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lamoe

14 Reasons the Philippines Is Different from the Rest of the World

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shadow
13 minutes ago, Headshot said:

That is true, but it is also true for people in the Philippines in speaking Filipino (aka Tagalog) fluently. Both languages are somewhat taught in the schools as foreign languages (in all areas except those where Tagalog is the native tongue). Things will get even worse in the future because classes in public schools up to grade 3 are now taught in whatever the mother tongue is for the locality where the school resides. From grade 4 on, though, most classes are taught in English. Of course, many private schools will continue to teach all classes in English from pre-school on ... because they want to make sure their students have a future in a world dominated by English.

Even in government, business is often done in the local mother tongue, even though it is supposed to be done in English ... because there are many who struggle to carry on and entire conversation in English. That does NOT mean they can't understand English at all. Most would prefer to converse in their mother tongue. While Filipino and English are the official languages of the Philippines, most Philippine citizens are more comfortable speaking their mother tongue. The only reason why Filipino is understood at all in most of the Philippines is that it is the language of television in the Philippines. If that was switched to English, the Tagalog would disappear completely ... except in those areas where it is spoken as the mother tongue. But, if you want to give 90% of Filipinos a headache, try a conversation in either English or Tagalog. They will have to translate every word in their heads, just like we have to do with conversations in their mother tongues. There are 70 languages spoken in the Philippines, with over 700 dialects.

It is amazing that so many of us were able to find Filipinas who could converse with us in English. But even with them, sometimes speaking only English will give them a headache if they aren't used to it.

Not headache, NOSEBLEED!   :rolleyes:

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lamoe
2 minutes ago, shadow said:

Not headache, NOSEBLEED!   :rolleyes:

That caused me to remember my grandson suffered from frequent nosebleeds like many do here

Diagnosed as mildly high blood pressure combined with assumed thin veins in nose?

Meds for short term  and stress management (caused by father) theraphy solved issues of blood pressure although getting even mildly whacked on nose still makes it bleed

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Headshot
18 minutes ago, shadow said:

Not headache, NOSEBLEED!   :rolleyes:

Nosebleed is how they say headache.

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KID
42 minutes ago, Headshot said:

Nosebleed is how they say headache.

The power of White flower

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SkyMan
9 hours ago, shadow said:

I also find that of those 80% that speak English, a large percentage of them understand it not at all. The bigger the city, the more people that speak English. The farther you get into the provinces, the less likely you are to find fluent English speakers.

Yeah, they may teach English in schools but that doesn't mean they speak English.  They teach Math too but add a couple numbers or figure out the change in your head and you'll invoke shock and awe.  I took a year of German in HS and I still remember a few words and phrases but can hardly be considered a German speaker.  Everyone on LinC knows Palihug and Salamat and probably a few other important ones like Pila and Hangyu but that doesn't make us all Cebuano speakers.

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Davaoeno
2 hours ago, Headshot said:

Nosebleed is how they say headache.

I disagree. Nosebleed- or songgo- means headache from the inability to converse in English leading to you having to think too hard . It is NOT a medical term at all.

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Tradewindze

 

Very good, accurate list.

The woman going up the escalator the wrong way, pushing people aside, sounds similar to what occasionally occurs at ticket counters and piers. 

Have not been to Mexico recently, but they also have heavily armed guards at many stores.

 

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Headshot
1 hour ago, Davaoeno said:

I disagree. Nosebleed- or songgo- means headache from the inability to converse in English leading to you having to think too hard . It is NOT a medical term at all.

No shit? :crazy:

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East Saxon

My FIL knows only a few words of English but to his credit he does try to converse I know that it is daily routine is to feed his Chickens late afternoon on one occasion he was leaving his house with a Bucket of Feed and turned to me and said " I will eat my Chickens". 

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SkyMan
32 minutes ago, East Saxon said:

My FIL knows only a few words of English but to his credit he does try to converse I know that it is daily routine is to feed his Chickens late afternoon on one occasion he was leaving his house with a Bucket of Feed and turned to me and said " I will eat my Chickens". 

Should have answered, "Oo, kaon ta!"

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