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PhilsFan

It's finally here! The $35k Tesla has arrived. 

Order on your phone in 1-5 minutes, arrives at your home in 2-4 weeks.

7 day/1000 mile no-hassle return if not happy.

500K-1Mil mile drivetrain life. 

Safest car ever tested.

Almost No maintenance, brake pads will last at least 100k-150K miles.

If service problems, most fixed in your driveway with mobile service.

$6-8 to fill your "tank".

No more gas stations, plug-in at home, ready to go when you are.

Pre-warmed/cooled car before you leave.

Set constant temperature for pets while you are away.

Sentry mode is a multi-camera inside and out... free security.

Full glass roof standard.

Drive almost anywhere on Supercharger Network 170 miles in 30 minutes charge time(expanding every week) in N America/Europe/parts of Asia. approx 13,000 chargers now plus 10's of thousands of medium speed "destination" chargers at hotels and Malls.

2 levels of self-driving available, starting at $3k upgrade.

Cheapest Model 3 does 0-60mph in 5.4 seconds, the more range you buy, the faster you go.

Wow!

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It's finally here! The $35k Tesla has arrived.  Order on your phone in 1-5 minutes, arrives at your home in 2-4 weeks. 7 day/1000 mile no-hassle return if not happy. 500K-1Mil mile driv

Boy you certainly wouldn't want to take a long trip if you have to stop every 170 miles to recharge.

Can anyone guess who has invested in Tesla stock ?

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Humboldt

 Wow, should of invested in Tesla stock .. that looks like a winner

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RogerDuMond
5 hours ago, PhilsFan said:

Drive almost anywhere on Supercharger Network 170 miles in 30 minutes charge time

Boy you certainly wouldn't want to take a long trip if you have to stop every 170 miles to recharge.

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PhilsFan
7 hours ago, RogerDuMond said:

Boy you certainly wouldn't want to take a long trip if you have to stop every 170 miles to recharge.

Most stops are about 20 minutes..you charge just enough to get to the next one if on a road trip...so drive 2.-3 hrs. stop and charge while eating, relief, etc. adds about an hour to an 800-mile trip.

FOR NOW. Faster charge speeds coming soon.

Autopilot drives the trip for you in most cases..so you can drive all day and be rested at the end of your day. It's still early days. It's only been 6 years they have been making sedans that supercharge. Most days your not road tripping or driving over 200 miles, correct? 

Supercharging costs a lot less than gasoline, too.

Here in the Phil's if you install say a 3-5kw home solar array...fuel for your car and your home electric cost you nothing, depending on your home size, electric use. 

2 hours ago, RangerUp said:

Coming to Cebu in 2029...

Coming to Cebu via the new China plant in mid to end of 2020 most likely. They already sell and install the PowerWall here.

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PhilsFan
9 hours ago, lamoe said:

If they've improved on this to get it to say 10% / 15% then doable

https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-battery-range-sub-zero-snowy-conditions/

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They sell a ton of Tesla's in Chicago. Norway Tesla is currently 3rd most sold vehicle in the country and the new cheaper Model 3 hasn't arrived yet. Tesla has 10% market share in Norway, and it gets fricking cold there. Winter cause few or no problems for Teslas.

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PhilsFan
1 minute ago, RangerUp said:

Charging stations?

TBD. They will Install SC stations based on sales. Typically the car owners start a club and install 30-40 amp chargers along common routes out of the cities so you can get where you need to go. Not ideal, for sure but a couple hour charge on a road trip until u get to your hotel is possible. Keep in mind in Phil's speeds are slow...a Tesla averaging under 50mph is going to get at least 1/3 to 1/2 more range on a road trip. That should cover the whole day if you charge at a hotel overnight. Tesla Club members often convince Hotels to offer charging as an incentive for wealthier tesla owners to stay at their hotel. Tesla will often supply the chargers free to the hotel owners.

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to_dave007
46 minutes ago, PhilsFan said:

 Typically the car owners start a club and install 30-40 amp chargers along common routes out of the cities so you can get where you need to go. Not ideal, for sure but a couple hour charge on a road trip until u get to your hotel is possible. 

Maybe I can get Roger to install one at his place in Asturias, so I can have enough juice to get over the hills on TransCentral.

For me, the low maintenance requirement, and energy cost reduction would be attractive.  95%+ of all trips I make are within the cars range..  say Tuburan to Bogo return or Tuburan to the city return (would need to charge in city..  or at Rogers place).

Things I'd wonder or worry about...

  1. Can I get over the mountain with a full load in car?
  2.  If I get LO BAT stranded in the province, how do I get rescued?  No-one has a porto-BAT.  Would need to carry a LONG extension cord and trickle charge from someone's house outlet.
  3.  Would like a little higher vehicle clearance underneath for these country roads.
  4.  The thing likely drives so quiet that people would be bumping into me out here.

Lastly..  You are right that you can likely get hotels to put in chargers to attract a higher class of customer.  But since higher class = higher price, I tend to prefer hotels that like a lower class of customer.

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Salty Dog
2 hours ago, PhilsFan said:

Most stops are about 20 minutes..you charge just enough to get to the next one if on a road trip...so drive 2.-3 hrs. stop and charge while eating, relief, etc. adds about an hour to an 800-mile trip.

What if a couple of dozen are waiting in line ahead of you to charge their cars? 

Over 4 million miles of roads just in the USA. If the cars are the 3rd most popular cars being sold. There's going to have to be thousands of charger units. 

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21 minutes ago, Salty Dog said:

What if a couple of dozen are waiting in line ahead of you to charge their cars? 

Over 4 million miles of roads just in the USA. If the cars are the 3rd most popular cars being sold. There's going to have to be thousands of charger units. 

The vast majority of drivers, drive in urban areas almost exclusively, so Tesla makes sense there. 

I agree that much more work needs to be done before people buy them for longer distance forays.

Either faster charging, battery exchange systems, or just better capacity batteries will be needed.

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Jester

Hmmm, most of my trips are around town and I would only need to charge every few weeks!  So now If I did want to take a bit of a trip,  hmmm I wonder how big of a genset I would need to keep the batteries charged?

I know putting a little trailer together for a generator would be a piece of pie!  Hey I Just reinvented the hybrid car. 

 

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to_dave007
35 minutes ago, Jester said:

Hmmm, most of my trips are around town and I would only need to charge every few weeks!  So now If I did want to take a bit of a trip,  hmmm I wonder how big of a genset I would need to keep the batteries charged?

I know putting a little trailer together for a generator would be a piece of pie!  Hey I Just reinvented the hybrid car. 

 

Make it a woodburner and use sustainable easy to find fuel.

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RogerDuMond
12 hours ago, PhilsFan said:

They will Install SC stations based on sales.

I don't think they will sell worth a damn here.

9 hours ago, dart69 said:

The vast majority of drivers, drive in urban areas almost exclusively, so Tesla makes sense there. 

And what happens when you run out of charge stuck in traffic in Manila.

11 hours ago, to_dave007 said:

Maybe I can get Roger to install one at his place in Asturias, so I can have enough juice to get over the hills on TransCentral.

Think again, no way in hell I would waste my money on that crap.

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Ozepete
17 minutes ago, RogerDuMond said:

I don't think they will sell worth a damn here.

And what happens when you run out of charge stuck in traffic in Manila.

Think again, no way in hell I would waste my money on that crap.

And you finally get to the power point and 'sorry sir, brown out!

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lamoe


 

Quote

 

https://slate.com/technology/2019/03/tesla-model-3-35k-elon-musk-ouch.html

But the company managed to achieve this triumph in just about the least inspiring way possible—with a special announcement that included layoffs, store closures, and financial red flags.

 

Read the story about the victory  - layout, closing, etc.

The map is present recharging stations across the country. Better not plan on driving across N. Dakota in January
 

Quote

 

Tesla Is Finally Building the Car It Always Promised, and Nobody’s Happy

But maybe we should be.

By Will Oremus

March 01, 20195:28 PM

On Thursday, Tesla delivered at last on CEO Elon Musk’s ultimate promise: a $35,000 electric car.

But the company managed to achieve this triumph in just about the least inspiring way possible—with a special announcement that included layoffs, store closures, and financial red flags. By Friday morning, the company’s stock had dropped 8 percent.

The new base Model 3 will come with less range and a less fancy interior than previous versions, and it will be available only in black. A supercar it isn’t, though the performance remains impressive for a vehicle of its price. Regardless, it meets the minimum requirements of Tesla’s longtime pledge to build an all-electric family sedan with good range at a price that’s affordable to people who aren’t wealthy. You can order one right now on Tesla.com, and it will arrive in two to four weeks.

Of all the concrete ambitions Musk has set for Tesla, this one proved elusive even as it shattered expectations in other respects. I’ve been badgering the company about the goal ever since the Model S launched in 2012. Back then, a Tesla rep told me the affordable sedan would probably come in 2015. Over the years, that date got pushed back again and again. Tesla started taking orders for the Model 3 in 2016, but only for more expensive versions, which began limited production the following year. Asked again about the $35,000 version in May, Musk said that lowering the price at that time would “cause Tesla to lose money and die.” Until this week, the cheapest Model 3 cost $42,900.

Now, four years after it was announced, the $35,000 Model 3 is finally here. (Whether that’s truly “affordable” is another debate, but it’s the benchmark the company set for itself long ago.)

Yet, if the cost to consumers is reasonable, the price point has taken a toll on Tesla, its workers, and its shareholders—not to mention Musk’s mental health.

The company already went through “production hell” to meet milestones, raising questions about worker safety and the car’s reliability. Now, to make ends meet, Musk said that Tesla will have to close physical stores around the country, laying off many sales workers, as it begins selling cars only online. It will keep a relatively small number of showrooms in high-profile locations. At the same time, Musk shifted from predicting a profitable quarter to another loss, spooking investors.

In a call with reporters Thursday, Musk did not even try to dress up the shift to all-online sales as some kind of strategic masterstroke. He said that there was “no way around it” and that it would save the company 6 percent on the cost of each car. “It’s excruciatingly difficult to make this car for $35,000,” Musk said, according to the Verge.

As the Drive’s Edward Niedermeyer pointed out, it’s a dramatic shift: As recently as December, Tesla had boasted about opening 11 new retail stores, and it was still lobbying New Jersey in January to open more. Now Tesla will be scaling back its physical presence at a time when it’s under fire for reliability problems, which recently cost the Model 3 its coveted Consumer Reports recommendation. Despite the store closures, Tesla said Thursday that it will increase investment in service, with most service now done by sending Tesla representatives to drivers, rather than having them bring their cars in to the shop. And with fewer stores offering test drives, the company will now allow drivers to return a vehicle within seven days or 1,000 miles for a full refund.

To investors, these moves carry a whiff of desperation. In addition to the base Model 3, Tesla dropped prices on other versions and models Thursday. CNBC’s roundup of analyst responses suggests that many are concerned the cuts are a sign of reduced demand, which would be ominous: For all of Tesla’s other problems, wildly strong demand has been the constant that has kept the company afloat. Musk didn’t exactly sooth those fears on Thursday: He said his “gut feel” was that the company could sell 500,000 Model 3s per year, which would be quite strong, but he added, “I don’t know what demand is. We’ll see.”

It’s hard for me to imagine demand will falter. Plenty of would-be Tesla buyers over the years have told me they dearly wanted one but were holding out for the $35,000 version. A bigger worry might be profit margins: Musk flatly refused to answer a question about how much profit Tesla would make on each Model 3.

The disappointment surrounding Thursday’s news would have been hard to imagine until recently. If you had told Tesla supporters a decade ago, a half-decade ago, or even three years ago that the company would indeed eventually deliver an all-electric, four-door family sedan with 220 miles of range, sports-car acceleration, and a charging network that spans much of the country, they would have been amazed and thrilled. Instead, the news comes cloaked in grim trade-offs and shadowed by Musk’s run-ins with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

But the company’s turmoil and financial straits shouldn’t entirely obscure what it has accomplished here. Musk, for all his warts, showed once again that he cares more about Tesla’s original mission of making electric cars mainstream than he cares about making money or mollifying investors. While blown deadlines and not-quite-kept promises have become par for the course over Tesla’s history, Musk and his company have stayed remarkably true to the long-term master plan he laid out back in 2006. And the fact that other companies beat Tesla to its goal of building an electric car for the masses is a testament to the power of Musk’s vision: Those companies had no such plans until Tesla showed that it could be done.

In other words: Even if the $35,000 Model 3 turns out to be a Pyrrhic victory for Tesla, the victory for electric vehicles—and, potentially, the environment—is real.

 


 

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