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SkyMan

My Diesel Ford Ranger Single Cab

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SkyMan

Most of my life I've had gas/petrol cars so I'm used to jump in and turn the key. I have had this Ranger for about a year and another diesel a couple years longer. Most of the time I remember to wait for the heater before starting. And if the truck is warm there is no wait necessary. So sometimes when it's cold I forget to wait. The Ranger is new and it just starts up anyway but I wonder if doing that is somehow bad for the truck? Is that going to increase unburned fuel deposits or something?

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cookie47
Most of my life I've had gas/petrol cars so I'm used to jump in and turn the key. I have had this Ranger for about a year and another diesel a couple years longer. Most of the time I remember to wait for the heater before starting. And if the truck is warm there is no wait necessary. So sometimes when it's cold I forget to wait. The Ranger is new and it just starts up anyway but I wonder if doing that is somehow bad for the truck? Is that going to increase unburned fuel deposits or something?
Myself i would not worry.

Firstly the amount of fuel that is injected prior to "actually" firing is miniscule.

Secondly diesel is a fairly good lubricant. In fact it was used to lubricate the internals of in line diesel pumps and injectors for years and is still used today to lubricate common rail injectors and high pressure pumps.

I would be more worried if it was a petrol (gas) engine as petrol has no lubricating properties. I cringe when years ago when people would crank a petrol engine with the choke engaged for minute after minute not realising that all the lubricating oil is being washed off the top of the bores.

Lastly, late model diesels DO have a catalytic convertor, or dpf (Diesel particulate filter) but again the amount of fuel in "question" would not likely be a problem to do damage and i feel would need a lot of "non start" cranking to ingest damaging amounts of fuel.. (assuming the injectors were still active)..
Petrol engines are much more likely and do suffer cat damaged when FLOODED with petrol.



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to_dave007

Do all diesels have the glo plugs that my old Toyota Tamaraw had?  Why doesn't the 2003 Crosswind have a heater switch like the 1995 Tamaraw had?

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shadow
8 minutes ago, to_dave007 said:

Do all diesels have the glo plugs that my old Toyota Tamaraw had?  Why doesn't the 2003 Crosswind have a heater switch like the 1995 Tamaraw had?

Diesel engine technology, especially in the injection areas, has improved dramatically in the last 30 years. Mechanical pumps that opened the injectors once they built up a specific amount of pressure, have been replaced by electronic injectors to control the timing and amount of fuel delivered. The much greater efficiency allows they do not need to heat the cylinder in order to fire diesel.

In the old days, most diesels had an engine heater or glow plugs of some sort. Many later diesels do not have this.

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SkyMan

Mine is only a couple years old.  There's a coil symbol on the dash for the heater.  When that goes out you're good to hit the starter.  Sometimes I forget the wait but it starts anyway.

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Soupeod

My old Ford truck had glow plugs and they would go out on that international engine.  The last truck I had was a RAM w/cummins engine with some kind of heater mechanism and never had a problem.  Maybe your owners manual will tell you more?

Other than that, all the diesel engines I have used HMMWV, Ford, RAM and now a Toyota all call to periodically remove the excess water from a valve on the engine. 

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cookie47

Now,
Most "commercial" large capacity diesel engines have direct injection that injects fuel directly into the combustion chamber. This normally coupled with a high compression which facilitates not needing heaters (glow plugs). Note this is not completely black and white and there are some variations..

PRE COMBUSTION CHAMBER.

Diesel s were found to be quieter if used with a pre... Combustion chamber and are preferred to be used on passenger vehicles where diesel noise was an issue to the general public. (inside the vehicle)

With engines that are of the pre Combustion design the fuel is injected in to a precombustion chamber which fires the fuel which then flows to the top of the piston. However this causes difficulties with firing the fuel at lower temperatures, so a glow plug is STILL predominantly fitted to engines with this design.

Now to answer dav007 question.

On the Tamaraw the glow plugs were activated on a particular position of the ignition key (the glow position)Like many Toyota vehicles.

On the Izuzu assuming its got an indirect diesel engine and being that year i would expect it to have???? , a Timer relay is used that turns on the glow plugs on the first position of the key from 2 to 10 seconds (on average) depending on the ambient temperature...

Now... I would expect it to have glow plugs.

The engine IS direct injection without glow plugs,, unlikely for a passenger vehicle, but possible and i will happy to be advised.

The tell tail lamp on the dash has failed and the glow plugs ARE actually working but you have no visual idea that they are.

SOME,,,,, good condition diesels WILL start in the ambient temperature that we have here in PH. Even without glow plugs,My personal Landcruiser would start in the warmer months in Western Australia but would not have a chance in cool climates due to failing glowplugs.

Years , ago in the UK we would light a newspaper and hold it in front of the Air filter on a hard start diesel to warm the intake air. IT WORKED...

Also, as Shadow said, technology is marching on and its hard to keep up.

My advice is generic not specific without being there..











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trthebees
3 hours ago, cookie47 said:

Lastly, late model diesels DO have a catalytic convertor, or dpf (Diesel particulate filter) but again the amount of fuel in "question" would not likely be a problem to do damage and i feel would need a lot of "non start" cranking to ingest damaging amounts of fuel.. (assuming the injectors were still active)..

Interesting mention of DPF. I wonder if they're fitted to diesels here, or only in places like Europe with stricter pollution controls. If they are fitted here, I'd wonder how they can get a good run at decent revs to enable them to self clean, all that nipping to the shops and sitting in city traffic would mean a good run is needed now and again. They are ridiculously expensive to replace, and if the electronics shuts the engine down if it gets defective, that'd be a real pain.

1 hour ago, cookie47 said:

Years , ago in the UK we would light a newspaper and hold it in front of the Air filter on a hard start diesel to warm the intake air. IT WORKED...

Yup, when on site many years ago in the UK in winter we didn't mess around with all the mixer trucks and cranes, if they didn't start just about first time, we used yesterdays copies of the Sun and Mirror.

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Semper paratus

A few years ago, well maybe quite a few yeas ago, I was around ships and boats a lot.  Some of the larger diesel engines were started with dynamite in a starting chamber. That warmed things up quickly and started the piston down.. I don't recall they had glow plugs. :o) LOL Note: Do not try this method at home on your personal diesel vehicle. We sometimes pumped so much either into the engines in cold weather we about passed out from the fumes. I kind of miss that smell. Not really, it was a tad dangerous. Oh well. Over the years I found other uses for starting fluid/either. But that might be a bit off topic. Hopefully it isn't too cold where the OP is now. :o). I had two diesel trucks before moving here. Great for long haul trips but I think they are a waste for driving short trips on these islands. Just my opinion.  

 

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cookie47

Wonderful story.

Photo shows a product every outback mechanic has in Australia.

However the problem is,,,, its is known that constant use of this product (which you mention correctly as ether) the engine gets addicted to it due to the fact all the carbon around the piston rings that was somewhat helping an old and tired engine to run gets blown to the Sheeeet house causing more damage than good.
aad25fc57ea64799d5628ebae2c05efe.jpg

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cookie47
Yup, when on site many years ago in the UK in winter we didn't mess around with all the mixer trucks and cranes, if they didn't start just about first time, we used yesterdays copies of the Sun and Mirror.
Sure, I've not had a chance to crawl under a new vehicle in the PH and probably won't,, haha. I do know that at Toyota (Melbourne) before it closed that cars would come down the line requiring country specific trim and buyer specs,, however I'm not aware of any major mechanical changes. I think it would slow the line down...???

True,, one sensor out of calibration can shut the engine down which is crazy when one has been in some very remote locations as i have.

Lastly, although i advocate technology and that of specifically relating to pollution,, give me an older vehicle i can have a chance to fix on the side of the road (relatively speaking. )



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SkyMan

My Ranger was made in Thailand and most of those trucks go to Oz so it may be to Oz standards but then, then are differences so any pollution stuff may have been left off.

1 hour ago, Semper paratus said:

Great for long haul trips but I think they are a waste for driving short trips on these islands. Just my opinion.  

I like the p10/per liter fuel discount.

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Soupeod

First time I saw these little diesel engines were in the Toyotas the Japanese donated for the gulf war. (Desert strom)

I always wondered why cant we get these great engines in the US?

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Semper paratus
5 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

My Ranger was made in Thailand and most of those trucks go to Oz so it may be to Oz standards but then, then are differences so any pollution stuff may have been left off.

I like the p10/per liter fuel discount.

What is the going rate of a diesel engine over a gas engine in a car or pick-up? The last time I was involved in it the cost differential was not worth it. Diesel cars and pick-ups were mostly a fad. But if you did a lot of towing diesels are the ticket. They are work horses, gas engines are racehorses. Short trips will kill a diesel, they like running hot.

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cookie47
My Ranger was made in Thailand and most of those trucks go to Oz so it may be to Oz standards but then, then are differences so any pollution stuff may have been left off.
I like the p10/per liter fuel discount.
From October 2018 All light vehicles with diesel engines entering Australia need to a comply with the Euro 5 standards which include the fitting of particulate filters.

This is just a basic quote, other aspects would need to be looked into.



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