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Mr. J E Pierce
20 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

I know I'm nit picking..  but I assume 300ml and 1000 ml is a typo..  and should be 300L and 1000L

Yes My apologies to the confusion, it should have been liters not Milliliters. (lol, that would be a really small storage system) I must have been thinking of the water bottle nest to my chair

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Yes and the submersibles are a lot more power efficient. Also if using the PVC type casing it is best to have the submersible switched on / off via a 3 phase contactor so  that the actives, neutral an

I wanted to use PVC casing and found a supplier of really good quality 4" PVC at a place in Lapux2 (I think).  The driller advised against it though because the drill bit used was only 4" so the pipe

Here’s another one: I like hot water in the shower and to shave so we have water heaters in the CRs and kitchen.  The local plumbers may not understand that a toilet does not need to be supp

Mr. J E Pierce
20 hours ago, TimL said:

Maybe try cebuchampionhardware.com in Kasambagan. 

Thank you for the suggestion, I will contact thm and see if the can get the 4 inch blue PVC pipe once I know the final depth.

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Paddy

Even with reliable mains power and solar, the elevated tank will provide backup for “when” the pump fails. 

Our last two failures have been caused by the pump installers using galvanized adapter fittings at the foot valve/injector which corroded. We can’t seem to get brass or stainless here (Masbate) and our preferred crew is only just working out how to do it with plastic (😄). The water we’re pumping can corrode galvanized fittings in as little as 6 or 7 months. One well lasted a few years, the new one only 7 months. 

I drilled a well in Canada and fitted a pump over 30 years ago. Nothing has ever been pulled out of that well since and it still works. 

I recommend checking any metal fittings your crew is planning to use in the well. 

If you can get it (we can’t) I also recommend appropriate continuous hose. 5 plus 10ft lengths of blue pipe stuck together with glue holding your submersible pump is OK when done properly but...

Securing the pump (or foot valve / injector) at the top of the well is also a good idea. You may be OK in this regard since with a submersible you have a power line in addition to the pipe. Just make sure the mechanical connections of the power line are good enough to support the weight of the pump.

Happy water pumping!

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Mr. J E Pierce
17 minutes ago, Paddy said:

Even with reliable mains power and solar, the elevated tank will provide backup for “when” the pump fails. 

Our last two failures have been caused by the pump installers using galvanized adapter fittings at the foot valve/injector which corroded. We can’t seem to get brass or stainless here (Masbate) and our preferred crew is only just working out how to do it with plastic (😄). The water we’re pumping can corrode galvanized fittings in as little as 6 or 7 months. One well lasted a few years, the new one only 7 months. 

I drilled a well in Canada and fitted a pump over 30 years ago. Nothing has ever been pulled out of that well since and it still works. 

I recommend checking any metal fittings your crew is planning to use in the well. 

If you can get it (we can’t) I also recommend appropriate continuous hose. 5 plus 10ft lengths of blue pipe stuck together with glue holding your submersible pump is OK when done properly but...

Securing the pump (or foot valve / injector) at the top of the well is also a good idea. You may be OK in this regard since with a submersible you have a power line in addition to the pipe. Just make sure the mechanical connections of the power line are good enough to support the weight of the pump.

Happy water pumping!

Thanks, sorry to here of your troubles. This is why I asked the question now. So I can get the right material before I needed it.

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Paddy
1 hour ago, Mr. J E Pierce said:

troubles. 

You’re welcome. Trouble is easy to come by here. Weak infrastructure, unavailable “correct” materials and, except for a handful of good workers, a “make do is good enough” attitude. 

 

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Ozepete
2 hours ago, Mr. J E Pierce said:

Thanks for your Share, I am just looking at my options. There are A few companies out their now that have some really nice solar powered submersible pumps.

I am confused on your second paragraph, what I am looking at are tru DC motors (positive and Negative) I am well aware of how to convert DC to AC and Vice Versa.

I appreciate you mentioning who drilled your Bore, Are you on Cebu Island, and are you on the south or north part. I am not familiar with all the towns and Provinces of Cebu

Thanks for the suggestion, That is pretty much the type I am looking at. No batteries

There is no such thing as a 'Tru DC motor as such. An electric motor field winding (or armature) current has to alternate so it can rotate. This is done by various means like a commutator / brushes or shaded pole triggered external polarity switching for example, but none of which suit powering a bore pump. My company here in Oz manufactures DC refrigeration systems and our (and all other so called 12VDC compressors) compressor motors are all as described, 12 VDC converted to 3 phase alternating current, and this is the same for 'DC  bore pumps. We call the black box that houses the DC to AC conversion, a Motor driver module where as the bore pump people call theirs a 'Frequency converter'  So they are actually 3 phase AC!

The problems our industry had was that these converters were DOL (Direct on line) and with such a start up current rush they obviously didn't last long and were unrealistically expensive to replace. Now we have a soft start version for our compressors but not sure if the pump people have that technology yet. If they don't.. dont!

Regards my bore, we are here in Australia were there is massive underground water and luckily ours is purer than rain water. Drilled by: https://www.strathmertondrilling.com.au/

Hope this helps. 

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SkyMan
2 hours ago, Mr. J E Pierce said:

Not Sure why the double holding tanks, just seems like a good idea. It was an idea to be able to hold un filtered water for the less desired watering needs like irrigation.

That adds an extra pump to your system though and being on the surface you'd have that noise.  I would have the submersible pump to the tower and then from there, filter or not filter as you need.  You could also have 2 1KL tanks on your tower, and fill to both but have one for filtered/chlorinated water for the house and the other for irrigation.  Or fill to one while using the other and then switch to reduce algae.

2 hours ago, Mr. J E Pierce said:

Thank you for the suggestion, I will contact thm and see if the can get the 4 inch blue PVC pipe once I know the final depth.

There's  more than one brand of blue and quality varies.  I go with Atlanta brand.

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Paddy

Having put in a holding tank for our new place (and cross connected input and output) so that the house system is pressurized when there is power and gravity fed when not, I have learned a couple of things.

1. The holding tank should be at least 10 feet above the ceiling of the highest room that will be supplied with water.  Our tank is at the roofline on a platform that was built with the frame of the house. Down at ground level there is lots of pressure, but at the CRs it is a bit weak. It’s an elevated, colonial style bungalow.

2. Have the house system flushed before connecting any taps etc. The amount of crap in our lines was crazy. The blue pipe plumbers use an old hacksaw blade to roughen the pipe surface before applying the solvent. A lot of shavings get left in the pipes. I am not convinced that a roughened surface and solvent is the correct way to join the blue pipe. In Canada for similar materials (usually drain pipe) you always had to buy two tins - a cleaner/primer and the solvent. No one here has heard of the cleaner/primer and the hardware stores don’t sell it. 

3. I know it sounds crazy but make sure your tank installer fits a float valve. Parts sold separately! Even though I’d mentioned it and the receipts said they’d bought one, when we fired up the system we had a massive tank overflow. No float valve installed! The other thing that got fired was the crew that installed the tank!😄 But then they also did a few other things “wrong”.

4. Make sure the plumbers talk to the tilers to determine where the tile surface will be so that connections are fitted in the correct place. It’s a pain fixing this when they get it wrong. 

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Mr. J E Pierce
14 hours ago, Paddy said:

Having put in a holding tank for our new place (and cross connected input and output) so that the house system is pressurized when there is power and gravity fed when not, I have learned a couple of things.

1. The holding tank should be at least 10 feet above the ceiling of the highest room that will be supplied with water.  Our tank is at the roofline on a platform that was built with the frame of the house. Down at ground level there is lots of pressure, but at the CRs it is a bit weak. It’s an elevated, colonial style bungalow.

2. Have the house system flushed before connecting any taps etc. The amount of crap in our lines was crazy. The blue pipe plumbers use an old hacksaw blade to roughen the pipe surface before applying the solvent. A lot of shavings get left in the pipes. I am not convinced that a roughened surface and solvent is the correct way to join the blue pipe. In Canada for similar materials (usually drain pipe) you always had to buy two tins - a cleaner/primer and the solvent. No one here has heard of the cleaner/primer and the hardware stores don’t sell it. 

3. I know it sounds crazy but make sure your tank installer fits a float valve. Parts sold separately! Even though I’d mentioned it and the receipts said they’d bought one, when we fired up the system we had a massive tank overflow. No float valve installed! The other thing that got fired was the crew that installed the tank!😄 But then they also did a few other things “wrong”.

4. Make sure the plumbers talk to the tilers to determine where the tile surface will be so that connections are fitted in the correct place. It’s a pain fixing this when they get it wrong. 

Thanks for the tips, These are all things that concern me. It is my intent to put the tank up in the air at 50 ft since we plan on building a two story Spanish Colonial style home. I will remember to send the primer/clearer  from the states when we get ready to start our plumbing. I am actually think of sending PEX tubing for the house plumbing with all the parts and the tool.

 

 

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Paddy

Here’s another one:

I like hot water in the shower and to shave so we have water heaters in the CRs and kitchen. 

The local plumbers may not understand that a toilet does not need to be supplied with hot water!😄 There does not seem to be the concept of hot and cold systems - just cold - and since Sir wants a heater, the cold feed will go first to the heater and then everywhere else!

I am going to assume that you will have more professional crews but ask them a few questions from time to time!

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SkyMan
8 hours ago, Mr. J E Pierce said:

I am actually think of sending PEX tubing for the house plumbing with all the parts and the tool.

Had a small discussion on PEX a while back.  If you really want it you'll have to be very careful to bring all the parts you need or expect long delays in ordering more.  You'll have to train someone here to do the install or do it yourself.  PPR is available here.

1 hour ago, Paddy said:

I am going to assume that you will have more professional crews but ask them a few questions from time to time!

You will need to be very hands on or end up doing a lot or repairs (aka "back work").

Edited by SkyMan
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SkyMan
On 7/15/2019 at 1:58 AM, Mr. J E Pierce said:

Hello,

As my wife and I are starting construction of our Homestead (Tunga MoalBoal/ Alcantra), I am trying to find 4 inch PVC Pipe (blue) to use as a well casement. we are still digging the well, and are not sure of the final amount (feet). The well digger is estimating 100 ft. I hit a couple of the larger Hardware store in Cebu City, but no one seems to have the 4 " blue PVC, just the sanitary 4" orange pvc. Does anyone have a name and number to a supplier of the 4" Blue PVC PIPE?

From your intro thread, you're retiring here in 15 years but you're starting work on the house now?  Are you going to be here for the build?  Not being here in daily involvement with the build is a recipe for disaster.

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Headshot
10 hours ago, Mr. J E Pierce said:

Thanks for the tips, These are all things that concern me. It is my intent to put the tank up in the air at 50 ft since we plan on building a two story Spanish Colonial style home. I will remember to send the primer/clearer  from the states when we get ready to start our plumbing. I am actually think of sending PEX tubing for the house plumbing with all the parts and the tool.

Putting a tank 50 feet in the air will cost you a lot of money, and it will be very susceptible to severe damage from earthquakes. I started out thinking the same thing. I settled  for a shorter tower. I provided good flow (because I put 1" PPE pipe throughout my home), but not a lot of pressure. You have to remember that you get approximately 15 lbs. of water pressure for every 34 feet you go up with your tank. In the end, I installed a pressure tank between the storage tank and the house to increase water pressure. As long as you have power, you can have great pressure regardless of how high the storage tank is.

Having the storage tank elevated is just an insurance policy against power outages. Then again, a storage tank is just an insurance policy against having water outages (problems with a water distribution system or a well that has problems). When I first moved to where I live, there was a well on the property, but after living here, the well went bad and couldn't be repaired because of its location (and because of government rules against drilling new private wells in the Cebu metro area). That was when we abandoned the well and got a connection to MCWD. Circumstances change, and that changes your options.

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fred42
8 hours ago, Headshot said:

(and because of government rules against drilling new private wells in the Cebu metro area).

 

We don`t live in Cebu but we just quietly had another deep well drilled..
When the water system goes wrong here,they get very annoyed if you keep asking why.

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Mr. J E Pierce
23 hours ago, SkyMan said:

From your intro thread, you're retiring here in 15 years but you're starting work on the house now?  Are you going to be here for the build?  Not being here in daily involvement with the build is a recipe for disaster.

Hello,

So I am building in stages. I have my wife's brothers and her Uncle is a well desired Builder in the Alcantara / MoalBoal area.

First stage is building the wall around the Property. That was finished in June. Second Stage is digging the well. Alcantara has a water problem like a lot of areas. SO this is necessary to be able to mix concrete. The third stage is to builder all the support columns (concrete) and supporting cross beams. Install the roof joists and roof material. Fourth Stage would be the dirt work, under the slab plumbing ruff in and electrical ruff in. Then Poring the concrete floors. Fifth Stage would be building exterior and interior walls between columns, installing exterior doors and windows. After this I will wait until I am close to moving to Cebu full time to finish up the construction.

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