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SkyMan

Expats Understanding of Cebuano Words

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SkyMan
Posted (edited)

If you put Basol into Google Translate (Cebuano -> English) you get dibble (WTFO?)

Put in Basol ko and you might get My Basol because it doesn't know if the ko is the short form of Ako or Nako.

Put in Basol Ako and you get I'm sorry.

Edited by SkyMan
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Cebuandrew

Can't let this one go bro? I feel it. Had dinner tonight with a skydiver here who has 11 jumps tomorrow. "tomorrow." What's your word? 

How about "today." Where you are, it is "carone." Where I am, not so far away, it is "sera." "What." You are "unsa" and here it is "nano." Hell, even my island changes on language. Sooooo frustrating. "her" and "him" and words change. Let's take my island..."maayo buntag" is "good morning" from Santa Fe to Bantayan Proper. But, get to north end of island...then it is "maayo aga." The word for "people" is here and Cebu the same (think towel, but with a weird accent on the end of the word), but in Bohol is very different (Ta-wu). So, it is 7.107 islands and words are so different here. From island to island. I've found Ilonggo to be the easiest language to learn when juxtaposed with Bisayan, and Waray the hardest. But, I've found it interesting, and have asked locals in many places, what the word for "sorry is" and no place has it. Just da way it is Skybro. In short: wa ku ka sabot nano man pangutana mo kini nga pangutana? Lol. and to be honest, da "nga" still gets me everytime, as I cannot pronounce it right. It's like one has to suck up their sinuses and blow it out to do it right, and years of practice...I cannot still do it.

Bottem line, der is no word for "sorry" here.

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SkyMan
6 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

Had dinner tonight with a skydiver here who has 11 jumps tomorrow. "tomorrow." What's your word? 

Most I've done was 6 and that was a pretty full day.  Would have been 7 if I'd showed at the drop zone 10 minutes earlier.  11 is go go go.  Packing his own chute or is someone else?

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

"tomorrow." What's your word? 

Ugma.  Tomorrow morning, ugma sa buntag.

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

How about "today." Where you are, it is "carone."

Karon is more, now.  Karon nga adlaw (Karo'ng adlaw) is today. 

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

Where I am, not so far away, it is "sera."

Sira is close as in pagsira sa pultahan - close the door.

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

"What." You are "unsa" and here it is "nano."

Unsa - what, Ngano (more likely ngano man) - Why.

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

Sooooo frustrating. "her" and "him" and words change.

Siya (pronounced seeya or sha) is he, she, or even it - no gender.  That's why they often use the wrong English pronoun and I think more often they say she when they should use he because she is close to sha.  

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

Let's take my island..."maayo buntag" is "good morning" from Santa Fe to Bantayan Proper. But, get to north end of island...then it is "maayo aga."

Formally, it's Maayo nga buntag or Maayo'ng buntag, but yes it does get run into maayo buntag.  I try to stick with Maayo'ng buntag and try not to lose a syllable as in Ma eye ong bun tag.  At first it's a little tedious but you you get it after a while. Never heard aga but you have to go with where you're at.  I'm sure they will understand buntag though.  My wife is from Amlan Negros and when we were inBacolod she said, I like the way they talk here.

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

The word for "people" is here and Cebu the same (think towel, but with a weird accent on the end of the word), but in Bohol is very different (Ta-wu).

It's tawo here.

7 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

But, I've found it interesting, and have asked locals in many places, what the word for "sorry is" and no place has it. Just da way it is Skybro

Basol ko but there is.  Asking them about their own language often results in idk or wrong answers because they haven't been taught their own language and just learned it by hearing it.  So, asking why this or that or what is the word for often causes neuron misfiring.  They can tell you if you say something wrong or how to say it correctly but not why.  I've noticed my wife will sometimes tell me I said something right when I didn't but she understood what I meant.

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Cebuandrew
2 hours ago, SkyMan said:

Packing his own chute or is someone else?

First, awesome answers on language here. I speak more than any foreigners living on my island, but the spelling is not my forte. "Him" and "her" has been my recent frustration, as some tell me it is gender specific (si imo for him, and si eeya for her), while others tell me what you say--it is not gender specific. I've traveled many, many places in the Visayas and have never heard nga in a greeting of good morning. Here, sera is today, yet in Cebu ,everyone I've talked to carone is the word for that. Here nano means what. It is ano in tagalog and unsa in Bisayan. Could be wrong, but in my travels, everyone seems to understand me. Oh, and here, tomorrow morning is "bukas sa buntag" tho my spelling is not good. I do love the Bisayan language, but damn, it can be so different from place to place. Lol...and then I have dinner a few times a month with the wife of my biz partner, who grew up in Negros, and most words seems to change. I also never say "salamat" as...to me...that word is reserved for tourists and newbies. But, in the right setting a "thank you po" really can resonate. Nonetheless, much respect to your language skills. I wish I can get to that level.

"packing his own chute." Lol...no Laura does not pack her chutes. She's a cool cat, from Argentina, who is 1 of the main 2 tandem jumpers here. Linda Loo is the Filipina plane pilot and it is a big operation here. Many, many people come to Bantayan just for skydiving. I'm told mostly Chinese & Koreans. They have a crew that packs the chutes. She said for today, they load up, plane takes off, 10-minutes later they jump. Hit the ground, unhook it all, and by time plane taxis and comes back, new jumpers are ready with 2-3 harnesses and they take off again. She says the biggest variable on timing is the size of the jumper and wind speeds. If jumper is 40 kilo Chinese lady and wind at 2000-3000 feet is gusty, then they tend to go back and forth in the air for several minutes, instead of down.

I suppose if one loves skydiving, like she does, it is as good a job as one could have. I won't divulge how much she gets paid per jump, but wow. Come to think of it, she just got back from a vacation in Palawan, and the skydivers do seem to take many vacations, so if you want, why not come meet them all and become a "moonlighter" to come up a week here and there when they are away?

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shadow
1 hour ago, Cebuandrew said:

First, awesome answers on language here. I speak more than any foreigners living on my island, but the spelling is not my forte. "Him" and "her" has been my recent frustration, as some tell me it is gender specific (si imo for him, and si eeya for her), while others tell me what you say--it is not gender specific. I've traveled many, many places in the Visayas and have never heard nga in a greeting of good morning. Here, sera is today, yet in Cebu ,everyone I've talked to carone is the word for that. Here nano means what. It is ano in tagalog and unsa in Bisayan. Could be wrong, but in my travels, everyone seems to understand me. Oh, and here, tomorrow morning is "bukas sa buntag" tho my spelling is not good. I do love the Bisayan language, but damn, it can be so different from place to place. Lol...and then I have dinner a few times a month with the wife of my biz partner, who grew up in Negros, and most words seems to change. I also never say "salamat" as...to me...that word is reserved for tourists and newbies. But, in the right setting a "thank you po" really can resonate. Nonetheless, much respect to your language skills. I wish I can get to that level.

"packing his own chute." Lol...no Laura does not pack her chutes. She's a cool cat, from Argentina, who is 1 of the main 2 tandem jumpers here. Linda Loo is the Filipina plane pilot and it is a big operation here. Many, many people come to Bantayan just for skydiving. I'm told mostly Chinese & Koreans. They have a crew that packs the chutes. She said for today, they load up, plane takes off, 10-minutes later they jump. Hit the ground, unhook it all, and by time plane taxis and comes back, new jumpers are ready with 2-3 harnesses and they take off again. She says the biggest variable on timing is the size of the jumper and wind speeds. If jumper is 40 kilo Chinese lady and wind at 2000-3000 feet is gusty, then they tend to go back and forth in the air for several minutes, instead of down.

I suppose if one loves skydiving, like she does, it is as good a job as one could have. I won't divulge how much she gets paid per jump, but wow. Come to think of it, she just got back from a vacation in Palawan, and the skydivers do seem to take many vacations, so if you want, why not come meet them all and become a "moonlighter" to come up a week here and there when they are away?

Well, as soon as you think you have it all figured out, just go 100 KM in any direction and it will be different.

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SkyMan
2 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

"Him" and "her" has been my recent frustration, as some tell me it is gender specific (si imo for him, and si eeya for her), while others tell me what you say--it is not gender specific.

Most  of the gender specific words you hear are borrowed from Spanish.

13 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

But, get to north end of island...then it is "maayo aga."

I wonder if that's just an abbreviated slang term.  This morning is Kini'ng buntaga.  So maybe Maayo aga is just a shortened version of Maayo'ng buntaga.

13 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

to be honest, da "nga" still gets me everytime, as I cannot pronounce it right. It's like one has to suck up their sinuses and blow it out to do it right, and years of practice...I cannot still do it.

Yeah, not easy.  If you just use na they understand.

2 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

I also never say "salamat" as...to me...that word is reserved for tourists and newbies.

Use salamat and hear it all time.

2 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

But, in the right setting a "thank you po" really can resonate.

Ewwww, mixing English and Tagalog?  Perish the thought.  I don't do Tagalog.  :lol:

3 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

Nonetheless, much respect to your language skills. I wish I can get to that level.

I know more the structure but less the vocabulary. I really can't carry on much of a conversation, largely because my brain doesn't pick the words apart very fast and someone will say something and I'll punt reply in English and then realize what they said and how I should have answered moments later.  Kind of like when you think of a really good comeback to someone 2 minutes after it would have been really funny.  You probably know more phrases and conversation than I do and would do well with some classes but finding a teacher is tough.

3 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

They have a crew that packs the chutes.

USPA rules require a jumper to pack their own or a licensed rigger.  I wouldn't think they'd have a lot of riggers here but who knows.  On their website anyway, they require an active USPA membership to jump so I assume they are following the rules.  I've thought about going for a jump and my wife would love to tandem but their prices are way high.  Probably do it in the US next time we're there.

3 hours ago, Cebuandrew said:

She says the biggest variable on timing is the size of the jumper and wind speeds. If jumper is 40 kilo Chinese lady and wind at 2000-3000 feet is gusty, then they tend to go back and forth in the air for several minutes, instead of down.

I've seen some lightweight girls on big student canopies (like 390 sqft) just hang there for 15-20 minutes.  Hahahahaha

When I was avid I was around 200lbs and had a 210sqft speed racer canopy.  No hanging around for me.

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Cebuandrew
51 minutes ago, shadow said:

Well, as soon as you think you have it all figured out, just go 100 KM in any direction and it will be different.

Lol...I'll never think i have it all figured out: language, women, local customs, weather, etc. I just try my best and take it all in as humorous a stride as I can. Way I see it, with so many islands here, most generations did not travel from island to island to share a commen set of words. Heck, Bantayan is a small island, yet many, if not most locals in Santa Fe have never been to other side of island. In Madridejos, only 27km from Santa Fe, the locals there use a bit of Ilonggo in their dialect. Reminds me about a recent thread here about superstitions. Like dialect, superstitions vary from island to island.

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Cebuandrew
1 hour ago, SkyMan said:

So maybe Maayo aga is just a shortened version

It's Ilonggo, which is spoken more on the north side of my island.

 

1 hour ago, SkyMan said:

Ewwww, mixing English and Tagalog?  Perish the thought.

Idk...I once spent 2 years here with a real estate office and spent many days out and about with my biz partner there. He was born and raised in Manila in a well to-do family. I guess I picked up some language habits from him, as he never said salamat.

 

1 hour ago, SkyMan said:

When I was avid I was around 200lbs and had a 210sqft speed racer canopy.  No hanging around for me.

I look up somedays here and see something I never saw in the U.S. There can be 3 layers of clouds and each layer is going a different direction. You never know if you'll hang around.

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seanm
1 hour ago, Cebuandrew said:

 

Idk...I once spent 2 years here with a real estate office and spent many days out and about with my biz partner there. He was born and raised in Manila in a well to-do family. I guess I picked up some language habits from him, as he never said salamat.

 

I hear Salamat often (Salamat Kayoo and Dahang Salmat) which is nice! Being thankful is an incredibly important aspect of life anywhere.

Also, for "sorry" my gf told me it is something like "Pa-say-LU-ah" but a lot of time with language I don't 100% believe her. The way she uses shortcuts with speech/written word is wild imo.

Maybe it is just my experience, but many times I feel people don't fully understand each other (they like half understand what someone is saying), but they don't say anything like, "Wa ko kasabot nimo. Unsa?" and just kind of make there own conclusion to what the person was trying to say. I have witnessed the way rumors/tsismis/tsismosa can spread and it seems to just be a lack of understanding. 

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Cebuandrew
1 hour ago, seanm said:

Being thankful is an incredibly important aspect of life anywhere.

Agreed. I say "thank you" a lot. So did my last biz partner. Cannot imagine not having basic manners. Pasayloa = forgive. As in pasayloa ko ("forgive me"), which is different than a simple sorry.

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KID
Posted (edited)
On 8/23/2019 at 11:47 AM, Cebuandrew said:

Bottem line, der is no word for "sorry" here.

Why would there be, according to the EX Filipinos are never wrong about anything. even if she drive the wrong way down a one way street. The city is wrong for making it the wrong direction :biggrin_01:

Edited by KID
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Soupeod
17 hours ago, KID said:

Why would there be, according to the EX Filipinos are never wrong about anything. even if she drive the wrong way down a one way street. The city is wrong for making it the wrong direction :biggrin_01:

Well Bro like any nation/culture one person does not rep everyone. 😊

/cheers

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Cebuandrew
20 hours ago, KID said:

Why would there be, according to the EX Filipinos are never wrong about anything. even if she drive the wrong way down a one way street. The city is wrong for making it the wrong direction :biggrin_01:

Agreed totally. It comes down to what I read before I came here--Filipinos cannot, under any circumstance, "lose face." It was one thing to read all about this concept, but another thing to watch it for years now. We can read this thread, and see people saying what words are for "repent," "sorry" and "forgive" but let me now ask this: Has anyone here EVER actually heard a local say that word? I'm pretty sure I will never hear a local say pasayloa ko. It will never happen. 

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KID
14 hours ago, Soupeod said:

Well Bro like any nation/culture one person does not rep everyone. 😊

/cheers

LOL, Hell it took my Fhil/American daughter born and raised in America till she was like 4-4.5 to actually say the words I am sorry when she done something wrong. And when she finally did, it was ONLY cuz she was tired of standing in the corner

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RangerUp
On 8/24/2019 at 8:18 AM, SkyMan said:

they often use the wrong English pronoun and I think more often they say she when they should use he

When I first heard this it was like listening to children. Now? I've actually done it myself more than once.

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