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JohnSurrey

Tuna and Mercury - Alternatives ?

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JohnSurrey

We regularly buy tuna (most often Yellow Fin)  - whole fish usually weighs less than 1.5kg

My wife has mentioned the high mercury levels - should I be worried about this ? 

What are the better alternatives to Yellow Fin - preferably something we can chop up and put in the Freezer for a week ?

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Dafey

As a rule of thumb I don't eat any seafood that weighs more than 30 pounds. Fish have the ability to consume toxins and instead of killing the fish it stores the toxins in it's flesh. So, over time the toxins in really large fish often have a concentrated level of toxins.

1.5 kilos is a relatively young fish so not likely it is loaded with toxins...although the area that it has lived in could create a higher level than normal, (or lower).

 

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Semper paratus
19 hours ago, Dafey said:

As a rule of thumb I don't eat any seafood that weighs more than 30 pounds. Fish have the ability to consume toxins and instead of killing the fish it stores the toxins in it's flesh. So, over time the toxins in really large fish often have a concentrated level of toxins.

1.5 kilos is a relatively young fish so not likely it is loaded with toxins...although the area that it has lived in could create a higher level than normal, (or lower).

 

Wow, I could never eat that much fish. You must be a really big fellow. :D :ROFLMAO:

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Semper paratus

Mercury in fish and ?

I was tested 40 years ago as I had a really bad reaction to spray on iodine/Mercurochrome. They determined the blistering was due to the mercury in it. You could watch these silver dollar sized blisters grow right before your eyes and weep liquid down my leg. I had about a 10 inch gash from the knee down from a mishap. Soon after I had all my amalgam / silver fillings removed. Mercury is also in Calamine lotion, even in Preparation H, which I have thankfully never needed. They call me mercury sensitive/ allergic. I am supposed to wear my tag around my neck stating that information in case I am unconscious in an accident or what ever, but I seldom wear it. If I never see iodine or Mercurochrome again in my life it will be too soon. It took weeks to clear up those blisters.  I still have the scar after all theses years. It serves as a good reminder. Read up on what product's mercury is in or was used in the manufacturing process of. Fish is the mainstay of my diet, but as stated above it's best to stick to eating smaller fish. 

 

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to_dave007

My brother fishes the fresh water salmon in Lake Ontario back home..  and the general rule of thumb is to limit how much you consume a year.. and not eat the big ones..  specifically for the mercury.  All that industry took a toll over the years and won't be cleaned in our lifetimes.

He caught couple salmon more than he could use one day, and donated to men's homeless shelter.   They should be safe.. as it was likely the only salmon they got to eat for the year.

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Semper paratus
1 hour ago, to_dave007 said:

My brother fishes the fresh water salmon in Lake Ontario back home..  and the general rule of thumb is to limit how much you consume a year.. and not eat the big ones..  specifically for the mercury.  All that industry took a toll over the years and won't be cleaned in our lifetimes.

He caught couple salmon more than he could use one day, and donated to men's homeless shelter.   They should be safe.. as it was likely the only salmon they got to eat for the year.

I lived on Lake Michigan for 4 years, ate plenty of fish, lived on Lake Huron 10 more years and ate salmon. lake trout, and walleye before moving to the Philippines. Also ate a fair amount of fish out of Lake Huron, Lake Sinclair, the Detroit river, Lake Erie, many inland Michigan lakes and rivers, and a bunch of lakes in Northern Ontario. I'm 75 and still alive and pretty much very healthy. Just be careful of all the other mercury sources I mentioned above. Never ever get a silver amalgam filling.

 

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Semper paratus
20 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

We regularly buy tuna (most often Yellow Fin)  - whole fish usually weighs less than 1.5kg

My wife has mentioned the high mercury levels - should I be worried about this ? 

What are the better alternatives to Yellow Fin - preferably something we can chop up and put in the Freezer for a week ?

How about tanigue ? We eat it at least once a week. Plus tuna, the smaller ones. I also eat that farmed salmon at least twice a week. No side effects I know of. 

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to_dave007
1 hour ago, Semper paratus said:

I lived on Lake Michigan for 4 years, ate plenty of fish, lived on Lake Huron 10 more years and ate salmon. lake trout, and walleye before moving to the Philippines. Also ate a fair amount of fish out of Lake Huron, Lake Sinclair, the Detroit river, Lake Erie, many inland Michigan lakes and rivers, and a bunch of lakes in Northern Ontario. I'm 75 and still alive and pretty much very healthy. Just be careful of all the other mercury sources I mentioned above. Never ever get a silver amalgam filling.

 

Lol.. and when you are dead and buried all the little worms that find you are gonna glow funny colours in the dark.

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JohnSurrey
14 hours ago, Semper paratus said:

How about tanigue ? We eat it at least once a week. Plus tuna, the smaller ones. I also eat that farmed salmon at least twice a week. No side effects I know of. 

Is tanigue bulis ?

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RR3
9 hours ago, Dafey said:

As a rule of thumb I don't eat any seafood that weighs more than 30 pounds. Fish have the ability to consume toxins and instead of killing the fish it stores the toxins in it's flesh. So, over time the toxins in really large fish often have a concentrated level of toxins.

1.5 kilos is a relatively young fish so not likely it is loaded with toxins...although the area that it has lived in could create a higher level than normal, (or lower).

 

Japonese eat loads of blue fin (and that is is a BIG fish) - and live longest and happiest (?) life

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JohnSurrey
5 minutes ago, RR3 said:

Japonese eat loads of blue fin (and that is is a BIG fish) - and live longest and happiest (?) life

Bluefin is my favourite here

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Semper paratus
10 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

Is tanigue bulis ?

Tanigue

Tanigue (tangigue) refers to various fish in the Philippines. The more common species are known in English as follows:

Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson)

Indo-Pacific king mackerel (Scomberomorus guttatus)

Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri)

Other fish that have been called tanigue include the ones with the scientific names of Sarda orientalis(striped bonito), Scomber australiscus, Scomber japonicus, Scomberomorus queensladicus, and Scomberomorus semifasciatus.

Wahoo is often sometimes known as Black Tangigue to distinguish it from the Spanish Mackerel or White Tangigue. Wahoo is also distinguished by its beak-like mouth. They can grow to more than 80 kilograms.

In the Philippines, the most common way of cooking tanigue (Spanish mackerel) is to slice the fish crosswise into thick “steaks” for frying or grilling — really delicious with a spritz of calamansi (citrus) and optionally soy sauce, and served accompanying freshly steamed white rice.

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Dafey
2 hours ago, RR3 said:

Japonese eat loads of blue fin (and that is is a BIG fish) - and live longest and happiest (?) life

 

2 hours ago, JohnSurrey said:

Bluefin is my favourite here

While it is very tasty I believe Bluefin is on the endangered list. 

Quote

 

image.png.33a253fdd06ff5f58769968cf0a9211c.png

Perhaps the most iconic of endangered fish, the bluefin tuna occupies most of the northern Atlantic Ocean. One of the fastest fish in the sea, this species can grow to a length of 10 feet and weigh more than 1,400 pounds. This species' reputation as a fighter has made it a popular catch among recreational fisherman. And at a going rate of up to $100,000 per fish, it's highly prized by commercial fisherman as well. Bluefin tuna are heavily overfished, and most experts agree that without prompt intervention, the slow-growing, slow-maturing species will become extinct. International regulation is tricky, however, since the bluefin tuna is known to migrate thousands of miles across the ocean. And so far, efforts to control harvests have largely failed. Chosen by the WWF (formerly known as the World Wildlife Fund) as the sixth most threatened species in the world, sea or land, the bluefin tuna is by all measures critically endangered.

 

https://animals.howstuffworks.com/endangered-species/top-10-most-endangered-fish10.htm

And again with the 30 pound limit...If it doesn't fit on my grill, I don't eat it!

 

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JohnSurrey
8 hours ago, Semper paratus said:

Tanigue

Tanigue (tangigue) refers to various fish in the Philippines. The more common species are known in English as follows:

Narrow-barred Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson)

Indo-Pacific king mackerel (Scomberomorus guttatus)

Wahoo (Acanthocybium solandri)

Other fish that have been called tanigue include the ones with the scientific names of Sarda orientalis(striped bonito), Scomber australiscus, Scomber japonicus, Scomberomorus queensladicus, and Scomberomorus semifasciatus.

Wahoo is often sometimes known as Black Tangigue to distinguish it from the Spanish Mackerel or White Tangigue. Wahoo is also distinguished by its beak-like mouth. They can grow to more than 80 kilograms.

In the Philippines, the most common way of cooking tanigue (Spanish mackerel) is to slice the fish crosswise into thick “steaks” for frying or grilling — really delicious with a spritz of calamansi (citrus) and optionally soy sauce, and served accompanying freshly steamed white rice.

Thanks - I know which one it is now - I sometimes buy it but I think it's more expensive than tuna - so I tend to buy that most of the time.

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Semper paratus

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