simply got louder..  younger.. later..  and more drunk.  I understand your words.. "If you want to be left alone, leave them alone"..  and I tried to do exactly that.  All it got us was more volume later into the night.

and BTW..  as for chickens..  dogs..  cars..  motorcycles.. and the church bell..  none of them bother me.

Edited by to_dave007
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Headshot
1 hour ago, to_dave007 said:

Further evidence that it's NOT only foreigners who don't like the late night videoke.  Unfortunately not yet passed into law.

End is near for annoying late-night videoke sessions if…
March 13, 2018

The House of Representatives Committee on Public Order and Safety has begun tackling a bill seeking to limit the use of sing-along and other sound amplifying equipment between 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. in residential areas.

The measure, proposed by Quezon 4th District Rep. Angelina Tan, aims to prevent unnecessary disturbance to residential areas, as well as to stop the negative social and health effects of such activities.

Under House Bill No. 1035 – “An Act Prohibiting the use of Videoke/Karaoke systems and Other Sound Amplifying Equipment that Cause Unnecessary Disturbance to the Public within the Residential Areas, and Providing Penalties Therefor” – the operation of such equipment audible within 50 feet distance from the source should be considered as evidence.

Other equipment enumerated in the bill were radios, CD players, television sets, amplified musical instruments, and loudspeakers.

Regardless of the occasion, Tan said individuals or groups would only allowed to use or operate such equipment from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

According to the measure, any person or business entity violating the rule would face a fine of P1,000 or an imprisonment of not more than six months, or both, based on the discretion of the court.  For succeeding offenses, both penalties would apply, in addition to the revocation of the license to operate a business, Tan said.

If the violation is committed by a corporation, partnership, association, or similar entity, the president, general manager or most senior officers would be held liable, she added.

During the committee hearing on Tuesday, Tan stressed the need for national legislation on the issue, saying it “has not only caused quarrels and divisions among our neighborhoods but also death to some individuals.”

Ruby Palma, volunteer from Friends of the Environment in Negros Oriental (Fenor), underscored that the “proliferation of videoke business gave rise to serious neighborhood quarrels,” and has “compromised the resting time especially of children, pregnant women and the elderly.”

Palma suggested five points to be added to Tan’s bill:

  • designation of areas where videoke/karaoke and similar equipment would be allowed
  • requirement of structural sound-proofing
  • setting maximum sound volume level
  • setting maximum time use for private and home use of equipment
  • monitoring, reporting, and evaluation of the law’s implementation

Negros Oriental 3rd District Rep. Arnolfo Teves Jr. also suggested the specific decibel level to be allowed under the bill.
“Kasi pwede kung ano yung loud sayo, pwedeng hindi sa kanya dahil bingi sya,” he said.

Antipolo City 2nd District Rep. Romeo Acop, who also chairs the committee, pointed out, however, that the existing presidential decrees already addressed noise pollution.

But Tan acknowledged in her bill these existing anti-noise pollution laws – such as the Philippine Environmental Code (Presidential Decree No. 1152) and the National Pollution Control Decree (PD No. 984).  But she said these laws did not “squarely address President Rodrigo Duterte’s policy pronouncement of enforcing a 10 p.m. ban on videoke/karaoke singing.”  Under PD 1152, “appropriate standards for community noise levels” as well as “limits on the acceptable level of noise emitted from a given equipment for the protection of public health and welfare” should be established.

Duterte earlier pressed local government units to stamp out noisy late-night karaoke sessions.

The President has also imposed the same ordinance when he was mayor of Davao City.

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/974941/no-more-late-night-videoke-sessions-if-house-bill-becomes-law

 

This bill was submitted in 2018. Did this bill get passed by Congress and get signed by the President last year? If not, then This isn't a law.

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to_dave007
24 minutes ago, Headshot said:

This bill was submitted in 2018. Did this bill get passed by Congress and get signed by the President last year? If not, then This isn't a law.

isn't that what I said?  "Unfortunately not yet passed into law. "

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streak03

They can pass all the bills they can get signed, but without enforcement, the laws mean two things here...jack shit and f*ck all....

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Bama
16 minutes ago, streak03 said:

They can pass all the bills they can get signed, but without enforcement, the laws mean two things here...jack shit and f*ck all....

Exactly right.

In my wife's barrio the barangay guy is the only sheriff in town---there is not another policeman/official within 20K.

So who do you complain to about excessive noise when he is often right in the middle of the braying donkey (karaoke) fest to the wee hours of the morning ???

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Jester

I know someone that was going to "fix" the noise problem,  talked to the owners, police, barangay capt, some politicians.  Ended up selling the house and moving, although he never said I believe in fear of his family's well being. 

Edited by Jester
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