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Rexsmith

Any passenger vessels sailing from the Philippines to other countries?

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Rexsmith
Posted (edited)

Just wondering if there are any ships/boats passenger service from any cities in the Philippines to any of the nearby countries? Not cruise ships.  Thanks

Edited by Rexsmith

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BossHog
Posted (edited)

Basically there were two options:

1.The Zamboanga to Sandakan  (Sabah, Malaysia) ferry. There were several boats doing this route. One capsized and another two discontinued the route. Try contacting Aleson Shipping Lines to see if they have something currently operating.

The most recent schedule I can find is Zamboanga to Sandakan – departing on Mondays at 1:00 PM. 16 hours and 3-4k pesos depending on class of accommodation.

2. Davao-General Santos- Bitung. Bitung is the port for Manado on Sulawesi in Indonesia. It's not clear if the latter option is currently running..

Definitely not cruise ships, lol. The Zamboanga boats ferried the large Filipino working population in Malaysian Borneo back and forth. The boat to Indonesia is meant more to support trade between the two countries and is commercial in nature and quite slow.

 

Edited by BossHog

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Rexsmith

Thanks very much

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GwapoGuy
21 hours ago, BossHog said:

Definitely not cruise ships, lol. 

While on the subject of ships, are there any cruise ships in Philippines? I've seen them docked in Hong Kong.

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Jawny

There are cruise ships that dock in Manila. Lots on line with a google search.

However, there are also cruise ships that dock in places in Leyte.  Again, google search will give you the names and locations. I only know about Leyte, because I live there.  May be there are other locales as well. 

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TimL

I know that the stop in Subic but, not sure if any originate there. 

https://www.philstar.com/lifestyle/travel-and-tourism/2019/01/25/1887815/subic-emerges-cruise-ship-hub

 

hmmm... just a thought but, if a foreigner left on a cruise that originated from and returned to the Philippines, I wonder if Visa and onward flight stuff would all come into play? Something to think about I guess if taking a cruise. 

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SkyMan
55 minutes ago, TimL said:

I know that the stop in Subic but, not sure if any originate there. 

https://www.philstar.com/lifestyle/travel-and-tourism/2019/01/25/1887815/subic-emerges-cruise-ship-hub

 

hmmm... just a thought but, if a foreigner left on a cruise that originated from and returned to the Philippines, I wonder if Visa and onward flight stuff would all come into play? Something to think about I guess if taking a cruise. 

If a tourist, exit ticket would be required. Wouldn't have be a flight though. One could fly in using a booked cruise ticket as the onward ticket.  But then if returning on the cruise some other onward ticket would be required. 

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TimL
7 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

If a tourist, exit ticket would be required. Wouldn't have be a flight though. One could fly in using a booked cruise ticket as the onward ticket.  But then if returning on the cruise some other onward ticket would be required. 

Yeah, that’s kind of what I figured. 

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Ricky

The Asian market for cruises is growing rapidly, driven primarily by China, with ever increasing numbers of ships going to the Philippines. However, very few start or end their cruises in the Philippines due to the logistical nightmare and numerous complications that occur there. It might be more fun in the Philippines but it’s certainly not easier.

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Salty Dog
21 minutes ago, Ricky said:

The Asian market for cruises is growing rapidly, driven primarily by China,

 

Quote

Norwegian Cruise Line Is Moving Its Built-for-China Ship to the U.S.

Norwegian Cruise Line made a significant investment in China when it built a ship specifically for that market. But as executives like to say, ships are easy to move when necessary, and clearly Norwegian sees a brighter future in the U.S.

A little more than a year ago, Norwegian Cruise Line was celebrating its first China-based ship, Norwegian Joy, at a ceremony in Shanghai. Everything at the christening — ship included — had been customized for the market: the hull art, featuring a phoenix; the choreographed dance; the guest list; and the godfather, pop star Wang Leehom, who gave a performance.

“After years spent carefully designing this amazing vessel, my team and I are both proud and thrilled to finally christen the world’s first cruise ship custom-designed for the wonderful people of China,” said Frank Del Rio, president and CEO of parent company Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, at the June 2017 event.

On Wednesday, Norwegian was singing another tune. The operator announced a series of deployment changes that will see the 3,883-passenger Norwegian Joy leave China in April for the more lucrative waters of Alaska. Eventually, the ship will be replaced in China by a much smaller vessel that will sail there seasonally, but Norwegian will have no vessels in the country for about a year.

“China’s a good market. But it’s not as good as Alaska,” Norwegian Cruise Line President and CEO Andy Stuart told Skift in an interview. “In this business, particularly when you’re not the biggest, we don’t have 100 ships where we have to have a significant deployment essentially in every region around the world. We can be a little more opportunistic in how we deploy the fleet.”...

$50 MILLION UPGRADE

Before Norwegian Joy arrives, though, the vessel will get $50 million worth of renovations, including a Starbucks, an expanded spa and gym, downsized retail outlets and casinos, and more bars. In a note to investors, Wedbush Securities analyst James Hardiman noted that the upgrades were “somewhat of an unusual step for a ship just one year into its operation.”

Stuart said there were some features on the ship, which was built with China’s cruisers in mind, that wouldn’t translate for North American passengers, including larger retail and casinos, smaller gyms and spas, and tea rooms instead of bars. But he said the larger goal was to tailor Norwegian Joy to be as close as possible to Norwegian Bliss, which got a nationwide rollout this spring with stops in multiple cities.

THE CHINA BACKSTORY

Norwegian’s aspirations in China have evolved over the past year and a half as the market itself has fluctuated. In February 2017, Del Rio announced the company would send a second new ship to the country in 2019, saying it would be “the highest and best use” for the vessel.

He was sounding less certain a few months later, after tensions between China and South Korea forced cruise lines to stop calling on South Korean itineraries.....

By February of this year, Del Rio said the company would no longer deploy a second new ship to the market, and suggested it could be a couple of years before more capacity would head to China.

While he spoke highly of Norwegian Joy’s occupancy and ratings in March, Del Rio still described the market as “a work in progress” and a “long-term investment” that required patience.

In May, he did not give any indication that the company planned to withdraw from China for a while: Del Rio said he felt “better about China today than I certainly did six months ago” and said prices appeared to be rising as industry capacity dropped. Wednesday, he described the shifts as a correction.

“The realignment and optimization of ship assets also allows us to rightsize our capacity in China while maintaining our commitment to this promising cruise market,” Del Rio said in an announcement.

After years of rapid expansion, several cruise lines have lowered their China capacity this year amid forced itinerary changes and pricing struggles, sending ships to destinations with more favorable conditions.

While Norwegian has seven ships on order, due between 2019 and 2027, no new capacity has been announced for China. According to the plans released Wednesday, the 2,000-passenger Norwegian Spirit will move to China in summer of 2020 after an extensive refurbishment.

“Beyond that, we take a view and treat China like every other destination where we deploy capacity based on the demand as we see it,” Stuart said. “It’s a big market and one that we think has a positive future, but we don’t have a speicfic plan for capacity beyond Norwegian Spirit beyond this point.”

https://skift.com/2018/07/18/norwegian-cruise-line-is-moving-its-built-for-china-ship-to-the-u-s/

 

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