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lamoe

Car-jack-on-steroids exposes vehicles' underbellies

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lamoe

 

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https://newatlas.com/its-a-jack-tilts-cars/58404/

Although professional mechanics use a lift or a pit to get at the undersides of cars, home-based tinkerers don't usually have such a setup in their garage. And while using a wheeled creeper to squeeze underneath the vehicle is one alternative, the new "It's a Jack" lets users tilt their autos over instead.

Made of powder-coated steel, the jack incorporates a ramped platform which the vehicle's front wheels are driven up onto. After those wheels are securely strapped in place, a hand-operated cable winch is then used to lift one end of that platform up off the floor, taking the car along with it.

According to the designer, vehicles weighing as much as 3.5 tons (3.2 tonnes) can be tilted up to 80 degrees within five minutes. The tilting action is claimed to place no stress on the chassis or wheel bearings, with an extension of the jack apparently preventing the car from tipping right over.

Caster wheels on the underside of the device make it easier to move around, when it's not lifting a vehicle. And in order to save space, it can be disassembled for storage.

Should you be interested, It's a Jack is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$1,000 will get you one, when and if they reach production. The planned retail price is $1,500.

It can be seen in use, in the video below.

Sources: Kickstarter, It's a Jack

 

 

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SkyMan
1 hour ago, lamoe said:

Should you be interested, It's a Jack is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign. A pledge of US$1,000 will get you one, when and if they reach production. The planned retail price is $1,500.

I think a 4 post lift is around $2k

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lamoe
21 minutes ago, SkyMan said:

I think a 4 post lift is around $2k

Yep - $2,000 for 4 post, $1,700 for 2 post

 

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cookie47

An interesting concept that may well help with some repairs, However having been in the Motor trade for all of my working life it certainly has limits. Yes i noted in the text its not a professional workshop intended item.

General underbody checks,, yes

Maybe brake repairs (two wheels)..
yes.

Exhaust checks, but lack of starting engine is somewhat an issue.

Body repair on a particular area,, yes.

Negatives.....

A large quantity of differential oil sitting on the hub seals. Hub seals are not designed for that..

Gearbox removal .... NO, supporting the engine would be problematic.

Differential removal (a solid axle) NO, Unless you worked on each side separately.

Suspension work,, NO,(apart from shock absorbers) as the weight of the car is essentially sitting on the suspension components,certainly at the rear in the case of a solid axle.

A four post hoist is the safest option (as long as you remember to place the end stop), if not automatic.. I've seen a number of vehicles fall off hoists when the mechanic "forgot" to insert wheel stop. Later versions have a automatic device... But not in 1962 when i started.

Two posts hoists are cheaper and have virtually taken over due to cost and allow brake and suspension work to be carried out easily without the need for extras jacks, Also up to 3 tonnes (a standard workshop capacity) single phase is normal now, whereas 3 phase was standard years ago.

Two post hoists need to be used with caution also, making sure that the vehicle is balanced between the two lift arms. I once saw an Australian utility tip upwards at the front as the owner did not advise and the mechanic did not realize that it had one tonne of bag cement in the rear..

True that some wrecking yards place there cars on their sides for dismantling but that's a different story

Anyway i like the idea... but tilting a car that far would freak me out.















Sent from my Redmi Note 3 using Tapatalk

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Dafey

I hope they remembered to take that Starbucks out of the cup holder!

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SkyMan
41 minutes ago, Dafey said:

I hope they remembered to take that Starbucks out of the cup holder!

Yeah, and I think it could shorten the battery life.  I believe over time the lead plates flake a little off from discharging and recharging and by tilting the battery like that the pile of flakes could pile to one side get between the plates.  Also it could be bad for the fuel fume recovery system where they say to only fill the tank to full, not over full.  Might even set off the car's crash sensor fuel shutoff though that's easily reset.

Edited by SkyMan
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SkyMan
2 hours ago, cookie47 said:

A four post hoist is the safest option (as long as you remember to place the end stop), if not automatic.

And can be used for vehicle storage which probably would not be an issue for a professional mechanic but this tilt device really isn't intended for a proffesional mechanic.

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