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to_dave007

Death of a Canadian Friend and St Peters Funeral Homes Help with Ashes

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Dafey

Sorry for your loss Dave. Know that the likes on this thread are for you taking the time to document this process. Good info here and can be very useful for us in the future.

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cookie47
2 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

  It may sound inappropriate, but airport security MUST be able to x-ray the container and there MUST be nothing inside that will raise security alarms, as they will NOT open human remains for further inspection. 

 Sad... but Thanks for this excellent info. 

FYI and others,,my wife and i did this in the opposite direction. My SIL cremated in Australia, Ashes travelled to PH in hand carry as advised by crematorium.. No issues whatsoever with security. Just advised what it was. They were very accommodating. 

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Gus

Have had a similar experience with St Peters ..
NZ man living on Bantayan Island ,died on the ferry between Ste Fe and Hagnaya ..taken to Bogo hospital ..
My friend Richard ( also kiwi ,and also now sadly passed ) coordinated with family and St Peters to achieve the same result as you outline Dave.
A few months later Richard was travelling to NZ and took the ashes to the family.
I went with him to St Peters where they had been holding the urn.
This is only a third hand report, but my observation was that St Peters staff and service , was efficient , respectful, affordable , and really really helpful.
Condolences on the loss of your friend Dave .

Sent from my Mi A2 Lite using Tapatalk

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SkyMan

RIP Neil.

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Tradewindze

Was there ever a discussion or offer of a representative of the family coming to the PH to assist in the process ?

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to_dave007
3 hours ago, Tradewindze said:

Was there ever a discussion or offer of a representative of the family coming to the PH to assist in the process ?

Karen..  Neil's daughter..  was the one most interested to come.  But her husband was not comfortable with her travelling to Philippines without accompanying her.   You know how dangerous they all think it is back home.  But it means two tickets needed not one. Karen is out of work (company out of business) but her husband is working (after being laid off for some months).  But the cost of coming..  with the added LOSS of income..  would hurt.

Nonetheless, Neil's daughter and her husband were making final plans to travel to see her father when the news of her death reached her.  They didn't make the final booking.. and didn't come.

They COULD have come to help..  but money is tight throughout the family.  Karen decided to save the costs of the tickets..  so that the "costs" that would be incurred could be paid.  For me..  would likely have been a lot MORE work if they had come..  as they wouldn't know what to do or where to go..  so I would likely have needed to babysit them.  As it is..  by email and Western Union everything went pretty smooth.

 

 

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to_dave007

Final follow-up..  Ashes shipped from Cebu on 23rd July and arrived Vancouver 24th July.  The main delay was waiting for the consular certificate which needed to come from Canada Embassy in Manila through local consular office.  

So...  in summary..

  1. death on June 27
  2. death certificate to St Peters on July 2.  This was required prior to cremation.
  3. cremation on July 4
  4. passport arrived to St Peters July 4..  This started ball rolling for consular certificate
  5. ashes shipped on 23 July and arrived Vancouver on 24th.
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Headshot
Posted (edited)

So, what did the actual costs turn out to be (including transportation of his ashes back to Canada)?

Edited by Headshot

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to_dave007
1 hour ago, Headshot said:

So, what did the actual costs turn out to be (including transportation of his ashes back to Canada)?

Not including amounts paid prior to Neil's death, and amounts paid to the hospital and to Neil's  helper, the amounts paid for handling and movement of Neil's remains were as follows.. I think all paid to St Peter's: 

  1. 4,320 peso - transfer to Tuburan
  2. 7,500 peso - Embalming for 5 days @ 1,500/day
  3. 40,000 to 60,000 peso - coffin (can't remember exact)
  4. 12,000 peso - transfer to city
  5. 20,000 peso - cremation
  6. 30,000 peso - ship ashes to Vancouver
  7. 500 - Quarantine Permit
  8. 6,000 shipping documents

So..  120,000 to 140,000 total paid to St peters.  There may be some amounts additional that Neil's family paid without my knowing, but if so, they were minor expenses.

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Headshot

The thing I don't understand is why they required a coffin when there was no viewing and no burial. Even the embalming seems unnecessary if they have cold storage (which I assume they do).

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to_dave007
Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Headshot said:

The thing I don't understand is why they required a coffin when there was no viewing and no burial. Even the embalming seems unnecessary if they have cold storage (which I assume they do).

They did NOT have cold storage..  at least out here in Tuburan..  That's specifically WHY they needed the embalming. It may seem archaic..  but this is the province..  so we deal with it.  For the embalming we were told we can choose how many days they will embalm for.  I suppose they use more embalming fluid if the period is longer.  When the embalming was done we already knew the remains would be cremated and we had been told "we can get the cremation done tomorrow" (which would have been June 29)..   so the family initially wanted to skip the embalming.  But we still didn't have death certificate..  which was required for cremation..  and my counsel to family was "nothing moves fast here so you better embalm for at least 5 days to give time for it to happen".  Turned out this was right decision, as it WAS several days before death certificate was available and released by registrar at LGU.

As for the coffin..  I felt the exact same way.  But there seemed no way around it.  It seemed like a "base fee" for there services, which I suppose makes sense as the remains were there for a week..  and they had several arrangements they needed to make.  The only purpose the coffin served was that the remains DID need to be somewhere..  and was at least a respectful backdrop for the final photo's I took for the family.  The coffin is normally donated (to the needy) afterwards..  and I assume is not re-used.  They did have several types of coffins available..  some more expensive then the one we used.. though none seemed to be "just a plain pine box"..  like what I would think would be the lowest price option.  In the end.. the family was happy with the choice..  so it didn't matter.

Just an additional note on the coffin..  I suppose I envisioned that the remains would be in a "plain pine box" (unpainted) simply because there would be no viewing and a cremation rather than a burial.  So..  why the need for the fancy coffin hardware and the paint on the coffin.  But in reality..  the coffin WAS a "plain pine box"..  simply made of plywood....  but had been painted and fitted with their lowest cost hardware.  As I said above..  in the end the family was happy.. so the decision was made.

Edited by to_dave007
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shadow
13 hours ago, Headshot said:

The thing I don't understand is why they required a coffin when there was no viewing and no burial. Even the embalming seems unnecessary if they have cold storage (which I assume they do).

I don't understand why someone would assume small funeral homes would have cold storage, when most provincial meat processors, slaughterhouses, and supermarkets do not.

The coffins I have seen for cremation were just a plain wooden box, no reason for it to cost P50,000, that is just price gouging at it's worst. Maybe I should build my own. 

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SkyMan
Posted (edited)
16 minutes ago, shadow said:

Maybe I should build my own. 

My thoughts. Or tell her to buy a nice ref carton from Asian Home.

Edited by SkyMan
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