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BossHog

What's this fruit?

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BossHog
Posted (edited)

A young village boy brought me two bags of these things this morning. They're a little sweet and very bitter. 20 pesos for the lot.berry2.jpg.34554c2bad5b56a9bd97d1426aa80452.jpg

Look a bit like jujubes (aka red dates, Chinese dates) but you usually see those dried so not so sure. Plus, jujubes are a lot sweeter.

Anyone know what these are and what to do with them? Too bitter to eat as is.

At a minimum I'll save the seeds and plant them to attract hornbills.

Also, maybe make an infused vodka, lol.

 

Edited by BossHog
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Kahuna
Posted (edited)

They look like cranberries Boss...

Not native to your area tho  lol  

I'l keep looking  :P

 

how about this?  bignay (considered as wild fruit in the Philippines)

bignay (considered as wild fruit in the Philippines)

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antidesma_bunius

Quote

Antidesma bunius

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Antidesma bunius

Scientific classification

Kingdom:

Plantae

(unranked):

Angiosperms

(unranked):

Eudicots

(unranked):

Rosids

Order:

Malpighiales

Family:

Phyllanthaceae

Tribe:

Antidesmeae

Genus:

Antidesma

Species:

A. bunius

Binomial name

Antidesma bunius

(L.) Spreng.

Ripe Bignay fruit

Antidesma bunius is a species of fruit tree in the Phyllanthaceae. It is native to Southeast Asia and northern Australia. Its common Philippine name and other names include bignay,[1] bugnay or bignai, Chinese-laurel,[1] Queensland-cherry,[1]salamander-tree,[1] wild cherry,[1] and currant tree.[1] This is a variable plant which may be short and shrubby or tall and erect, approaching 30 metres in height. It has large oval shaped leathery evergreen leaves up to about 20 cm long and seven wide. They are attached to the twigs of the tree with short petioles, creating a dense canopy.

Bignay, Philippines

The species is dioecious, with male and female flowers growing on separate trees. The flowers have a strong, somewhat unpleasant scent. The staminate flowers are arranged in small bunches and the pistillate flowers grow on long racemes which will become the long strands of fruit. The fruits are spherical and just under a centimetre wide, hanging singly or paired in long, heavy bunches. They are white when immature and gradually turn red, then black.

Each bunch of fruits ripens unevenly, so the fruits in a bunch are all different colors. The skin of the fruit has red juice, while the white pulp has colorless juice. The fruit contains a light-colored seed. The fruit has a sour taste similar to that of the cranberrywhen immature, and a tart but sweet taste when ripe. This tree is cultivated across its native range and the fruits are most often used for making wine and tea and is also used to make jams and jellies. It is often grown as a backyard fruit tree in Java.

There is an inverse correlation between the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide and bitterness in A. bunius.[2]

 

Edited by Kahuna
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BossHog
8 minutes ago, Kahuna said:

how about this?  bignay (considered as wild fruit in the Philippines)

Thanks , that was fast and I think you're right.

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Jawny

My wife ate these as a child.  Stole them from a neighbors tree.  Looked just like the bignay image, though no name she recalls.  Should be sweet, so if not, may be harvested too soon.......as usual. 

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maximian

It looks to small to be bignay. I would say it was Lipote as the fruit looks very similar to the one we have on our land.  

 

 

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HongKongPhooey
Posted (edited)

Probably only my constant paranoia, because I am convinced they are trying to poison me; but eat first, ask questions later?  I admire you brave man.

Edited by HongKongPhooey
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SkyMan

Look like Cherries to me.  Some wild sour variety?

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maximian
7 hours ago, maximian said:

It looks to small to be bignay. I would say it was Lipote as the fruit looks very similar to the one we have on our land.  

 

 

I said that the wrong way round. It looks to big to be bignay. Our Lipote tree had a lot fruit last month and it look the same  they are aslo quite bitter. One of my sister in laws eats them after dipping them in salt :rolleyes:

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bert
On 8/2/2019 at 8:43 AM, Jawny said:

My wife ate these as a child.  Stole them from a neighbors tree.  Looked just like the bignay image, though no name she recalls.  Should be sweet, so if not, may be harvested too soon.......as usual. 

yes true  the guava on my land is stolen months before it is mature even if i put it  into bags on the tree sorry the birds ate it fark

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