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trthebees

Well I'm not daft around vehicles and machinery and have done most jobs.

But I think a little advice would come in handy.

My F5a 6 valve brakes have gone hard, I've checked vacuum hoses and the steel pipe, and I'm fairly certain the servo has failed. 

I want to replace it and the master cylinder, but it looks a right pig of a job hiding up behind the dash. Has anyone ever done this and could provide a few words of wisdom?

I'd also like to buy the parts in advance either in Cebu city or Dumaguete. Obviously new preferred for these important items and the fact it's an awkward job, I don't want to go to the city twice after trying used parts which aren't any good. Does anyone know of a good parts shop for such items new without taking samples first. A bit of a tall ask I know!

Thanks for any advice.

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Woolf

@shadow

This must be one for you to answer

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SkyMan

I don't think new is possible.  Perhaps rebuilt.  Surplus shops have them.  I forget what they're called but it's the whole assembly, master cylinder, pedals, the works.  I had someone change mine out and guys that have done it before can do it pretty fast as ugly as it looks.  I asked about a rebuild kit and got nothing.

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shadow

In Dumaguete, DAPCI or HVL.

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cookie47

, Hi I'm just wondering if you had have considered positively checking that you  have vacuum at the feed pipe (at the booster) which usually (but not always) has the "check valve" attached to it. This as you have correctly pointed out is on the side of the booster reservoir under the dash which is a PITA to get too. 

Also an inline check valve can also be fitted "somewhere" in the steel line section. 

The most common is the one at the booster and traditionally look like a plastic banjo. In all the vehicles I've worked on in the course of the motor trade not very many I've changed was a fault with the booster assembly or the diaphragm unless the chamber was rusted. OR the reaction valve was faulty. The check valve disc can leak due to dirt, OR, the feed pipe at the inlet manifold can get blocked with dried oil bypassed into the inlet manifold. This doesn't allow vacuum to build. 

So I'm not there so i could be wrong, but the test/checks i describe are standard proceed in a workshop environment prior to changing the booster. 

David 

 

 

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trthebees

And thanks Thanks for the replies. I'll do a double check cookie for vacuum at the booster just in case, never know your luck. And thanks shadow for the suggestions in Dumaguete.

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cookie47
And thanks Thanks for the replies. I'll do a double check cookie for vacuum at the booster just in case, never know your luck. And thanks shadow for the suggestions in Dumaguete.
Another issue I've found is its possible for the rubber vacuum hose at the manifold to harden with age and a loos it's elasticity and either leak or crack or in the worst case fall off completely,Although completely falling off would cause a massive vacuum leak and stalling.

As I'm not there i can only offer you every scenario I've come across.

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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jtmwatchbiz
5 minutes ago, cookie47 said:

As I'm not there i can only offer you every scenario I've come across.

yes i agree i would start by checking for vacuum right at the booster and if none then work my way back toward the intake manifold.   found many older engines suffering a bit of reversion and/or blow-by can have carbon buildup at vacuum ports.

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trthebees

Just to update on the final job. 

I did test the vacuum at the servo...good vac so certainly servo. Seems servo in the UK, booster in USA, and hydrovac here.

Removed it and my wife sent a nephew to Dumaguete who got a new one at 4g, seems he knew that as a place to go, left it to him. 1250 pesos, no doubt Chinese with a lovely sticker saying "Japanese quality"so must be good!

I did use a local mechanic to replace it and take the wheels off to check everything, some new seals fitted and a couple of re-linings, which he sorted locally. Not worn, but coming slightly un-bonded. Had that before, don't know if it's the humidity. Since I did my hip, I really don't like the up and down and squirming about under the vehicle bleeding etc. And for 2400 including linings it was a good deal, which is one advantage of the simple and common old multicab.

Time will tell now, but it's only used for local pottering about.

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lamoe
6 minutes ago, trthebees said:

Just to update on the final job. 

I did test the vacuum at the servo...good vac so certainly servo. Seems servo in the UK, booster in USA, and hydrovac here.

Removed it and my wife sent a nephew to Dumaguete who got a new one at 4g, seems he knew that as a place to go, left it to him. 1250 pesos, no doubt Chinese with a lovely sticker saying "Japanese quality"so must be good!

I did use a local mechanic to replace it and take the wheels off to check everything, some new seals fitted and a couple of re-linings, which he sorted locally. Not worn, but coming slightly un-bonded. Had that before, don't know if it's the humidity. Since I did my hip, I really don't like the up and down and squirming about under the vehicle bleeding etc. And for 2400 including linings it was a good deal, which is one advantage of the simple and common old multicab.

Time will tell now, but it's only used for local pottering about.

She said she heard brake noise  - I didn't, but that's to be expected. :oldtimer:

So had the guy who does all my work check'em

Checked all, cleaned, 'no need for anything else'. Noise gone.

Due to the pollution here he recommended removing wheels every 3 months and cleaning myself.

Some will say not needed - others doesn't hurt - given the layers of film on windows after a few days - will do.

'Sold' me a can of spray cleaner - I figured - 'OK wants to make a few extra P' - has done some work at no extra charge.

Checked price at local auto supply place - his price was P100 less.

If I remember correctly about 500P for checking / cleaning brakes, checking / lubricating steering linkage (broke master link - the problem that brought me to him in the first place) and spray cleaner.

 

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cookie47

Just be carefull of Brake cleaner and Carby cleaner. Used outside carefully with a mask will probably be ok. You don't describe "exactly" what cleaner you used so I'm flying blind, but just read the attached article.

Its a wonder I'm still here as i was in the motor trade from 15 years old and would regularly dedust brake drums when asbestos was used extensively on Brake shoes and,, prior to the advent of electronic testers we used a naked flame to test for air-conditioning leaks, however it was found the that procedure gave off Phosgene, not a nice gas...

https://envirofluid.com/articles/brake-cleaner-non-chlorinated-vs-chlorinated-how-to-choose-between-deadly-deadlier/

Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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